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Results for 'service users'

Results 1 - 10 of 14

Ringing the changes: the role of telephone communication in a helpline and befriending service targeting loneliness in older people

PRESTON Claire, MOORE Stephen
2019

The drive to deliver services addressing loneliness in older people by telephone and online makes it increasingly relevant to consider how the mode of communication affects the way people interact with services and the capacity of services to meet their needs. This paper is based on the qualitative strand of a larger mixed-methods study of a national phoneline tackling loneliness in older people in the United Kingdom. The research comprised thematic analysis of four focus groups with staff and 42 semi-structured interviews with callers. It explored the associations between telephone-delivery, how individuals used the services and how the services were able to respond. To understand these associations, it was useful to identify some constituent characteristics of telephone communication in this context: namely its availability, reach and non-visual nature. This enabled various insights and comparison with other communication media. For example, the availability of the services attracted people seeking frequent emotional support but this presented challenges to staff. More positively, the ability of the services to connect disparate individuals enabled them to form different kinds of satisfying relationships. The evolution of mixed communication forms, such as internet-based voice communication and smartphone-based visual communication, makes analysis at the level of a technology's characteristics useful. Such a cross-cutting perspective can inform both the design of interventions and assessment of their suitability for different manifestations of loneliness.

Service-users’ perspectives of link worker social prescribing: a qualitative follow-up study

WILDMAN Josephine M., et al
2019

Background: Social prescribing enables health-care professionals to address non-medical causes of ill-health by harnessing the resources of the voluntary and community sectors in patient care. Although increasingly popular in the UK, evidence for the effectiveness of social prescribing is inconclusive and longer-term studies are needed. This study aimed to explore experiences of social prescribing among people with long-term conditions one to two years after their initial engagement with a social prescribing service. Methods: Qualitative methods comprising semi-structured follow-up interviews were conducted with 24 users of a link worker social prescribing service who had participated in an earlier study. Participants were aged between 40 and 74 years and were living in a socioeconomically-deprived area of North East England. Results: Participants reported reduced social isolation and improvements in their condition management and health-related behaviours. However, many participants had experienced setbacks, requiring continued support to overcome problems due to multi-morbidity, family circumstances and social, economic or cultural factors. Findings indicated that, in this sample of people facing complex health and socioeconomic issues, longer-term intervention and support was required. Features of the link worker social prescribing intervention that were positively appraised by participants, included a highly personalised service to reflect individual goal setting priorities and a focus on gradual and holistic change dealing with issues beyond health. The important role of a strong and supportive relationship with an easily-accessible link worker in promoting sustained behaviour change highlights the importance of link worker continuity. A lack of suitable and accessible voluntary and community services for onward referral acted as a barrier to involvement for some participants. Conclusions: This study highlights issues of interest to commissioners and providers of social prescribing. Engagement with social prescribing for up to two years was examined and continued involvement was identified for those with complex issues, suggesting that a long-term intervention is required. The availability of onward referral services is an important consideration for social prescribing in a time of constrained public spending. From a research perspective, the range of improvements and their episodic nature suggest that the evaluation of social prescribing interventions requires both quantitative and qualitative data collected longitudinally.

The community navigators study: loneliness in people with complex anxiety or depression

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2018

The summary findings of a study which developed a Community Navigators programme to reduce loneliness for people with anxiety or depression using secondary mental health services. The study also explores the views of participants and mental health services to the intervention and the feasibility of evaluating the programme using a randomised controlled trial. Forty participants with anxiety or depression were recruited and randomised to an intervention group (n=30), who received the programme in addition to standard care, or a control group (n=10), who received standard care and written information about local community resources. Community Navigators were recruited to help people develop new social connections, and to revive or develop existing social relationships with the aim of reducing feelings of loneliness. The study found the intervention was well received by service users. Outcomes indicate that the intervention has potential to reduce loneliness and depression.

Evaluation of the Rotherham mental health social prescribing service 2015/16/-2016/17

DAYSON Chris, BENNETT Ellen
2017

Updated findings of an independent evaluation of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Mental Health Service, a service to help users of secondary mental health services build their own packages of support by accessing voluntary activity in the community. Voluntary activities covered four broad themes: befriending and peer support, education and training, community activity groups and therapeutic services. The service was delivered in partnership by Rotherham, Doncaster and South Humber NHS Foundation Trust (RDASH) and a group of local voluntary sector organisations led by Voluntary Action Rotherham. The evaluation looks at the impact of the service on the well-being of service users, the wider outcomes and social benefits, the impact of the service on discharge from secondary mental health services and explores the potential economic benefits of the service. It reports that over the two years of the evaluation, the service had engaged with more than 240 users of secondary mental health services in Rotherham. The service made a significant and positive impact on the well-being of mental health service users, with more than 90 per cent of service users making progress against at least one wellbeing outcome measure. Service users also experienced a range of wider benefits, including taking part in training, volunteering, taking up physical activity and sustained involvement in voluntary sector activity. Initial evidence about discharge from mental health services was also positive. The evaluation estimates that the well-being benefits experienced by service users equate to social value of up to £724,000: a social return on investment of £1.84 for every £1 invested in the service.

Person-centred approaches: empowering people to live their lives and communities to enable to upgrade in prevention, wellbeing, health, care and support

SKILLS FOR HEALTH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2017

This education and training framework, commissioned by Health Education England, sets out core skills to support health and social care workforce to deliver person-centred approaches. It will help to staff communicate meaningfully, ensure they tailor the care and advice they give to suit peoples’ needs. It is applicable across services, sectors and across different types of organisations. The framework begins by describing the values, communication and relationship building skills that everyone delivering services should have to ensure consistent person-centred approaches. It arranges these into three ‘steps’: conversations to engage with people; conversations to enable and support people; and conversations with people to collaboratively manage highest complexity and significant risk. Within each step, the framework outlines behaviours which aim to illustrate what people and their carers would see in practice; learning outcomes; and short practice examples. Where appropriate, the framework encourages shared decision making and ensuring that all information is personalised, accessible and useful. The framework includes tips for delivering training and enablers for embedding a person-centred approach in organisations. The framework has been developed with the participation of health and social care experts and people who are experts by experience.

The crises facing our independent living service users: research, evaluation and impact

BLANCHARD Catherine, BRITTAIN Andrea
2016

British Red Cross Independent Living services such as Support at Home, Home from Hospital, and Mobility Aids provide time-limited support to help people live independently in their own home. This study explores the challenges facing people using these services, whose increasingly complex needs are creating greater obstacles to their ability to live independently. Phase one of the study conducted interviews with 29 service users, eight volunteers and 22 staff members into the problems service users face to living independently. Phase two used follow up questionnaires with 170 service users to explore key issues in more depth, including carers, mobility, information and advice, social isolation and loneliness. The results of the questionnaires found high levels of mobility reported-difficulties, which could impact on people's ability to maintain existing relationships and over half of respondents found difficult to find information and advice; The research also found that high numbers of service users live alone and also have high levels of social isolation and loneliness that require long-term intervention. Of the167 service users who answered questions on social isolation, 64 per cent experienced 'some' social isolation and a quarter fell into the 'most isolated' group. Drawing on findings, the report makes recommendations for the Independent Living service in relation to service development, advocacy and communications and data collection. These include: for services to be person-centred, consider partnerships and employ good practice in signposting; for the collection of data on whether people live alone, how long they have lived alone; and being clear in communications that loneliness and social isolation are different concepts.

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report

MUIR Rick, QUILTER-PINNER Harry
2015

This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

Assisted living technology and services: a learning development framework

SKILLS FOR CARE
2013

A learning and development framework to support those involved in the commissioning, design or delivery of workforce development. The framework aims to help ensure that the social care workforce has the skills and knowledge to use assisted living technology to enhance the lives of vulnerable people and their carers. Five stages provide the structure for the framework: Readiness; Customer Flow Analysis (guidance to assist the identification of work or service flow in your or your partner's organisation); Workforce Analysis (which provides guidance on how to map tasks and roles to knowledge and skills needed); Learning Design and Delivery (providing tools and resources for learning) and Checking (helping to evaluate the impact of learning). The framework also provides definitions, terminology and language that can be used by all when preparing workforce development products in the assistive living technology field.

Maximising the potential for the use of assistive technology: an information toolkit to support people with dementia, their carers and dementia services

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES, IMPROVEMENT AND EFFICIENCY WEST MIDLANDS, COMMUNITY GATEWAY CIC
2013

Assistive Technology is “any product or service designed to enable independence for disabled and older people, and their carers”, or “any device or system that allows individuals to perform tasks that they would otherwise be unable to do, or increases the ease and safety with which tasks can be performed”. This guide brings together references and guides, many of which support more accurate assessment of need and which explain how assistive technology can support either people with dementia or their families or indeed carers. An emphasis is placed on case studies as examples of the application of technology solutions designed around the person, so the examples are highly personalised and tailored to individual needs.

Recovery-focused practice in mental health

LEESE Daniela, SMITHIES Lynda, GREEN Julie
2014

This article aims to identify service users and nurses perspectives on recovery -focused practice through themes in the literature. Seven studies and two reflective articles were selected for consideration. Three common themes emerged as essential nursing characteristics needed for recovery-focused practice: hope, person-centred care and consideration of service users' perspective. Recommendations on how practice could be improved are suggested from these themes. Key points include involving family members in care, involving service users in decisions, and spending time with service users to aid recovery.

Results 1 - 10 of 14

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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