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Results for 'social activities'

Results 1 - 10 of 27

Promising approaches revisited: effective action on loneliness in later life

JOPLING Kate
2020

Drawing on the expertise and experience of leading figures in the field, academic literature and other evidence, this report presents an update to an earlier framework for loneliness interventions published in 2015. The framework helps to make sense of the different ways we can address loneliness, and explains how these approaches fit together to create an effective community response. The guide offers examples of these approaches in action so that organisations can find inspiration from others. The new guide learns the lessons of the last five years – as well as the impact of the pandemic and how organisations tackling loneliness have adapted. Its key message is that to tackle loneliness, different types of support need to be in place. People need to have the infrastructure to engage in social life, whether that is about digital, transport or a built environment that supports social life. Finally, there are direct ways of reducing loneliness whether that is one-to-one or in groups, or psychological support. A key change to the framework is the addition of the built environment as part of the ‘gateway infrastructure’ that helps tackle loneliness, recognising the role shops, cafes and pubs play as places to meet.

Promising approaches revisited: supplementary case studies

JOPLING Kate
2020

This supplement is a companion piece to the report Promising Approaches Revisited: Effective action on loneliness in later life. That report sets out the different elements needed for effective action to reduce loneliness. These case studies show the framework in action, illustrating how each element may work in practice. They cover: connectors services, including social prescribing; direct solution including group-based interventions and one-to-one approaches; gateway infrastructure such as digital technology and the built environment; and neighbourhood approaches.

The After Party evaluation report on a socially distanced care home project: March – July 2020

MAGIC ME
2020

This evaluation summarises outcomes for those involved in The After Party project, including care home residents and staff, volunteers, artists and staff from the care providers; and provides a short overview of Magic Me’s Cocktail in Care Homes (CICH) project, with a focus on the context of how The After Party began. The study also includes learning and suggestions for future work, in light of outcomes and learning from The After Party. For over 10 years Magic Me trained volunteers who were seeking connections with their local communities to come into their local care homes and have a party with residents. The After Party was developed as a way of keeping up the links with these key CICH sites during the pandemic, in place of the planned last few parties to mark the end of the CICH programme. Each month, After Party care partners received newsletters from Magic Me, which included artist actions and activities, alongside personalised messages from CICH Volunteers. After Party ‘care packages’ were sent via post by the artists, which included creative activities and resources, physical items, i.e. letters, artworks and/ or physical representations of artworks produced by volunteers and the wider public who have taken part in the creative activities throughout the month. They are physical mementos for residents, staff and the home/scheme. The evaluation found that Magic Me provided very easy to use care packages which met the needs of residents, were helpful to care staff, motivated volunteers and generated a great deal of happiness and interaction at a very difficult time. Benefits were felt by all involved. Although it was impossible to create the same sense of connection as when meeting face to face, it seems that The After Party managed to capture some of the energy and colour of the CICH parties and this was transferred into the online project.

Nine ways to connect your care home with the community: a guide for care homes

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FORUM FOR INCLUSION, TIMEBANKING UK
2020

This guide draws out some of the lessons from the final evaluation of Time to Connect, a project to help people living in care settings to play a greater part in the life of their community. It makes nine suggestions of ways for a care home to connect with its community, all based on based real-life examples. They include bringing in visiting services, such as leisure or health services; supporting residents to host their own guests and groups; strengthening existing contacts and creating new links in the community; and connecting and organising activities with other care homes.

Evidence scope: loneliness and social work

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health and Social Care
2020

This evidence scope looks at the role of social workers in preventing and reducing loneliness and isolation. It draws on a literature review and a survey of social work practitioners which was commissioned by the Chief Social Worker for Adults and carried out by Research in Practice for Adults. The scope provides key messages from research and practice in identifying people who are experiencing, or at risk of, chronic loneliness. It also presents evidence of effective interventions to prevent and reduce loneliness in the following areas: social activities, technology, partnership working with other agencies, human relationships, and being person centred and understanding every individual’s different experience of loneliness. Key messages for social workers and employers to inform the development of resources to improve practice are included.

The intergenerational evaluation toolkit

JARROTT Shannon
2019

Intergenerational shared sites and intergenerational programmes that bring younger and older generations together can have many positive benefits. This Toolkit provides three resources to support programme providers and researchers to demonstrate the impact of intergenerational programming and the practices which achieve outcomes. The toolkit includes an Intergenerational Practice Evaluation tool to evaluate single intergenerational activities and the impact of programmes over time; a guide to planning an intergenerational evaluation; and a list of reliable outcome measures. The toolkit has been developed following 15 years of collaborative innovative practice and evaluation research.

Ageing Better in Camden: interim evaluation report

REMBISZEWSKI Perla, BIDEY Tim, VANSON Tim
2018

The first of two interim evaluation reports to explore the outcomes projects commissioned by Ageing Better in Camden (ABC), a six-year programme to address social isolation and loneliness in older people living in Camden. This report focuses on the progress of 8 projects, which include a Digital Inclusion project; North London Cares Intergenerational and Men’s Action projects; Community Action Projects, and LGBT+ Connect providing opportunities for older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Camden to socialise. Each project focused chapter includes details of participants, evidence of impact and individual case studies. The evaluation draws on qualitative data from conversations with project participants and project leads, as well as quantitative data from demographic surveys. Early findings suggest that the projects are achieving the anticipated positive impacts for older people. Positive impacts include: improved mental and physical well-being; new friendships and connections; improved confidence and independence; relationship building across communities and generations. The evaluation found that frontline staff played a key role in enabling participants to achieve positive impacts.

Connecting communities: housing at the heart of integrated health and social care in Scotland

HANOVER SCOTLAND
2019

A summary of findings from the Connecting Communities project, an action research project in a mix of amenity, sheltered and very sheltered Hanover housing developments in Scotland. The research aimed to understand what matters most to people living, visiting and working in Hanover housing. It also aimed to test out ways to build connectedness and increase wellbeing. The report describes the methodology used and sets out the lessons for the housing, health and care sectors. It also demonstrates how the organisation is using 'Five ways to Well-being' to improve the wellbeing of their residents. The five ways are: Connecting, Being active; Taking notice; Keep learning; and Giving to create a sense of purpose and belonging. Personal stories are used to illustrate the benefits of the approach. The findings show that home is fundamental to the well-being of people and the sustainability of communities. It makes recommendations for better engagement with older people when services are being developed and for a better understanding of the networks and supports which already exist in communities. The report highlights that housing associations should be fully included in the ongoing integration of health and care.

North London Cares and South London Cares evaluation: final report

HITCHIN John, PETIE Olivia, NORRLANDER Amanda
2019

An evaluation Love Your Neighbour and Social Clubs, two programmes to reduce loneliness, improve intergenerational relationships and create a greater sense of community. The programmes, which aimed to bring together people of different generations to spend time together, were delivered across the London based charities North London Cares and South London Cares as part of The Cares Family’s model. The Social clubs programme brings together groups of younger and older neighbours to get involved in activities and socialise; and Love Your Neighbour focuses on one-to-one friendships between older and younger neighbours. The evaluation examines the outcomes for young and older neighbours, the strengths and weaknesses of the model, and highlights the challenges of evaluating community-based models. The evaluation found that overall, The Cares Family model is contributing to positive outcomes in four areas: reduced loneliness and isolation, particularly for older neighbours; improved understanding across the generations; a sense of belonging; and an increased connection to self.

Going the extra step: a compendium of best practice in dementia care. Preventing unwanted isolation and loneliness for people with dementia living in housing with care

TWYFORD Katey, WELLS Wendy
2019

A collection of examples of extra care schemes and other housing related community services that support people with dementia to develop meaningful relationships, helping to reduce social isolation and loneliness. They include examples of personalised support that can be arranged for residents; examples of groups and social activities; and different organisational and community-based approaches that have been adopted. The examples range from informal arrangements supported by staff or other residents to formal service provision.

Results 1 - 10 of 27

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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