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Results for 'public health'

Results 1 - 10 of 24

Loneliness, social isolation and COVID-19: practical advice

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC HEALTH
2020

This briefing provides advice for Directors of Public Health and those leading the response to loneliness and social isolation issues arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The advice highlights the importance in intervening early to tackle loneliness and social isolation to prevent more costly health and care needs from developing, as well as helping community resilience and recovery. This can only be done at the local level through partnerships, with councils playing a role, as they own most of the assets where community action could or should take place, such as parks, libraries and schools. A table summarises the main risk factors of loneliness and social isolation, including those specific to COVID-19. It then briefly sets out councils’ role in working with partners and using community assets to address and help prevent loneliness and social isolation; looks at the steps councils were taking prior to the pandemic; and the changes that may be needed as a result of COVID-19 and opportunities to embed positive changes, such as greater awareness about the impact of personal behaviours on mental wellbeing.

Community exchange and time currencies: a systematic and in-depth thematic review of impact on public health outcomes

LEE C, et al
2020

Objectives: Austerity in government funding, and public service reform, has heightened expectations on UK communities to develop activities and resources supportive of population health and become part of a transformed place-based system of community health and social care. As non-monetary place-based approaches, Community Exchange/Time Currencies could improve social contact and cohesion, and help mobilise families, neighbourhoods, communities and their assets in beneficial ways for health. Despite this interest, the evidence base for health outcomes resulting from such initiatives is underdeveloped. Study design: A systematic review. Methods: A literature review was conducted to identify evidence gaps and advance understanding of the potential of Community Exchange System. Studies were quality assessed, and evidence was synthesised on ‘typology’, population targeted and health-related and wider community outcomes. Results: The overall study quality was low, with few using objective measures of impact on health or well-being, and none reporting costs. Many drew on qualitative accounts of impact on health, well-being and broader community outcomes. Although many studies lacked methodological rigour, there was consistent evidence of positive impacts on key indicators of health and social capital, and the data have potential to inform theory. Conclusions: Methodologies for capturing impacts are often insufficiently robust to inform policy requirements and economic assessment, and there remains a need for objective, systematic evaluation of Community Exchange and Time Currency systems. There is also a strong argument for deeper investigation of ‘programme theories’ underpinning these activities, to better understand what needs to be in place to trigger their potential for generating positive health and well-being outcomes.

Community-centred public health: taking a whole system approach. Briefing of research findings

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

A summary of research findings into current practice on approaches to community-centred public health, which are important to reducing health inequalities. Community-centred approaches mobilise assets within communities, encourage equity and social connectedness and increase people’s control over their health and lives. The briefing summarises the key elements, core values and principles that are needed to make a shift to whole system approaches to community-centred public health. It provides information on scaling approaches, involving, strengthening and sustaining approaches. The research briefing is one of a suite of resources to help local authority, NHS and voluntary and community sector (VCS) decision makers to implement and embed community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing at scale. Accompanying resources include a slide-deck presentation of main findings, practice examples and a list of alternative whole system frameworks.

Public mental health: evidence, practice and commissioning

CAMPION Jonathan
2019

Based on a review of recent literature, this report summarises evidence around public mental health practice. Public mental health practice takes a population approach to mental health which includes three levels of mental disorder prevention and mental wellbeing promotion. The review covers: the impact of mental health problems and of mental wellbeing; risk factors for mental disorder and protective factors for mental wellbeing; groups at higher risk of poor mental health; effective interventions to treat mental disorder and to prevent associated impacts, preventing mental disorder from arising and promoting mental wellbeing; and economic savings of different public mental health interventions. It finds that despite the existence of cost-effective public mental health interventions, only a minority of people with a mental condition in England receive any treatment, receive interventions to prevent associated impacts or receive intervention to prevent mental conditions or promote mental wellbeing. It sets out a number of actions to improve coverage of evidence based interventions to reduce the population impact of mental disorder and promote population mental wellbeing. The report has been endorsed by the Association of Directors of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health, Health Education England, Local Government Association, Royal College of General Practitioners, Royal College of Psychiatrists and RSPH (Royal Society of Public Health).

The lives we want to lead: the LGA green paper for adult social care and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

A consultation paper from the Local Government Association, which seeks views on the future of care and support for adults and their unpaid carers. The paper puts forward options to secure the immediate and long-term funding for adult social care, and makes the case for a shift towards preventative, community-based personalised care, which helps maximise people's health, wellbeing and independence. It also considers the importance of housing, public health, other council services, in supporting wellbeing and prevention. Sections cover: differing views about the future of long-term funding for social care; the wider changes needed across care and health to bring out a greater focus on community-based and person-centred prevention; the role of public health and wider council services in supporting and improving wellbeing; and the nature of the relationship between social care and health, integration, accountability and how the new NHS funding could be used for maximum impact. Thirty consultation questions are included throughout the report. The consultation will run until 26 September 2018.

Resilience: understanding the interdependence between individuals and communities

DAVIES Alisha R., et al
2019

Drawing on the results of a literature review, this report brings together evidence on individual and community resilience, and the interdependence between the two. It draws on examples of programmes to strengthen resilience across the life course and in communities, and looks at approaches to measuring change in resilience. The report highlights how people’s sense of wellbeing, how well they cope emotionally, and how they engage socially are the key factors for resilience, which in turn contribute to wider community resilience. Resilient communities can draw on the assets within people, place and wider economic factors. It also finds that resilience is not fixed but changes at different points in peoples' lives. The report highlights a range of activities that improve community and individual resilience, including: encouraging good relationships and connections with others; establishing a healthy family environment and early positive parent-child relationships; promoting good health and mental wellbeing in adulthood, including developing positive relationships and social capital through engaging with the community; and enhancing the resilience of older people though building positive relationships, strengthening social connections and meaningful engagement, alongside enhancing autonomy and independence. It concludes with a summary of the key messages.

Health 2020 priority area four: creating supportive environments and resilient communities: a compendium of inspirational examples


2018

Brings together innovative examples of actions taken in 13 countries to strengthen resilience and build supportive environments for population health and well-being. The examples show how building resilience can be achieved by developing and sustaining partnerships between institutions and communities; by community action and bottom-up efforts; at system level, both nationally and locally. The examples, primarily gathered from community initiatives, are linked to the four types of resilience capacities: adaptive, absorptive, anticipatory and transformative. Topics covered include the role of resilience building in addressing human rights, health inequities, environmental hazards, and health-related topics such as communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Examples from the UK include: Promoting social connections and community networks for older people through Better in Sheffield; Supporting local systems to tackle the social determinants of health inequalities; Strengthening resilience through the early intervention and prevention: breaking the generational cycle of crime project; and A social movement for health and resilience in Blackburn with Darwen. Each example attempts to describe: the action undertaken; the resilience-related issue that the action aimed to address; and the impact and lessons learnt in the process of strengthening resilience.

Health matters: community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

This resource focuses on the concept and practice of community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing and outlines how to create the conditions for community assets to thrive. It looks at the benefits of working with communities, in terms of improved outcomes and potential savings. It also outlines the range of community-centred approaches that can be used to improve community health and wellbeing. These include initiatives to strengthen communities; volunteering and peer support; collaborations and partnerships; and access to community resources. It highlights evidence, key policy documents and includes links to resources and case studies.

Due North: the report of the Inquiry on Health Equity for the North

INQUIRY PANEL ON HEALTH EQUITY FOR THE NORTH OF ENGLAND
2014

This inquiry report sets out a series of strategic and practical policy recommendations to address the social inequalities in health that exist both within the North of England, and between the North and the rest of England. The inquiry, commissioned by Public Health England, was led by an independent Review Panel of leading academics, policy makers and practitioners from the North of England. The report identifies the main causes of the of health inequalities within and between North and South to be differences in the: poverty, power and resources needed for health; exposure to health damaging environments, such as poorer living and working conditions and unemployment; chronic disease and disability; and differences in opportunities to enjoy positive health factors and protective conditions that help maintain health, such as good quality early years education; control over decisions that affect your life; social support and feeling part of the society. The report provides recommendations on what agencies and central government need to do to reduce these inequalities. They cover: tackling poverty and economic inequality; promoting healthy development in early childhood; sharing power over resources and increasing the influence that the public has on how resources are used to improve the determinants of health and developing the capacity of communities to participate in local decision-making; and strengthen the role of the health sector in promoting health equity.

Public health working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector: new opportunities and sustainable change

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2017

A collection of case study examples which show how public health and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE) are working together to improve people's health and wellbeing. The case studies cover the themes of: positive partnership and engagement between public health and the VCSE sector; commissioning and new delivery models; supporting a financially sustainable future; integrating services; and community-centred approaches. Case studies include an initiative to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people; an integrated lifestyle and wellness support services for people at the greatest risk of poor health outcomes; and lonely, and socially isolated a marginalised people. Each case study includes an overview of the service, evaluation findings where available and key learning from the initiative. Suggestions for good practice in partnership working between public health and the VCSE sector are also included.

Results 1 - 10 of 24

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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