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Results for 'self care'

Results 1 - 10 of 11

Community Team Plus

Stoke on Trent City Council

Community Team Plus involves multidisciplinary health and care teams supporting people across six Stoke on Trent localities to 'help me to help myself to live well'. They are tasked with being accessible, creative, resourceful and helpful.

Enabling change through communities of practice: Wellbeing Our Way

KOUSSA Natalie
2017

Summarises learning from a National Voices programme, Wellbeing Our Way, which aimed to explore how communities of practice could contribute to large-scale change across the health and care voluntary and community sector. The programme brought together people from charities, community organisations and people with experience of using health and care services to enable people to increase their knowledge and skills around a range of person- and community-centred approaches. The report provides an overview and learning from the national communities of practice and from two place-based communities of practice in Greater Manchester, which focused on peer support and self-management. Key learning for facilitating change through communities of practice identified includes: the importance of co-design; good facilitation; identifying specific expertise within the community of practice; having a clear area of focus of the community; having a clearly defined goal when looking to enable organisational change; and involving senior leaders to increase the chance of encouraging change. Individuals involved in the programme also explain how it has helped them initiate change in their practice and organisation. Results from the programme evaluation found that 79 per cent of participants were able to increase their knowledge and skills and 64 per cent were enabled, partly enabled, to create change in their organisation.

Mobilising communities: insights on community action for health and wellbeing

KERN Ruth, HOLMAN Annette
2017

Summarises key insights from the Mobilising Communities programme, which explored ways of implementing ‘social movements' in health that bring together people's strengths and capacity, community resources and publicly funded services to improve health and wellbeing in communities. The three sites participating in the programme were: the Bromley by Bow Centre and Health Partnership; Spice and Lancashire County Council; and Horsham and Mid Sussex Clinical Commissioning Group. The report briefly summarises the approaches taken by the three sites, which include social prescribing, Time Banking and peer support. The three elements identified as the most important in supporting communities to develop social movements in health were: helping people help themselves; creating opportunities for people to help one another, and creating value between the professional and social spheres. The report shows how each of the three elements can be developed to support a social movement in health for people and communities. Appendices provide flow diagrams to illustrate how each of the three sites implemented the approach. The programme was funded by the government’s Social Action team and delivered by Nesta Health Lab and the Behavioral Insights Team (BIT).

ExtraCare's Wellbeing Programme

The ExtraCare Charitable Trust

ExtraCare’s Wellbeing Programme was developed in 2002, in partnership with older people who live at ExtraCare’s Schemes and Villages. The concept was launched following a survey, which highlighted that 75% of residents at one location had not accessed any health screening via their GPs or the NHS. A pilot screening scheme subsequently identified 122 previously undetected conditions amongst a population of just 136, highlighting a clear need for the Programme.

Helping people look after themselves: a guide on self care

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Brings together eight case studies which show how local authorities in England are involved in a range of innovative schemes to encourage self-care and self-management of long term conditions. The case studies covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. The examples include: a network of integrated teams to work with residents at risk; development of a website to help people with long-term conditions to become more involved in self-care; a hotline to promote health lifestyles and self-care, linking people with local services in the local authority, NHS and voluntary sector; a programme to tackle loneliness and social isolation in older people, improve health and wellbeing; Nottingham’s ‘super’ self-care pilot, which includes social prescribing and care navigators; and work in Kirklees which is encouraging the self-management of long term conditions through education, technology, exercise and one-on-one help.

Making the change: behavioural factors in person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

BURD Hannah, HALLSWORTH Michael
2016

This report explores the behavioural science theories that suggest new ways of enabling people and communities to take a more active role in managing their own health and provides an accessible introduction to the theories of change. The report is structured around the three areas of capability, opportunity and motivation which researchers have identified as needing to be present for behaviour to occur. It highlights that a multi-faceted approach is needed to enable effective self-care. It identifies five enabling factors that that can influence engagement and self-management behaviours: a growth mindset where people view capabilities as something that can be developed, removing ‘friction costs’, social networks, motivation and goal setting. It also suggests how these factors can be targeted in order to encourage these behaviours. Examples and case studies illustrate the application of the theories. The report is aimed at policymakers, commissioners, service designers and organisations working to promote more person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing.

Social prescribing: a review of the evidence

KINSELLA Sarah
2016

A brief review of the literature on social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking primary care patients with psycho-social issues, with sources of appropriate, non-medical support in the community. Suitable referrals to social prescribing initiatives are vulnerable and at risk groups such as: people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety; low income single parents; recently bereaved older people; people with long term conditions and frequent attendees in primary and secondary care. The review highlights that prescribed activities have typically included arts and creative activities, physical activity, learning and volunteering opportunities and courses, self-care and support with practical issues such as benefits, housing, debt and employment. The evidence on the impact of social prescribing is currently limited and inconsistent. While some initiatives have shown improved outcomes for patients and potential for cost-savings (in the longer term), few have been subject to economic analysis or the kind of rigorous evaluation which would inform commissioners. The report recommends that any new, local social prescribing initiatives should aim to add to the current evidence base and conduct transparent and thorough.

The value of peer support on cognitive improvement amongst older people living with dementia

CHAKKALACKAL Lauren
2014

Peer support can play a critical role in improving the wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies of older people living with dementia. This paper describes selected findings from the Mental Health Foundation’s evaluation of three peer support groups for people living with dementia in extra-care housing schemes. It highlights the groups as a promising approach for maintaining cognitive faculties, reducing social isolation, increasing social networks and improving overall wellbeing. A mixed-method study design examined the impact of the groups on participants’ wellbeing, managing memory, independent living skills and social support. Participants reported positive impact from taking part in the support groups for wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies. Participants also reported positive benefits of the groups on communication abilities, managing memory and managing their lives. Peer support groups in extra-care housing schemes address the psychological, social and emotional needs of people with dementia. This evaluation adds to the literature on the effectiveness of these interventions for those with cognitive impairment.

The NHS in 2030: a vision of a people-powered, knowledge-powered health system

BLAND Jessica
2015

This report explores four big ways that knowledge power and people power will affect the NHS in 2030 and the wider health system, through precision medicine, new forms of health data, people–powered health, and the use of behavioural insights. Section 1, in particular, concentrates on where new kinds of medical information about individuals will come from, as well as how it is interpreted in stratified care. Section 2 moves onto people managing their own health information and new digital platforms for supporting patient–led research and care. Section 3 looks at the possibility of a social movement for health: people being trusted to have a more active role in their own health and to look after others, supported by the NHS, as well as people supporting health services. Section 4 explores how insights into human behaviours can help redesign health services, products and treatments in a way that reflects better how people live their lives and make choices. This is followed by a summary of how these developments will change the function of the NHS. The final sections focus on the challenges involved in getting to the best version of this future and ideas for how these changes can be supported today. Concentrating on the widest gaps between these ideas and current policy, the conclusion includes four proposals that would support new functions in the health system. These are: developing digital platforms and widely agreed protocols for developing new kinds of health knowledge; creating prototypes for health data sharing that concentrate on understanding emerging attitudes to digital privacy; establishing an institution that supports and evaluates people powered health research; and creating a central institution to set standards and mandate processes that will maximise the clinical and research value of large genomic and other data sets as they become available.

Supporting self-management: summarising evidence from systematic reviews

NATIONAL VOICES
2014

This booklet sets out research findings of the benefits of supporting people to self-manage. It also sets out the evidence for the impact of self-management education for patients, proactive telephone and psychosocial support, home-based self-monitoring and simplified dosing strategies and information. Self-management includes all the actions taken by people to recognise, treat and manage their own healthcare independently of or in partnership with the healthcare system. People feel more confident and engaged when they are encouraged to self-manage by professionals, therefore supporting self-management is key to prioritising person-centred care. Drawing on the findings from 228 systematic reviews, the paper concludes that the top three things that might most usefully be invested in are disease specific, generic and on-line self-management courses, proactive telephone support and self monitoring of symptoms and vital signs.

Results 1 - 10 of 11

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