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Results for 'short break care'

Results 1 - 8 of 8

The Me, Myself and I Club: Briton Ferry: a case study in warm humanity and meaningful co-production

ME MYSELF AND I CLUB
2018

Describes the development and achievements of the Me, Myself and I Club, an initiative based on co-production principles and designed to support people with dementia and their carers. The club offers carers and people with dementia the opportunity to meet up with other local people in their position, enjoy activities like bingo, baking and table tennis and access respite care services, including relationship-centred short breaks in the local community that do not require the separation of carers from the people they support. The ethos of the club is to challenge negative stereotypes of people with dementia and the traditional service culture which does to, rather than with people. Member of the club also recognise a need for greater understanding about dementia in the local community and are committed to raising awareness and understanding of what it feels like to be living with dementia, and how other people can be helpful not hurtful. The Club runs a Community Care Training and Volunteer Academy offering up to 12 weeks of training and 12 hours voluntary work for people considering employment in the care sector. Over the years, the Me, Myself and I Club has developed links and partnerships with a range of national and local initiatives, including the Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project (DEEP).

Rethinking respite for people affected by dementia

OLDER PEOPLE'S COMMISSIONER FOR WALES
2018

This report provides evidence of how respite care for people affected by dementia can be positively transformed and aims to help policy makers, commissioners and providers to deliver change. It brings together the results of an engagement exercise with over 120 people affected by dementia, undertaken in partnership with My Home Life Cymru (Swansea University); a literature review by the University of Worcester Association for Dementia Studies; and a call for examples of practice. The report identifies key challenges facing people who need to accessing respite when they need it, covering the following themes: navigating the health and care system; availability; quality, flexibility and choice; information, advice and advocacy; meaningful occupation; home or away?; complex needs and keeping people active; safeguarding and positive risk taking; diversity; maintaining and building relationships; social inclusion and having an ‘ordinary’ life. Drawing on people’s experiences and examples from practice, it provides enablers to help overcome these barriers. The report shows that not all ‘routes to respite’ are clear to the public, there is uneven access across the country, many people feel that current options are not delivering the quality, flexibility or accessibility they need; and there were concerns that money is being spent on respite services that do not deliver meaningful outcomes. It concludes that there is a need to rethink the language and terminology around respite; make better use of the knowledge and experiences of people living with dementia and carers to develop new models of care and support; and to align the outcomes with the National Outcomes Framework. Whilst the report focuses specifically on people affected by dementia, many of the key messages will be relevant to other people who need respite.

Preventative support for adult carers in Wales: rapid review

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This rapid review, commissioned by Social Care Wales, draws on research published since 2012 to identify emerging and promising practice in adult carers support. It focuses on support that takes a preventative approach by providing information and support to reduce or prevent the likelihood of carer crisis and breakdown, and improve the overall quality of carers’ lives. The review identifies key characteristics of effective preventative support services. It presents the review findings across the following key themes: identification and recognition of carers; the provision of information, advice and assistance; and supporting carers for a life outside of their caring role, through services such as respite and short breaks, emotional and employment support. Examples of services and interventions from Wales and England are included throughout. The final section looks at the available evidence on evaluating what works for carers.

An independent review of Shared Lives for older people and people living with dementia

PPL, CORDIS BRIGHT, SOCIAL FINANCE
2018

Shared Lives is based around a Shared Lives carer sharing their home with an adult in need of care, to encourage meaningful relationships, independent living skills and community integration. This review explores how Shared Lives’ respite service for older people and people with dementia compare to ‘traditional’ forms of care for across three areas: outcomes for service users, carer and care commissioners; direct care costs to commissioners; and impact on the broader health system, such as a reduced usage. The review found that Shared Lives model provides positive outcomes for both service users and carers. It found that Shared Lives arrangements were able to reduce social isolation experience by carers and help increase their general wellbeing. Shared Lives also resulted in increased independence, wellbeing and choice for service users. In addition, the study found that the costs Shared Lives approach are similar to ‘traditional’ respite provision and provide an important option for commissioners. Appendices include details of calculations of the cost of providing Shared Lives respite care and day services; the results of a rapid evidence assessment on outcomes of 'traditional' respite care; and details of Healthcare service usage modelling.

Older people receiving family-based support in the community: a survey of quality of life among users of 'Shared Lives' in England

CALLAGHAN Lisa, BROOKES Nadia, PALMER Sinead
2017

Shared Lives (adult placement) is a model of community-based support where an adult who needs support and/or accommodation moves into or regularly visits the home of an approved Shared Lives carer, after they have been matched for compatibility. It is an established but small service which has been used mainly by people with learning disabilities but which has the potential to offer an alternative to traditional services for some older people. However, there is little research on the outcomes for older users of Shared Lives. This paper presents findings from a survey of 150 older people using Shared Lives support across 10 Shared Lives schemes in England, which took place between June 2013 and January 2014. The aim was to identify outcomes for older users of Shared Lives and compare these to outcomes for older users of other social care services. In the absence of an ideal study design involving randomised allocation, statistical matching was used to generate a comparison group from the Adult Social Care Survey from 2011/12, with 121 cases matched to 121 Shared Lives cases. The main outcome measures were Social Care-Related Quality of Life (measured by the ASCOT) and overall quality of life. Findings indicated that Shared Lives can deliver good outcomes for older people, particularly for overall quality of life. In comparison to the matched group of older people using other forms of support, there was some evidence that Shared Lives may deliver better outcomes in some aspects of quality of life. Limitations to the research mean, however, that more work is needed to fully understand the role Shared Lives could play in supporting older people.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2017

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2017

This report draws a survey of Shared Lives schemes in England to provide an analysis of services across England for the period 2015/16. The report provides figures on the numbers of people who use Shared Lives services, the type of arrangements they live in (live-in, short break and day support), the regional breakdown of services, the number and characteristics of carers, and staffing levels. The report finds that the Shared Lives sector has grown by 5 per cent over the past year, with approximately 11880 people being supported in Shared Lives arrangements. People with learning disabilities remained the primary users of the service, making up 71 percent of all users. This is despite a small reduction in the number of people with learning disabilities accessing the service in the previous year. The next largest group getting help from Shared Lives were people with mental health problems, who made up 8 per cent of users. Short case studies are included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes. It ends with key learning from the past year and identifies some of the key factors and barriers to the successful expansion of Shared Lives.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2016

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2016

This report draws on a survey of Shared Lives Plus members across the country to provide an analysis of services across England, covering the period 2014/15. The report includes figures on numbers of people using Shared Lives services, the number of carers, staff turnover and motivation, types of arrangement (live in, short breaks and day support) and numbers of users by region. The results show that the number of people using Shared Lives support is continuing to rise. In 2014/15 11,570 people were getting help from Shared Lives compared to 10,440 in 2013/14. People with learning disabilities remain the primary users of Shared Lives support, accounting for 76% of all users. The next largest group getting help via Shared Lives were people with mental health problems who made up 7% of users. The survey also reports a rise in both the number of older people and people with dementia using Shared Lives. There has also been an increase of over 50% in use of Shared Lives as day support. Projected cost savings are provided to show the total savings that could be made if Shared Lives reached its full potential. Short case studies are also included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes.

Revitalise Respite Holidays

Revitalise

Revitalise provides respite holidays with on-call nursing care for people with disabilities in the UK. Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2014 its work is underpinned by the belief that everybody needs a break. It aims to improve the quality of life for those living with a disability and also their carers. By providing a guilt- and stress-free break, Revitalise breaks aim to ease the physical and emotional toll caring can take on carers.

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LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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