#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'public health'

Results 1 - 10 of 18

Health 2020 priority area four: creating supportive environments and resilient communities: a compendium of inspirational examples


2018

Brings together innovative examples of actions taken in 13 countries to strengthen resilience and build supportive environments for population health and well-being. The examples show how building resilience can be achieved by developing and sustaining partnerships between institutions and communities; by community action and bottom-up efforts; at system level, both nationally and locally. The examples, primarily gathered from community initiatives, are linked to the four types of resilience capacities: adaptive, absorptive, anticipatory and transformative. Topics covered include the role of resilience building in addressing human rights, health inequities, environmental hazards, and health-related topics such as communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Examples from the UK include: Promoting social connections and community networks for older people through Better in Sheffield; Supporting local systems to tackle the social determinants of health inequalities; Strengthening resilience through the early intervention and prevention: breaking the generational cycle of crime project; and A social movement for health and resilience in Blackburn with Darwen. Each example attempts to describe: the action undertaken; the resilience-related issue that the action aimed to address; and the impact and lessons learnt in the process of strengthening resilience.

Health matters: community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

This resource focuses on the concept and practice of community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing and outlines how to create the conditions for community assets to thrive. It looks at the benefits of working with communities, in terms of improved outcomes and potential savings. It also outlines the range of community-centred approaches that can be used to improve community health and wellbeing. These include initiatives to strengthen communities; volunteering and peer support; collaborations and partnerships; and access to community resources. It highlights evidence, key policy documents and includes links to resources and case studies.

Due North: the report of the Inquiry on Health Equity for the North

INQUIRY PANEL ON HEALTH EQUITY FOR THE NORTH OF ENGLAND
2014

This inquiry report sets out a series of strategic and practical policy recommendations to address the social inequalities in health that exist both within the North of England, and between the North and the rest of England. The inquiry, commissioned by Public Health England, was led by an independent Review Panel of leading academics, policy makers and practitioners from the North of England. The report identifies the main causes of the of health inequalities within and between North and South to be differences in the: poverty, power and resources needed for health; exposure to health damaging environments, such as poorer living and working conditions and unemployment; chronic disease and disability; and differences in opportunities to enjoy positive health factors and protective conditions that help maintain health, such as good quality early years education; control over decisions that affect your life; social support and feeling part of the society. The report provides recommendations on what agencies and central government need to do to reduce these inequalities. They cover: tackling poverty and economic inequality; promoting healthy development in early childhood; sharing power over resources and increasing the influence that the public has on how resources are used to improve the determinants of health and developing the capacity of communities to participate in local decision-making; and strengthen the role of the health sector in promoting health equity.

Public health working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector: new opportunities and sustainable change

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2017

A collection of case study examples which show how public health and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE) are working together to improve people's health and wellbeing. The case studies cover the themes of: positive partnership and engagement between public health and the VCSE sector; commissioning and new delivery models; supporting a financially sustainable future; integrating services; and community-centred approaches. Case studies include an initiative to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people; an integrated lifestyle and wellness support services for people at the greatest risk of poor health outcomes; and lonely, and socially isolated a marginalised people. Each case study includes an overview of the service, evaluation findings where available and key learning from the initiative. Suggestions for good practice in partnership working between public health and the VCSE sector are also included.

Working with faith groups to promote health and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

This report, published in association with FaithAction, looks at how local authorities and faith groups can work together to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes of communities. It also highlights examples of good practice from across the country, and from different faiths, to demonstrate the wide range of activity taking place. The report covers how faith groups can improve health outcomes and tackle health inequalities; the benefits of joint working for councils, health organisations and faith groups; barriers to collaboration and what local authorities can do to make sure the widest range of groups are involved; and looks at ways of establishing effective partnerships and activities, including through adopting the national Faith Covenant. The report includes questions for councils and faith groups to assess whether there is more that can be done to work well together. It also signposts to useful resources for further learning and action.

The impact of faith-based organisations on public health and social capital

NOVEMBER Lucy
2014

Summarises research evidence on the relationship between faith and health, and on the role of faith communities in improving health and reducing health inequalities. It also provides an overview of faith in the UK and the health problems prevalent within different ethnic and faith communities. The literature was identified through searches carried out on a range of databases and organisational websites, and was structured into two ‘strands’. Strand one looks at how faith based organisations represent communities with poor health outcomes, and provide an opportunity for public health services to access these ‘hard to reach’ groups. Strand two looks at how the social and spiritual capital gained by belonging to a faith community can result in physical and mental health benefits and mitigate other determinants of poor health. Findings from the review included that regular engagement in religious activities is positively related to various aspects of wellbeing, and negatively associated with depressive symptoms. There was also evidence to show that volunteering can positively affect the health and wellbeing of volunteers, and that faith communities represent a large proportion of national volunteering. The report provides recommendations for faith-based organisations and public health bodies, on how they might work effectively in partnership to realise the potential for faith groups of improving health and wellbeing.

Public health's role in local government and NHS integration

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Drawing on information from six case studies, this report makes the case for greater engagement of public health in supporting integration across local government and the NHS. It identifies two reasons for public health to be involved in integration: the skills, capacity and expertise public health teams can bring, and the potential of integration for improving health and wellbeing. The report explores four areas in which public health involvement in integration has been found to make the greatest impact: collaborative systems leadership, a population approach, a focus on prevention and developing outcomes. A short self-assessment tool is also included which can be used for areas to consider the extent of public health involvement in integration in their own area. The case studies come from Doncaster, Hertfordshire, London Borough of Richmond, Somerset, Wakefield and Worcestershire.

Better mental health for all: a public health approach to mental health improvement

FACULTY OF PUBLIC HEALTH, MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
2016

This report looks at what can be done individually and collectively to improve the mental health of individuals, families and communities and prevent mental health problems using a public health approach. The report aims to encourage proportionate use of universal services with a focus on the promotion of mental wellbeing and on high level support for those at risk of poor mental health and mental health problems, complementing recovery and prevention approaches. Section one maps out why mental health is an important, highlights its economic and social costs and examines why it is often overlooked. Section two outlines the risk and protective factors through the life course from the early years, to adulthood and later-life. It also looks at the risk and protective factors across communities, for example in the home, education and work settings, and the effects of the built environment and neighbourhoods. Section three addresses approaches and interventions to improve mental health at different stages of the life course and in different settings. Section four offers a practical guide to enable practitioners to support their own mental wellbeing. Case studies of innovative public mental health programmes and projects being run across the UK are included throughout. Annex A includes a list of initiatives received as entries for the Faculty of Public Health public mental health award, 10 of which are included in the report as case examples.

Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities (NG44)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2016

This practice guideline covers approaches to involving local communities as a way of promoting health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities. Recommendations cover: developing collaboration and partnership approaches encourage alliances between community members and statutory, community and voluntary organisations to meet local needs and priorities; involving people in peer and lay roles to represent local needs and priorities; local approaches to making community engagement an integral part of health and wellbeing initiatives; and making it as easy as possible for people to get involved. The guideline also makes recommendations for future research which include research on effectiveness and cost effectiveness; frameworks to evaluate the impact of community engagement; aspects of collaborations and partnerships that lead to improved health and wellbeing; and the effectiveness of social media for improving health and wellbeing. The guideline updates and replaces NICE guideline PH9 (published February 2008).

The role of case studies as evidence in public health

KORJONEN Helena, et al
2016

This study uses a mixed methods approach, comprising a literature review, a content analysis of a sample of case studies and a small number of qualitative interviews on the use and usefulness of case studies, to define, explore and make recommendations around the nature and use of case studies in public health. It suggests that case studies capture local knowledge of programmes and services, and illustrate processes and outcomes that cannot be captured in other ways, and that this is what makes them valuable. The report argues that case studies would benefit from guidelines and templates to improve the format, replicability and assessment and that they would benefit from a higher rating in evidence hierarchies as they often describe complex interventions, implementation and different contexts.

Results 1 - 10 of 18

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#