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Results for 'residential care'

Results 1 - 10 of 13

Precious memories: a randomized controlled trial on the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention delivered by trained volunteers in residential care homes

WESTERHO Gerben J., et al
2018

Objectives: This study assesses the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention on the prevention and reduction of depressive symptoms in older persons in residential care. Trained volunteers delivered the intervention. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out with depressive symptoms as the primary outcome. The experimental condition received the intervention Precious Memories one-on-one, whereas the control condition had individual unstructured contacts with a volunteer. Participants were 86 older persons living in residential care. There were three measurements: pre-intervention, post-intervention (2 months after the first measurement), and follow-up (8 months after the first measurement). Besides depressive symptoms, the retrieval of specific positive memories was measured as a process variable. Anxiety, loneliness, well-being, and mastery were assessed as secondary outcomes. Results: Depressive symptoms improved equally in the intervention and the control condition at post-measurement. Participants with clinically relevant depressive symptoms also maintained the effects at follow-up in both conditions. The retrieval of specific positive memories improved more in the autobiographical memory intervention, although this was not maintained at follow-up. Anxiety and loneliness improved equally well in both conditions, but no effects were found for well-being or mastery. Conclusion: It is concluded that volunteers can deliver the intervention and contribute to the mental health of this highly vulnerable group of older adults.

Creativity in care: evaluation report

CITY ARTS
2014

An evaluation of Creativity in Care, a programme commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council which explored creative approaches to promoting well-being for older people in care and ways of overcoming the barriers that face staff, carers and homes in trying to provide creative and imaginative environments for older people. This report reviews the outcomes of three aspects of the programme: the artist residency, creative mentoring and training. It also sets out recommendations based on the findings. The evaluation identifies the main learning outcomes of the programme as: learning – new approaches were developed by staff resulting in improved motivation and engagement of residents; social skills – positive interaction between residents increased, with one to one work supporting social engagement for the more isolated residents; and value – an improved sense of wellbeing was gained through participation in the arts, with improved levels of confidence and increased decision making; Legacy - the programme led to improved communication, networking and sharing between care homes. Training was also accessed by residential care staff to put into practice beyond the life of the programme.

Residents and volunteers: sharing the learning

ABBEYFIELD SOCIETY, AVISON Tracey Berridge, JARVIS Sunnie
2018

This good practice guide shares some of the practical learning from those involved in the Residents as Volunteers project, which supported older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. The guide summarises some of the emotional, social, mental and physical health benefits for residents involved in the project. It then provides advice for getting residents and staff ready to take part in volunteering initiatives; provides ideas to help overcome barriers to volunteering; and ways of identifying volunteering opportunities both inside and outside the home. Case studies from three sites who took part in the Residents as Volunteers project are included: Drake Lodge, Abbeyfield Tavistock Society, Abbeyfield The Dales Society, and Abbeyfield Retirement Living in Nottingham are also included.

Residents as volunteers: final evaluation report

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS, HORNUNG Lisa
2018

An evaluation of the Residents as Volunteers project, which aimed to support older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer and to measure the impact of volunteering on well-being and quality of life. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. A total of 110 residents volunteered during the project. Those participating felt that volunteering had a positive impact on their emotional and social well-being and many also reported that volunteering helped them to stay physically and mentally active. The evaluation identified a number of barriers to volunteering faced by care home residents. These included feeling too old, having a health condition, lack of confidence, narrow views of volunteering or anti-volunteering sentiment. The project also found it was far more difficult to reach residents that had never volunteered before. It also identified barriers for staff and care homes themselves, including existing social interactions, staff to resident ratio, existing volunteering culture and non-supportive environment or lack of management buy-in. The report makes some suggestions to overcome these barriers.

Live music in care: the impact of music interventions for people living and working in care home settings

TAPSON Christine, et al
2018

An evaluation of a music intervention in five care homes in the UK in order to investigate the impact on older residents, staff and the care home environment. The programme, which was delivered by Live Music Now, consisted of an 11-session interactive weekly music programme focussed on singing and the use of voice, and involved training of care staff. For the evaluation, data were drawn from 15 observations of the music sessions, reflective interviews with members of the care teams, staff questionnaires and online questionnaires for those musicians taking part. Thematic analysis of the results identified six themes: the need for collaboration between care home managers, musicians and care staff in delivering music sessions; differing responses to the intervention; empowering the residents and nurturing their identity; the integral part staff, musicians and the researcher played in the success of the intervention and its evaluation; the effect of the intervention on wellbeing; and residents, care staff and managers desire to continue the sessions in the future. The report found that carefully delivered music can provide significant benefits for older people, care staff and care settings, contributing to person-centred care. It found that regular music making can improve the working and living environment for care home residents and staff, and can provide positive social experiences. Music interventions can also play a key role in awakening a sense of identity and empowerment for care home residents. The report makes several recommendations, including that regular participatory music programmes be considered essential for all UK care homes.

'My nature' - an effective tool for residential care

BREWIN Wendy, ORR Noreen, GARSIDE Ruth
2018

Experiencing nature is increasingly recognised as having a positive impact on the health and wellbeing of older people living in care homes. This practice example of "My Nature" activities toolkit designed to solve the problem of access to green spaces, which can be difficult for older people with dementia in care homes. Sensory Trust and the University of Exeter collaborated on developing 'My Nature', an evidence based training toolkit to help care staff identify ways in which nature can not only play a role in a resident's care plan but also support them in their work. The toolkit consists of: evidence booklets, nature based activities and a wall chart. The toolkit was piloted and then evaluated to see how far it could achieve the health and wellbeing gains that access to nature can provide. Two care homes in Cornwall participated in the pilot. Activities demonstrated in the pilots include: nature palettes, nature mapping, painting by nature and a tea tasting party. Key findings from the evaluation: the activities succeeded in getting residents out into the gardens and also stimulated interaction, enjoyment and pleasure. For staff, the activities proved to be adaptable to different contexts, could be planned in advanced and person-centred. Challenges identified include: the activities did not appear to appeal to male residents and care home culture.

Arts in care homes: a rapid mapping of training provision

ALLEN Penny
2018

This report uses desk research, interviews and online searches to map creative training provision available to artists and staff working in care homes in the UK. The mapping took place in 2017 and identified examples of good practice, innovative delivery, and opportunities for growth and development. It total, 65 providers of training were identified, delivering training in person or online. Training was aimed at artists, health/care providers, volunteers, arts venues, activity coordinators and friends/family. Seven main types of training opportunity identified: toolkits; one-off workshops; whole home and leadership training; maintenance models; mentoring; networks and peer learning; and conferences. The results highlight the diverse nature of the sector and the multiple pathways for people to access training, which present both challenges and opportunities for training providers. The author also highlights variation in quality of provision and argues for a system of accreditation. Case study examples are included throughout the report, and appendices provide links to a range of toolkits and providers.

Homemade circus handbook

UPSWING
2018

Homemade Circus is a project that uses circus to improve the health and wellbeing of older people. This booklet enables care homes and day centres to try out some simple circus games themselves. It includes advice on running activities such as juggling games, push hands, scarf juggling and feather balancing. Each activity is described as a progression, starting with simple movements and actions that require very little verbal instruction. The guide also provides advice on opening and closing activity sessions. The activities provide an opportunity for residents and carers to have fun together, learn new skills and try something new. The activities also support the interaction and co-operation between participants and staff.

Effectiveness of complex falls prevention interventions in residential aged care settings: a systematic review

FRANCIS-COAD Jacqueline, et al
2018

Objective: The objective of this review was to synthesize the best available evidence for the effectiveness of complex falls prevention interventions delivered at two or more of the following levels: resident, facility or organization, on fall rates in the residential aged care (RAC) population. Introduction: Preventing falls in the high risk RAC population is a common global goal with acknowledged complexity. Previous meta-analyses have not specifically addressed complexity, described as falls prevention intervention delivery at multiple levels of a RAC organization, to determine its effect on fall outcomes. Inclusion criteria: The current review considered studies that included participants who were aged 65 years and over residing in long-term care settings providing 24-hour supervision and/or care assistance. Studies that evaluated complex falls prevention interventions delivered by single discipline or multidisciplinary teams across at least two or all of the following levels: residents, RAC facility and RAC organization were eligible. Experimental study designs including randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and quasi-experimental trials that reported on measures related to fall incidence were considered, namely, rate of falls (expressed as the number of falls per 1000 occupied bed days), the number of participants who became fallers (expressed as the number of participants who fell once or more) and the rate of injurious falls (expressed as the number of falls with injury per 1000 occupied bed days). Methods: A three-step search strategy was undertaken, commencing with an initial scoping search of MEDLINE and CINAHL databases prior to an extensive search of all relevant published literature, clinical trial registries and gray literature. Two independent reviewers assessed selected studies for methodological validity using the standardized critical appraisal instrument from the Joanna Briggs Institute System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information (JBI SUMARI). Data were extracted from the selected studies using the standardized data extraction tool from JBI SUMARI. Quantitative data were pooled in statistical meta-analysis for rate of falls, the number of participants who became fallers and the rate of injurious falls. Meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model with heterogeneity assessed using the standard Chi-squared and I2 index. Where statistical pooling was not possible, study findings were presented in narrative form. Results: Twelve studies were included in this review with seven being eligible for meta-analysis. Complex falls prevention interventions delivered at multiple levels in RAC populations did not show a significant effect in reducing fall rates (MD = −1.29; 95% CI [−3.01, 0.43]), or the proportion of residents who fell (OR = 0.76; 95% CI [0.42, 1.38]). However, a sensitivity analysis suggested complex falls prevention interventions delivered with additional resources at multiple levels had a significant positive effect in reducing fall rates (MD = −2.26; 95% CI [−3.72, −0.80]). Conclusions: Complex falls prevention interventions delivered at multiple levels in the RAC population may reduce fall rates when additional staffing, expertise or resources are provided. Organizations may need to determine how resources can be allocated to best address falls prevention management. Future research should continue to investigate which combinations of multifactorial interventions are effective.

Evaluation of the volunteering in care homes project: summary report

HILL Matthew
2016

Summary report of an evaluation of the Volunteering in Care Homes (ViCH) project, which examines the impact of volunteering on residents, staff and volunteers and also explores the implications for developing volunteering in care homes more generally. The project was piloted in fourteen care homes, which placed trained volunteers in befriending and activity-based roles. The evaluation found good subjective evidence from staff and volunteer surveys of that befriending and activity-based volunteering roles have major positive impacts for residents in care homes, especially around social and emotional wellbeing. The majority of staff surveyed also felt the involvement of volunteers has a positive impact on their job, in terms of job satisfaction, retention and levels of stress. The evaluation also looked at the cost-effectiveness of the approach. The project had high start-up costs, with a positive ongoing value ratio achieved 18 months into the project. In order to deliver positive impacts for residents and staff, the project found that volunteers need to be effectively recruited, sufficiently trained, well matched and receive substantial ongoing support and coordination. Other factors identified that need to be addressed to enable volunteer engagement to become well established across the sector, include strategic leadership, culture change, good practice learning, financial resources and regulatory incentives.

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