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Results for 'quality of life'

Results 1 - 10 of 46

Age Friendly Island: local evaluation. Annual evaluation report 17/18

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2018

Age Friendly Island (AFI) is one of 14 partnership programmes funded through Big Lottery Fulfilling Lives: Ageing Better Programme, to pilot new or joined up ways of working to reduce social isolation in older people. This report presents the findings of an evaluation undertaken in the Isle of Wight in 2017-18, the third year of the Programme. The Programme consists of 12 projects, including Community and Care Navigators, Alzheimers Cafe, Care for Carers, Men in Sheds and Mental Health Peer Support. It finds that the Programme has continued to make progress made towards achieving the four main Programme outcomes. It reports that the Programme has continued to opportunities for older people to increase their social connections and has led to decreased social isolation for people involved across the projects; older people are increasingly co-producing and shaping their own individual support and the services; and significant progress towards the Isle of Wight becoming an Age friendly Island, with an increase in inter-generational activities. Although quantitative health and well-being measures have demonstrated either no progress or minimal changes to levels of health and wellbeing, interviews with participants have shown that participation in the Programme has had a positive impact on the physical and mental health, wellbeing and /or quality of life of those involved. The report includes recommendations for the Ageing Better Programme team and for the projects in the Programme.

A feasibility study of facilitated reminiscence for people living with dementia: report

RYAN Assumpta, et al
2018

Reports on a feasibility study to investigate the effects of a home based, individual reminiscence intervention using an iPad app for people living with dementia and their family carers. The study design had three phases. Phase 1: A User Development Group comprising a paired sample of 6 people living with dementia and their family carers who worked with the research team to design and test the technology; Phase 2: Testing of the developed app with a paired sample of 30 people living with mild to moderate dementia and their family carers (n=60). Participants used the app for 12 weeks at home. Questionnaires which examined the impact of reminiscence on mutuality, wellbeing, quality of life and quality of the relationship between participants living with dementia and their family carers were collected at the beginning, middle and end points of the study. Health economics data were also collected to understand cost effectiveness. Phase 3: Individual interviews with a sample of participants (n=32) to explore their experience of the intervention. The results found that people living with dementia used the app independently and more frequently than their carers. They also showed an increase in the quality of caregiving relationships and emotional well‐being for people living with dementia. Although there was no significant change for carers over the course of the study, the intervention improved the caring relationship and was seen as an enjoyable way to care for themselves and their loved one.

'What would life be: without a song or a dance, what are we?' A report from the Commission on Dementia and Music

BOWELL Sally, BAMFORD Sally-Marie
2018

This report examines the current landscape of using therapeutic music with people with dementia, outlines the value and benefits of music therapy, and looks at what needs to be done to ensure that everyone with dementia is able to access music. Informed by the Commission on Dementia and Music, the report brings together a wide range of evidence, including academic papers, written and oral evidence, and evidence from site visits. The evidence shows that music can help to minimise symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and can help tackle anxiety and depression. Evidence also shows that music can help improves the quality of life for people with dementia by increasing social interaction and decreasing stress. The report also shows that although the dementia and music environment is supported by a dedicated network of individuals and organisations, they work in a complex and poorly coordinate system. The field is also defined by sporadic access, with only relatively few people with dementia having access. It concludes that the sector would benefit from increased funding, further cost-effective research to boost recognition and funding, and increased public awareness about the benefits of music. The report includes recommendations to help improve access to music for people with dementia.

A pilot programme evaluation of social farming horticultural and occupational activities for older people in Italy

GAGLIARDI Cristina, et al
2019

The aim of this study was to evaluate a 1‐year social farming programme conducted between 2014 and 2015, including horticultural and occupational activities on six agricultural farms for older people in good general health. Social farming is a practice that uses agricultural resources to provide health, social or educational services to vulnerable groups of people. Activity participation, social relationships, physical activity, and the quality of life of the participants were assessed using a pretest, posttest design. A total of 112 subjects were interviewed at baseline, though only 73 participants were retained through the end of the follow‐up, resulting in a dropout rate of 34%. Data analysis revealed significant improvements in both social relationships and overall occupational engagement at the end of the programme, with significant increases in the frequency of contact with friends or relatives as well as the number of activities performed by the participants. This work adds to the literature on the effects of social farming and indicates that farming may provide opportunities for older people to engage in activities that stimulate social behaviours.

Creativity in care: evaluation report

CITY ARTS
2014

An evaluation of Creativity in Care, a programme commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council which explored creative approaches to promoting well-being for older people in care and ways of overcoming the barriers that face staff, carers and homes in trying to provide creative and imaginative environments for older people. This report reviews the outcomes of three aspects of the programme: the artist residency, creative mentoring and training. It also sets out recommendations based on the findings. The evaluation identifies the main learning outcomes of the programme as: learning – new approaches were developed by staff resulting in improved motivation and engagement of residents; social skills – positive interaction between residents increased, with one to one work supporting social engagement for the more isolated residents; and value – an improved sense of wellbeing was gained through participation in the arts, with improved levels of confidence and increased decision making; Legacy - the programme led to improved communication, networking and sharing between care homes. Training was also accessed by residential care staff to put into practice beyond the life of the programme.

Evaluation of Time to Shine: year 2 interim findings

WIGFIELD Andrea, ALDEN Sarah
2017

Interim evaluation of Time to Shine, the Big Lottery funded Ageing Better programme running in Leeds, which is funding projects for specific groups most likely to experience isolation and loneliness. These include older men; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender older people (LGBT), Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) older people; and older people with learning disabilities. Based on analysis of the monitoring and evaluation data, the report provides an overview of what has been learnt about what works in reducing social isolation and loneliness and how the programme is leading to change at the individual, local, and citywide level drawing. It also reports on the commissioning process and looks at how co-production has been incorporated into design, and delivery and evaluation of the programme. It reports that as of 30 June 2017, over 5,600 people of all ages have been involved in Time to Shine projects in some way, including: over 2,600 older people participating regularly in Time to Shine projects and 335 older volunteers and 140 volunteers aged 49 or under helping to plan, deliver or steer projects. The results suggest that being involved in Time to Shine helped some people to feel they were more involved in their local area, improved life satisfaction scores.

Residents as volunteers: final evaluation report

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS, HORNUNG Lisa
2018

An evaluation of the Residents as Volunteers project, which aimed to support older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer and to measure the impact of volunteering on well-being and quality of life. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. A total of 110 residents volunteered during the project. Those participating felt that volunteering had a positive impact on their emotional and social well-being and many also reported that volunteering helped them to stay physically and mentally active. The evaluation identified a number of barriers to volunteering faced by care home residents. These included feeling too old, having a health condition, lack of confidence, narrow views of volunteering or anti-volunteering sentiment. The project also found it was far more difficult to reach residents that had never volunteered before. It also identified barriers for staff and care homes themselves, including existing social interactions, staff to resident ratio, existing volunteering culture and non-supportive environment or lack of management buy-in. The report makes some suggestions to overcome these barriers.

TEC stories: how technology enabled care has transformed people's lives

TSA, THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2018

This publication presents 10 individual stories which show how technology enabled care is transforming people’s lives. The stories are told from the individual’s perspective, using their experiences and their own unique circumstances to communicate what technology enabled care means to them. It shows how people are using technology from apps to smart sensors to enhance their independence, better manage long-term health conditions and enable a better quality of life. They include examples of how technology can help to tackle loneliness, provide reminders for people living with dementia, help children in local authority care to make their voices heard and help people to keep in touch with their friends. By giving a voice to people who are already using a wide range of technology, this resource offers political leaders, commissioners and practitioners a case for change.

Live music in care: the impact of music interventions for people living and working in care home settings

TAPSON Christine, et al
2018

An evaluation of a music intervention in five care homes in the UK in order to investigate the impact on older residents, staff and the care home environment. The programme, which was delivered by Live Music Now, consisted of an 11-session interactive weekly music programme focussed on singing and the use of voice, and involved training of care staff. For the evaluation, data were drawn from 15 observations of the music sessions, reflective interviews with members of the care teams, staff questionnaires and online questionnaires for those musicians taking part. Thematic analysis of the results identified six themes: the need for collaboration between care home managers, musicians and care staff in delivering music sessions; differing responses to the intervention; empowering the residents and nurturing their identity; the integral part staff, musicians and the researcher played in the success of the intervention and its evaluation; the effect of the intervention on wellbeing; and residents, care staff and managers desire to continue the sessions in the future. The report found that carefully delivered music can provide significant benefits for older people, care staff and care settings, contributing to person-centred care. It found that regular music making can improve the working and living environment for care home residents and staff, and can provide positive social experiences. Music interventions can also play a key role in awakening a sense of identity and empowerment for care home residents. The report makes several recommendations, including that regular participatory music programmes be considered essential for all UK care homes.

A systematic review of outdoor recreation (in green space and blue space) for families to promote subjective wellbeing

MANSFIELD Lousie, et al
2018

This systematic review looks at the wellbeing outcomes when taking part in outdoor activities with family. Although there is existing evidence on the benefits being outdoors has for our wellbeing, there is less evidence of the wellbeing benefits when the time is spent with family. The review included empirical research assessing the relationship between outdoor recreation interventions for families and subjective wellbeing, published from 1997 - October 2017 and grey literature published from 2007-2017. The review reports on fifteen studies in total, including two quantitative, one mixed methods (RCT and interviews), and ten qualitative studies. Overall the review found the evidence base was limited with the number of studies and quality, especially for quantitative studies. The evidence from quantitative studies indicates that taking part in outdoor recreation with families has no significant effect on children's quality of life, and has no significant effect on self-esteem and other measures of psychological wellbeing. Initial evidence findings from qualitative studies showed more positive impacts when taking part in outdoor recreation with families, showing improved self-competence learning and identity; improved wellbeing via escapism, relaxation and sensory experience; and improved social bonding as a family. Analysis of survey data found that people's enjoyment of the outdoors is enhanced when they are spending time with family and friends, and in particular with partners.

Results 1 - 10 of 46

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