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Results for 'social activities'

Results 1 - 10 of 30

Older men at the margins: experiences of seeking social engagement and combating loneliness in later life: research findings

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2020

Summarises findings of a study aimed to develop an in-depth understanding of how older men from marginalised and seldom heard groups sought to maintain social engagement and social participation in later life. This included their experiences of participation in group interventions targeted at reducing loneliness among older adults. A total of 111 men self-selected to take part in the study from five groups: (1) men who are single or living alone in urban areas; (2) men who are single or living alone in rural areas (i.e. towns, villages, hamlets with less than 10,000 residents); (3) gay-identifying men who are single or living alone; (4) men with hearing loss; and (5) men who are carers for significant others. Participants ranged in ages from 65–95 years and the mean age was 76. Key findings include: the effects of loneliness were often pronounced and had a range of negative impacts on day-to-day life; experiences differed by sexuality, hearing loss and caring responsibility; feeling 'left out of things', socially excluded, overlooked, cut-off were commonly expressed emotions; men did not always have people to confide their feelings to – or felt reticent about doing so; men valued groups that tried to increase social opportunities and interaction; mixed aged groups were strongly preferred, as they did not want to be siloed in groups for ‘old people’; there were notable barriers and challenges in accessing and participating in groups; social care practitioners need to be aware of the life events associated with loneliness and how these trigger points impact on wellbeing and social engagement with others.

Virtual quizzes involving several care homes are feasible and might reduce loneliness and social isolation

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2021

Summarises findings of a study that trialled connecting care homes virtually via quiz sessions. Simple low-cost video technology allowed residents in different care homes to enjoy taking part in virtual quizzes. Twenty-two care home residents, from three homes, volunteered to take part. Residents with dementia, signs of cognitive decline, and hearing or visual impairments were included. Some residents were non-verbal, or had limited mobility, and some had no prior experience of video calls. Afterwards, staff and residents provided feedback on the benefits and feasibility of the sessions. Four themes emerged from interviews with staff and residents: residents with moderate-advanced dementia remembered faces and conversations but could not recall having seen the technology before – they expressed happiness when remembering conversations with people ‘outside’ of their care home, and answering questions in a ‘game’; residents felt more connected with others – within the same care home, residents learnt more about each other’s backgrounds and interests and across care homes they enjoyed comparing features of their environments; residents re-gained a sense of self by sharing their stories and remembering their pasts with people of a similar age; the virtual quizzes provided relief from loneliness or boredom. Most residents said the video calls helped them to ‘pass the time’ and gave them ‘something to do’. Residents said the quizzes encouraged them to get to know others within the same home more than passive activities, such as watching TV. Across care homes, residents were surprised that there were so many people with similar interests or professions, or who had grown up in the same area as they had.

Ever more needed? The role of the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks during the COVID-19 pandemic

DAYSON Chris, et al
2020

This report draws on the findings of a ‘real time evaluation’ (RTE) of the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks (LNNs) during the pandemic, as a way to understand and share learning about their response. The LNNs aim to support older people to live independently and participate in their communities as they grow older, through a range of activities and services that are provided at a neighbourhood level. The networks have developed over the past 30 years and there are now 37 of them covering the whole city of Leeds. The form, function, activities and services of the networks are diverse, but they share some key characteristics, such as running with the involvement of older people. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic there was a city-wide ambition for a symbiotic relationship between the LNNs and the health and care sector. This was linked the city’s strategic vision to make Leeds the ‘best city in the UK to grow old in’ and recognition of the need for a ‘left shift’ of resources toward prevention and the development community-based resources and assets. Although the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic meant that this progressive policy agenda was placed on hold out of necessity as city partners focussed on addressing the acute needs brought about by the crisis, the pandemic also provided an opportunity for the LNNs to demonstrate their value by being part of this response at a city and neighbourhood level.

Promising approaches revisited: effective action on loneliness in later life

JOPLING Kate
2020

Drawing on the expertise and experience of leading figures in the field, academic literature and other evidence, this report presents an update to an earlier framework for loneliness interventions published in 2015. The framework helps to make sense of the different ways we can address loneliness, and explains how these approaches fit together to create an effective community response. The guide offers examples of these approaches in action so that organisations can find inspiration from others. The new guide learns the lessons of the last five years – as well as the impact of the pandemic and how organisations tackling loneliness have adapted. Its key message is that to tackle loneliness, different types of support need to be in place. People need to have the infrastructure to engage in social life, whether that is about digital, transport or a built environment that supports social life. Finally, there are direct ways of reducing loneliness whether that is one-to-one or in groups, or psychological support. A key change to the framework is the addition of the built environment as part of the ‘gateway infrastructure’ that helps tackle loneliness, recognising the role shops, cafes and pubs play as places to meet.

Promising approaches revisited: supplementary case studies

JOPLING Kate
2020

This supplement is a companion piece to the report Promising Approaches Revisited: Effective action on loneliness in later life. That report sets out the different elements needed for effective action to reduce loneliness. These case studies show the framework in action, illustrating how each element may work in practice. They cover: connectors services, including social prescribing; direct solution including group-based interventions and one-to-one approaches; gateway infrastructure such as digital technology and the built environment; and neighbourhood approaches.

The After Party evaluation report on a socially distanced care home project: March – July 2020

MAGIC ME
2020

This evaluation summarises outcomes for those involved in The After Party project, including care home residents and staff, volunteers, artists and staff from the care providers; and provides a short overview of Magic Me’s Cocktail in Care Homes (CICH) project, with a focus on the context of how The After Party began. The study also includes learning and suggestions for future work, in light of outcomes and learning from The After Party. For over 10 years Magic Me trained volunteers who were seeking connections with their local communities to come into their local care homes and have a party with residents. The After Party was developed as a way of keeping up the links with these key CICH sites during the pandemic, in place of the planned last few parties to mark the end of the CICH programme. Each month, After Party care partners received newsletters from Magic Me, which included artist actions and activities, alongside personalised messages from CICH Volunteers. After Party ‘care packages’ were sent via post by the artists, which included creative activities and resources, physical items, i.e. letters, artworks and/ or physical representations of artworks produced by volunteers and the wider public who have taken part in the creative activities throughout the month. They are physical mementos for residents, staff and the home/scheme. The evaluation found that Magic Me provided very easy to use care packages which met the needs of residents, were helpful to care staff, motivated volunteers and generated a great deal of happiness and interaction at a very difficult time. Benefits were felt by all involved. Although it was impossible to create the same sense of connection as when meeting face to face, it seems that The After Party managed to capture some of the energy and colour of the CICH parties and this was transferred into the online project.

Nine ways to connect your care home with the community: a guide for care homes

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FORUM FOR INCLUSION, TIMEBANKING UK
2020

This guide draws out some of the lessons from the final evaluation of Time to Connect, a project to help people living in care settings to play a greater part in the life of their community. It makes nine suggestions of ways for a care home to connect with its community, all based on based real-life examples. They include bringing in visiting services, such as leisure or health services; supporting residents to host their own guests and groups; strengthening existing contacts and creating new links in the community; and connecting and organising activities with other care homes.

Evidence scope: loneliness and social work

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health and Social Care
2020

This evidence scope looks at the role of social workers in preventing and reducing loneliness and isolation. It draws on a literature review and a survey of social work practitioners which was commissioned by the Chief Social Worker for Adults and carried out by Research in Practice for Adults. The scope provides key messages from research and practice in identifying people who are experiencing, or at risk of, chronic loneliness. It also presents evidence of effective interventions to prevent and reduce loneliness in the following areas: social activities, technology, partnership working with other agencies, human relationships, and being person centred and understanding every individual’s different experience of loneliness. Key messages for social workers and employers to inform the development of resources to improve practice are included.

The intergenerational evaluation toolkit

JARROTT Shannon
2019

Intergenerational shared sites and intergenerational programmes that bring younger and older generations together can have many positive benefits. This Toolkit provides three resources to support programme providers and researchers to demonstrate the impact of intergenerational programming and the practices which achieve outcomes. The toolkit includes an Intergenerational Practice Evaluation tool to evaluate single intergenerational activities and the impact of programmes over time; a guide to planning an intergenerational evaluation; and a list of reliable outcome measures. The toolkit has been developed following 15 years of collaborative innovative practice and evaluation research.

Ageing Better in Camden: interim evaluation report

REMBISZEWSKI Perla, BIDEY Tim, VANSON Tim
2018

The first of two interim evaluation reports to explore the outcomes projects commissioned by Ageing Better in Camden (ABC), a six-year programme to address social isolation and loneliness in older people living in Camden. This report focuses on the progress of 8 projects, which include a Digital Inclusion project; North London Cares Intergenerational and Men’s Action projects; Community Action Projects, and LGBT+ Connect providing opportunities for older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Camden to socialise. Each project focused chapter includes details of participants, evidence of impact and individual case studies. The evaluation draws on qualitative data from conversations with project participants and project leads, as well as quantitative data from demographic surveys. Early findings suggest that the projects are achieving the anticipated positive impacts for older people. Positive impacts include: improved mental and physical well-being; new friendships and connections; improved confidence and independence; relationship building across communities and generations. The evaluation found that frontline staff played a key role in enabling participants to achieve positive impacts.

Results 1 - 10 of 30

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News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
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