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Results for 'referral'

Results 1 - 10 of 11

The 'front door' to adult social care

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2019

To meet the aims of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, local authorities need to have created a comprehensive ‘front door’ to social care and to have in places an effective Information, Advice and Assistance (IAA) service. This audit report considers the effectiveness of IAA services in Wales, the availability of preventative and community-based support, and the systems put in place to ensure those who need care and support or are at risk are identified and helped. It also considers the impact of the front door on demand for social care and in respect of improving wellbeing. Although local authorities are supporting people to access a wider range of support options, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of what is available and the preventative services that are needed. It also found that carers are still not getting equal access to the services they need. Based on the findings, the report concludes that councils are preventing social-care demand, but there is variation in the availability, accessibility and quality of information, advice and assistance services. It makes recommendations to help improve access to information, advice and assistance services.

Service-users’ perspectives of link worker social prescribing: a qualitative follow-up study

WILDMAN Josephine M., et al
2019

Background: Social prescribing enables health-care professionals to address non-medical causes of ill-health by harnessing the resources of the voluntary and community sectors in patient care. Although increasingly popular in the UK, evidence for the effectiveness of social prescribing is inconclusive and longer-term studies are needed. This study aimed to explore experiences of social prescribing among people with long-term conditions one to two years after their initial engagement with a social prescribing service. Methods: Qualitative methods comprising semi-structured follow-up interviews were conducted with 24 users of a link worker social prescribing service who had participated in an earlier study. Participants were aged between 40 and 74 years and were living in a socioeconomically-deprived area of North East England. Results: Participants reported reduced social isolation and improvements in their condition management and health-related behaviours. However, many participants had experienced setbacks, requiring continued support to overcome problems due to multi-morbidity, family circumstances and social, economic or cultural factors. Findings indicated that, in this sample of people facing complex health and socioeconomic issues, longer-term intervention and support was required. Features of the link worker social prescribing intervention that were positively appraised by participants, included a highly personalised service to reflect individual goal setting priorities and a focus on gradual and holistic change dealing with issues beyond health. The important role of a strong and supportive relationship with an easily-accessible link worker in promoting sustained behaviour change highlights the importance of link worker continuity. A lack of suitable and accessible voluntary and community services for onward referral acted as a barrier to involvement for some participants. Conclusions: This study highlights issues of interest to commissioners and providers of social prescribing. Engagement with social prescribing for up to two years was examined and continued involvement was identified for those with complex issues, suggesting that a long-term intervention is required. The availability of onward referral services is an important consideration for social prescribing in a time of constrained public spending. From a research perspective, the range of improvements and their episodic nature suggest that the evaluation of social prescribing interventions requires both quantitative and qualitative data collected longitudinally.

Raising the bar on strength and balance: the importance of community-based provision

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2019

This report draws on work from the University of Manchester Healthy Ageing Research Group, which worked with communities to better understand the challenges of delivering strength and balance programmes for older adults in the local community. These activities could include resistance training, aerobics classes and yoga groups. The report argues that NHS falls rehabilitation services often don’t have the funding or ability to provide sufficient strength and balance programmes to meet existing needs, which means an effective community-based response is essential. The report presents different models of delivery of community-based activities, barriers to delivery and examples of innovative solutions identified during the project. The findings cover five themes: raising awareness, encouraging uptake, exercise referral pathways that work, sticking to the evidence, and monitoring for outcomes and improvements. Each theme highlights five key points to ensure that strength and balance exercise programmes are delivered to the right people, at the right time, and by the right people, so that older adults achieve positive results. Recommendations for commissioners, providers and health care professionals are also included. These include for NHS and local authorities support evidence-based programmes and for improved collaboration between those referring people to programmes and those delivering them.

Community Webs: final evaluation report

BROWN C., et al
2018

Evaluation of Community Webs, a pilot project funded by Bristol Ageing Better (BAB) and Better Care Bristol (BCB), a social prescribing service which enables GP patients to access social activities and non-medical support services available in their local community. The evaluation of used both qualitative and quantitative methods to understand the process of delivery, short-term outcomes for clients and key costs linked to the project. The evaluation findings include client profiles and patterns of service use, patient experience of the linkworker service, GP and practice staff perceptions of the service, and links between service participation and client outcomes. The main reasons for practitioners making referrals were social isolation, low confidence and self-esteem and practical support needs (including welfare benefits, housing and form filling). The results suggest that Community Webs is beneficial for patients and GPs, in particular through its person-centred methods which have resulted in significant improvements to patients’ health and wellbeing. Patients have been provided with the right information to help them to access social, emotional and practical support, and have been able to make positive choices regarding their broader health and wellbeing needs. GP’s and practice staff have demonstrated trust in the voluntary and community sector, and in social prescribing in particular, by continuing to refer their patients into the service. The report also highlights that there is no ‘one size fits all’ in relation to social prescribing services and the value of exploring both the individual and community ‘assets’. Learning and recommendations are included.

Facilitators and barriers of implementing and delivering social prescribing services: a systematic review

PESCHENY Julia Vera, PAPPAS Yannis, RANDHAWA Gurch
2018

Background: Social Prescribing is a service in primary care that involves the referral of patients with non-clinical needs to local services and activities provided by the third sector (community, voluntary, and social enterprise sector). Social Prescribing aims to promote partnership working between the health and the social sector to address the wider determinants of health. To date, there is a weak evidence base for Social Prescribing services. The objective of the review was to identify factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of SP services based in general practice involving a navigator. Methods: The search included eleven databases, the grey literature, and the reference lists of relevant studies to identify the barriers and facilitators to the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services in June and July 2016. Searches were limited to literature written in English. No date restrictions were applied. Findings were synthesised narratively, employing thematic analysis. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool Version 2011 was used to evaluate the methodological quality of included studies. Results: Eight studies were included in the review. The synthesis identified a range of factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of SP services. Facilitators and barriers were related to: the implementation approach, legal agreements, leadership, management and organisation, staff turnover, staff engagement, relationships and communication between partners and stakeholders, characteristics of general practices, and the local infrastructure. The quality of most included studies was poor and the review identified a lack of published literature on factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services. Conclusion: The review identified a range of factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services. Findings of this review provide an insight for commissioners, managers, and providers to guide the implementation and delivery of future Social Prescribing services. More high quality research and transparent reporting of findings is needed in this field.

Making sense of social prescribing

POLLEY Marie, et al
2017

This guide provides an overview of the key aspects of social prescribing. Commissioned by NHS England, the guide has been co-produced by people with practical experience of designing, commissioning and delivering social prescribing schemes. Sections of the guide cover: the definition and key components of social prescribing, the reasons for developing social prescribing schemes; examples of different models; what makes a good link worker; what makes a good referral; governance and risk management; and evaluating schemes. The guide also includes links to additional resources.

Ageing Better: social prescribing and older people: guide to developing development project plans

HOY Christine
2014

Developed as part of the Better Ageing project, this guide provides advice on developing social prescribing plans and approaches as a way of tackling loneliness in older people. It highlights the importance of ensuring that social prescribing initiatives sustainable by engaging the support of local groups such as general practices, voluntary and third sector organisations. It also highlights key stages of developing any plan. These include: the importance of empathy and awareness when holding initial conversations to link people with support; mapping local assets, groups and activities; developing ways to find and use information about local sources of support; the collection of evaluation data; use of digital technologies in social prescribing; and presenting local plans using appropriate language and vocabulary. It also suggests key areas that could be covered in social prescribing plans, such as governance and accountability, plan for local evaluation, local collaboration and training and support needs. Includes a list of useful links and resources.

Wigan community link worker service evaluation

INNOVATION UNIT
2016

Evaluation of the Wigan Community Link Worker (CLW) service, which was set up as a pilot in 2015 to improve the health and wellbeing of local people by helping them to access community based support and activities. It also helps those referred to use their skills and experience through volunteering. The evaluation, commissioned by Wigan Borough CCG and Wigan Council, aims to gain a better understanding of how the service is working, who is using it and what difference it is making to clients and referring services. The evaluation draws on an analysis of referral data, case studies and qualitative interviews with commissioners, people running services, patients, community link workers and representatives of voluntary and community organisations. Findings report high levels of commitment to the service from stakeholders, with health and care professionals valuing the service and promoting it to colleagues and clients. A total of 784 clients were supported between January 2015 and March 2016. Over half of these clients were over 55, with social isolation and mental health issues the most recurrent presenting issues, along with benefits and financial advice. The service is also used by number of carers. Client stories suggest that CLWs help them to feel supported and able to contribute in their community. The evaluation also found anecdotal evidence of reduced pressure on mainstream services. Recommendations include that the service retains it wide referral and low threshold for access; development of the skills of CLWs as relational workers through peer support and reflective practice; and enlists CLWs, clients and health professionals in co-designing and co-producing the service in the future.

Evaluation of Prevention Matters

APTELIGEN, et al
2015

An evaluation of Prevention Matters, a whole county change programme designed to facilitate access to frontline community services and groups in Buckinghamshire. The programme targets those whose needs are below the substantial need threshold for adult social care, building on a referral system, rather than on direct support. Fourteen Community Practice Workers (CPWs) are aligned to the seven GP localities in Buckinghamshire, and lead on the referral process, from first contact with the users to final review and exit. The CPWs are supported by seven Community Links Officers who ensure that the necessary resources are available in the community to meet users’ needs, including identification of opportunities to build new capacity. A wide network of frontline community services and groups provides direct face-to-face support to users through activities such as befriending, transport, fitness, and lunch clubs. The evaluation found that the potential to maintain independence and delay access to adult social care may be less than originally intended as a result of the complexity of the needs and frailty of some programme users. Nonetheless, nearly half of all programme users reported improvement in their satisfaction with the level of social contact they had and a third of programme users reported that their quality of life was better at the review stage compared to the time of their baseline assessment. In addition, the evaluation concluded that the programme has been particularly successful at facilitating access to information. The analysis indicates that the benefits associated with the programme are £1,000 per user per year, including the value of the improvements in health suggested by the impact evaluation (£500), and estimated spill-over effects on the need for informal social care (£492). The report also highlights the positive impact on organisations and systems, and increased volunteering capacity and sets out a series of recommendations to strengthen the delivery of the programme.

Social prescribing: a review of community referral schemes

THOMSON Linda J., CAMIC Paul M., CHATTERJEE Helen J.
2015

Sets the scene for the conditions under which social prescribing has arisen and considers the efficacy of different referral options. Social prescribing is a non-medical intervention linking patients with social, emotional or practical needs to a range of local, non-clinical services. The review provides definitions, models and notable examples of social prescribing schemes and assesses the means by which and the extent to which these schemes have been evaluated. Models outlined in this review include: Arts on Prescription, Books on Prescription, Education on Prescription, Exercise on Prescription, Green Gyms, Healthy Living Initiatives, Information Prescriptions, Museums on Prescription, Social Enterprise Schemes, Supported Referral, and Time Banks. The report makes recommendations for practice, policy and future research, focusing on best practice guidance for sector workers, frameworks for setting up social prescribing schemes, and methods for evaluating social prescribing schemes.

Results 1 - 10 of 11

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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