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Results for 'religions'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Building dementia-friendly faith communities: how faith groups are supporting people living with dementia, their families and their carers

GARLAND Rodie
2017

This booklet is a collection of case studies that illustrate how faith communities from different traditions help support people living with dementia and their carers; and how they can also help to prevent dementia from developing in the first place. Faith communities can offer spiritual and emotional support for individuals affected by dementia; practical support, including activities and services, opportunities for social interactions and support with day-to-day living, such as transport and help with taking medication correctly; and a dementia-friendly faith-community within the wider community and a supportive network of motivated people and resources. In addition, faith groups can play an important role in prevention, and in helping people with the things that will reduce their risk of developing dementia. They can do this by helping people to keep mentally active – through opportunities for social engagement, such as meeting others and volunteering; through stimulating their brains through activities such as reading; and through helping people to keep learning new things. Faith groups can also help people adopt and follow a healthier lifestyle, through stopping smoking, reducing alcohol consumption, and encouraging physical activity and healthy eating. The report makes a number of suggestions on what the health and care system should know about engaging with faith communities. This includes: finding out whom to engage within the community; making links with institutions that train faith leaders; and considering the need for different approaches in different communities.

Working with faith groups to promote health and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

This report, published in association with FaithAction, looks at how local authorities and faith groups can work together to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes of communities. It also highlights examples of good practice from across the country, and from different faiths, to demonstrate the wide range of activity taking place. The report covers how faith groups can improve health outcomes and tackle health inequalities; the benefits of joint working for councils, health organisations and faith groups; barriers to collaboration and what local authorities can do to make sure the widest range of groups are involved; and looks at ways of establishing effective partnerships and activities, including through adopting the national Faith Covenant. The report includes questions for councils and faith groups to assess whether there is more that can be done to work well together. It also signposts to useful resources for further learning and action.

The impact of faith-based organisations on public health and social capital

NOVEMBER Lucy
2014

Summarises research evidence on the relationship between faith and health, and on the role of faith communities in improving health and reducing health inequalities. It also provides an overview of faith in the UK and the health problems prevalent within different ethnic and faith communities. The literature was identified through searches carried out on a range of databases and organisational websites, and was structured into two ‘strands’. Strand one looks at how faith based organisations represent communities with poor health outcomes, and provide an opportunity for public health services to access these ‘hard to reach’ groups. Strand two looks at how the social and spiritual capital gained by belonging to a faith community can result in physical and mental health benefits and mitigate other determinants of poor health. Findings from the review included that regular engagement in religious activities is positively related to various aspects of wellbeing, and negatively associated with depressive symptoms. There was also evidence to show that volunteering can positively affect the health and wellbeing of volunteers, and that faith communities represent a large proportion of national volunteering. The report provides recommendations for faith-based organisations and public health bodies, on how they might work effectively in partnership to realise the potential for faith groups of improving health and wellbeing.

Conceptualizing spirituality and religion for mental health practice: perspectives of consumers with serious mental illness

STARNINO Vincent R.
2016

Studies show that a high percentage of people with serious mental illness (SMI) draw upon spirituality and religion, resulting in a call for practitioners to incorporate these as part of recovery-related services. A challenge is that there are differing definitions of spirituality and religion presented in the literature which could lead to confusion in practice settings. A qualitative study was conducted with 18 participants with SMI. Findings reveal that there are important nuances, and much overlap, related to how people with psychiatric disabilities define and conceptualize spirituality and religion. Three major conceptualisations of spirituality and religion are presented. Insights from this study are relevant to practitioners interested in incorporating spirituality as part of recovery-oriented practice.

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