Coronavirus guidance for social care and social work

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'service provision'

Results 1 - 10 of 14

Implementing the Care Act 2014:building social resources to prevent, reduce or delay needs for care and support in adult social care in England

TEWA Jerry, et al
2019

This Report is based on research into ‘second wave’ approaches to prevention and capacity building that have become more prominent since the implementation of the Care Act 2014. These approaches involve a fundamental revisioning of the role of local services and seek to maximise resources and opportunities through working in more co-productive ways with citizens, families and communities. The findings are based on a national survey of local authorities and in-depth case study research with stakeholders, beneficiaries and family members in seven local authorities which were promoting one or more ‘second wave’ preventative initiatives. A key findings was that a preventative focus is still relatively new in adult social care and that approaches are often embedded within a variety of strategic initiatives, including: strengths-based models of social work and social care practice (such as 3 Conversations); approaches to social networking and building community capacity (such as Local Area Coordination); mobilising the resources of family and personal networks (through approaches such as Family Group Conferencing, peer support or Community Circles) and targeted ‘upstream’ use of personal budgets. Another finding was that overall, financial pressures were seen as the most important driver towards developing preventative activity, but, at the same time, this was also cited most frequently as the greatest barrier. Other frequently cited barriers to progressing the prevention agenda were competing policy imperatives and, in particular, perceived pressure to make rushed decisions in order to minimise delays in hospital discharge. The report also examines wellbeing outcomes and expenditure. The report makes recommendations for the policy, practice and implementation and evaluation contexts. The reports concludes that there is some strong evidence of the creativity and innovation that is taking place in a significant proportion of local authorities. While progress may not be consistent across the sector, the research shows that a sizable proportion of local authorities have been investing in activity that is designed to increase capacity and capability at individual, family and community levels, and thereby to contribute to preventing, reducing or delaying the need for adult social care services.

'Care navigation' is being widely adopted in primary care, but in varying ways

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. Dissemination Centre
2020

This NIHR Signal focuses on a study to explore how care navigation is being implemented by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in England. Care navigation in primary care helps people with non-medical issues to access alternative services. This social prescribing also aims to reduce the pressure on general practice. The research surveyed CCGs in England about who provided care navigation, which types of patients were referred to care navigators and how, and whether this service was being evaluated. A total of 193 CCGs responded to the survey, with 162 provided usable data. The study shows that the role is fulfilled in different ways by people with a wide variety of job titles. This may make it harder for patients to understand what the role is and how it can help them. Only a third of CCGs who responded have assessed the use of care navigators or have plans to assess their impact.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: final report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

This report summarises the evidence on nine identified interventions to support older people. It is the final report of a project to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. The focus is on the use of social care services, but the report also reviews interventions which also reduced the need for health services. The ROI includes nine interventions, identified though a literature review. They are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, which use social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. An accompanying technical report provides further detail of the literature review, selection of the interventions for inclusion in the tool and the modelling methods. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and presents results showing the economic benefits of each intervention.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: technical report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

The technical report of a project which aimed to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. This report provides detail of the literature review process, the process of assessment and prioritisation of interventions for inclusion in the tool, and the detailed modelling methods used. Based on evidence from the literature review and through discussion with expert Steering Group members, nine interventions are included in the ROI tool. These are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, using social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching delivered by inter-professional health and social care services; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and shows the economic benefits of each intervention.

Strategy for preventing and ending homelessness

WALES. Welsh Government
2019

A policy statement setting out the approach the Welsh Government is taking to prevent and address homelessness in Wales. The Government aims to re-shape services around a rapid re-housing approach and towards long term housing led solutions, away from the provision of emergency, temporary and hostel services. The statement will be supported by an annual action plan setting out the measures which will be taken across Government.

10 tips to help your project reduce loneliness

KAZIMIRSKI Anne, ABRAMS Thomas, MAN Michelle
2019

This guide shares insights from the existing evidence base on promising approaches to delivering programmes to combat loneliness. It focuses on how services are delivered, rather than what they deliver, and provides tips on what is more likely to make interventions effective. The tips are grouped into four themes which cover: Involving users; Building new relationships; Reducing stigma; and Reducing barriers to access. It includes advice on: working with volunteers, building on local assets and strengths, using language carefully, focussing on the neighbourhood, facilitating transport, and using digital technology. Warnings are included where there are common pitfalls. Short practice examples and a list of additional resources are also included.

Social prescribing and community-based support: summary guide

NHS ENGLAND
2019

A guide provides best practice advice for people and organisations leading local implementation of social prescribing. It describes what good social prescribing looks like and how it can improve outcomes for people, their families and carers, as well as achieving more value from the system. It considers what needs to be in place locally to implement social prescribing, commission local social prescribing connector schemes and enable agencies refer people with wider social needs to community-based support. It will enable collaborative working amongst local partners at a ‘place-based’ local level, to recognise the value of community groups and assets and to enable people to build or rebuild friendships, community connections and a sense of belonging, as well as accessing existing services. Includes a draft job description and person specification for a Social prescribing link worker.

Tackling loneliness and social isolation: the role of commissioners

HOLMES Pamela, THOMSON Lousia
2018

This briefing explores the opportunities and barriers faced by commissioners seeking to address loneliness and social isolation in older people. It identifies evidence that points the way to a better understanding of effective interventions to tackle loneliness and social isolation, provides examples of emerging practice across the country, and examines what needs to happen next to improve the commissioning environment, and the changes that need to happen in other parts of society. It draws on discussions from a seminar organised by SCIE and Renaisi attended by commissioners, local authorities and third sector representatives, as well as the findings from previous research and evaluation.

Prevention in action: how prevention and integration are being understood and prioritised locally in England

FIELD Olivia
2017

This report provides a picture of local developments in preventative services in England and highlights examples of good practice. It aimed to explore the extent to which local authorities, sustainability and transformation partnerships, and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention, as well as to better understand how and to what extent local decision makers are integrating health and social care. The methodology included a review of joint health and wellbeing strategies and sustainability and transformation plans, and a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to local authorities. The report finds that while local authorities across England have made efforts to implement preventative services and identifies examples of innovation and good practice, the Care Act’s vision for prevention is not being fully realised and that local authorities in England need to provide more services that prevent, reduce or delay the need for care and support. The report also identified shortcomings in plans for integrating health and social care. Barriers to implementing preventive services include: a lack of clarity on what is meant by prevention and integration, resistance to cultural change, and reduced resources. The report makes recommendations to support a better and integrated, preventative care system.

Building bridges: bringing councils, communities and independent funders into dialogue

GILBERT Abigail
2017

This report highlights the need for collaboration between local organisations and local government in order to secure the wellbeing of communities at a time of increasing pressure facing local government budgets and increasing demand for services. The report found that councils need to work more closely with other funders of civil society, and communities, to enable change. It shows that effective collaboration between independent funders and local government can result in more intelligent, inclusive commissioning, more innovation at scale, better distribution and use of assets within localities, and more participation and engagement with communities. It also identifies potential barriers to collaboration, which include: a lack of a shared sense of purpose; a lack of consensus on what effective prevention looks like; and both councils and funders wanting to maintain their independence and reputation. The report makes a number of recommendations to improve collaboration. These include: for local authorities to have a senior officer responsible for developing funding; for elected members to building bridges between the council and independent funders; and for independent funders, such as charitable trusts, to work collaboratively with councils in order to define what ‘good’ service delivery looks like. Although the evidence for this report is focused on London, many of the findings and messages will be relevant to a wider audience.

Results 1 - 10 of 14

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#