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Results for 'social capital'

Results 1 - 10 of 10

Resilience: understanding the interdependence between individuals and communities

DAVIES Alisha R., et al
2019

Drawing on the results of a literature review, this report brings together evidence on individual and community resilience, and the interdependence between the two. It draws on examples of programmes to strengthen resilience across the life course and in communities, and looks at approaches to measuring change in resilience. The report highlights how people’s sense of wellbeing, how well they cope emotionally, and how they engage socially are the key factors for resilience, which in turn contribute to wider community resilience. Resilient communities can draw on the assets within people, place and wider economic factors. It also finds that resilience is not fixed but changes at different points in peoples' lives. The report highlights a range of activities that improve community and individual resilience, including: encouraging good relationships and connections with others; establishing a healthy family environment and early positive parent-child relationships; promoting good health and mental wellbeing in adulthood, including developing positive relationships and social capital through engaging with the community; and enhancing the resilience of older people though building positive relationships, strengthening social connections and meaningful engagement, alongside enhancing autonomy and independence. It concludes with a summary of the key messages.

Social infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work. Briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing highlights the importance of shared spaces to help reduce social isolation amongst older people as the population ages and austerity leads to more and more state responsibilities falling to civil society. Shared spaces could be public libraries, commercial spaces such as cafes or leisure facilities and parks and green spaces. The briefing explains how different kinds of shared spaces help support different types and levels of social capital. This can be between people who share a common bond as well as connections between diverse groups of people. The ability to build even weak social ties with a diversity of people can help provide bridges to new social worlds, helping older people feel more connected to the places in which they live and improving resilience. The briefing summarises findings from the report, 'Social Infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work' produced by MICRA as part of the Ambition for Ageing programme.

Social infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work

YARKER Sophie
2019

This report, from the Ambition for Ageing project, identifies how social infrastructure in neighbourhoods can promote social interaction and reduce social isolation for older people. Social infrastructure provides spaces and opportunities for people to have social interactions and build connections. The report argues there needs to be a diversity of social infrastructure to support different types and levels of social connection, and considers the importance of the connections made between diverse groups of people - also known as bridging capital. It also looks at the types of social infrastructure that facilitate this, which tend to be places that the majority of the community would have the opportunity to visit, such as public libraries, cafes and parks and open public spaces. Key points include: that shared spaces within neighbourhoods are vital for reducing social isolation for older people; that different kinds of social infrastructure help support different types and levels of social capital; and the need for social infrastructure that supports intergenerational and intercultural encounters. Despite its often informal nature, social infrastructure is not naturally occurring and therefore The report highlights the need for direct investment and support to help the development of the social infrastructure and the creation of third places.

Community development in health: a literature review


2016

This literature review offers a brief background to the current state of play in the NHS and statutory services, and ideas that services more flexible, place-based services are likely to offer more effective and efficient outcomes. It then provides an overview of the nature of community development, its relationship to community health and to enhancing the responsiveness of commissioning of services. It brings together evidence which shows how communities can be supported to develop their own strengths and their own trajectories of development. It also examines the health benefits of community engagement, and identifies the limitations of some studies and where evidence that suggests poor outcomes or risks. It looks developing a business case, and what is already known of costs and benefits of community development. It finds that although it is difficult to express costs and benefits of community development in monetary terms, some effective techniques do exist. The evidence shows that community development helps to strengthen and increase social networks and therefore build up social capital. Evidence shows that they to contribute significantly to individual and to community health and resilience. Existing data also suggests that community development in health is cost-effective and provides good value for money. The review includes definitions of community development and key related concepts, including as asset-based approaches, co-production, social networks, social capital, and community capital.

Social isolation in mental health: a conceptual and methodological review: scoping review 14

WANG Jingyi, et al
2016

Social isolation and related terms such as loneliness have been increasingly discussed in the field of mental health. However, there is a lack of conceptual clarity and consistency of measurement of these terms and understanding of overlaps. This report provides definitions and brief explanations of relevant conceptual terms from the literature, and proposed a conceptual model covering different aspects of social isolation. Aspects of social isolation covered include loneliness, social support, social network, social capital, confiding relationships, and alienation. The conceptual model contains five domains to include all elements of current conceptualisations. These five domains are: social network: quantity; social network: structure; social network: quality; appraisal of relationships: emotional; appraisal of relationships: resources. It then proposes well established measures in the field of mental health for each conceptual domains of social isolation. The authors discuss the strengths and limitations of the approach. The developed model can help researchers and intervention developers to identify expected outcomes of interventions precisely and choose the most appropriate measures for use in mental health settings.

Kinder communities: the power of everyday relationships

FERGUSON Zoe
2016

This discussion paper explores the evidence on the impact of everyday relationships and kindness on individual and societal wellbeing, and community empowerment, and develops a theory of change. The paper sets out what maintaining connections and acting in kindness means and how these relate to concepts such as social capital, ‘random acts of kindness’, resilience, isolation and loneliness. Drawing on the evidence, it explains why kinder communities are important, what are the enablers and barriers, and what is happening currently to strengthen everyday relationships and kinder communities, focusing on community development, interface with public services, building connections, assets based approaches and individual psychology. The paper includes seven case studies providing examples of good practice.

The liveable lives study: understanding everyday help and support: report

ANDERSON Simon, BROWNLIE Julie, MILNE Elisabeth-Jane
2015

This study highlights an overlooked component of social cohesion – everyday acts of informal help and support within communities. While such acts are often mundane and practical - small loans, lifts, help with shopping - they can also have a significant emotional dimension. Although these acts are often simple, navigating them is not: the researchers find that opposing moral forces complicate this picture. Concepts of the ‘deserving’, of stoicism and the imperative to help others all feature in this study. Key points include: the character of informal support among family, friends and even strangers is shaped by the social and physical characteristics of areas but also by the narratives that attach to them; in the often unspoken moral framework underpinning these interactions, both reciprocity (giving back) and mutuality (where both parties benefit from the interaction) are important elements; public policy needs to recognise both the interactional complexity and the emotional significance of everyday help and support. In the context of political debate around austerity and the scope of the state, the infrastructural qualities of such relationships need to be recognised. While such support makes possible other aspects of social life, it also requires maintenance and repair in its own right.

Understanding everyday help and support: summary

ANDERSON Simon, BROWNLIE Julie, MILNE Elisabeth-Jane
2015

A summary of a study examining low-level or everyday help and support and the role it can play in allowing people to lead ‘liveable’ lives. The study explored the ways in which the need for (and availability of) such support is shaped by social context, biography and relationships. It also looked at how support actually happens (or not) and how it is sustained over time. Key findings included: small acts of help, support and kindness were often mundane and barely noticed (even by those involved), but had fundamental consequences for individual and community well-being; although this everyday help was often practical, it could have important emotional consequences; individual circumstances, life stage and life events (e.g. parenting, ill health, retirement) created needs for informal help and support, but also ways of potentially meeting those needs; powerful emotions and moral considerations attached to these apparently straightforward acts, particularly notions of reciprocity and who should be considered deserving of help; many of the perceived risks of helping or being helped related to people’s concerns about their self-image or how others saw them; collectively, these acts and relationships of everyday help and support had an ‘infrastructural’ quality - they made possible other aspects of social life, but needed attention, maintenance and repair in their own right. The briefing concludes that while it is not possible to legislate for kindness, attempts should be made to avoid damaging – and, where possible, foster and extend – the conditions in which it occurs.

Timebanking

Timebanking UK

Timebanking is a means of exchange between people involving time where 1 hour of help = 1 time credit. Timebanking UK supports the development of community time banks where local people are regarded as assets and time banks helps to build mutual social and practical support networks. Timebanking UK is a membership organisation and there are currently 300 time banks across the country involving 30,000 people and 3,700 organisations.

Measuring national well-being: an analysis of social capital in the UK

SIEGLER Veronique
2015

This article provides a baseline analysis of social capital in the UK, using the latest available data. The data are based on 25 headline measures proposed by the Office for National Statistics, which cover four key aspects of social capital: personal relationships, social network support, civic engagement and trust and cooperative norms. Key findings include: around 1 in 10 people in the UK reported feeling lonely all, most, or more than half of the time in 2011/12 and just over a third said that they wish they could spend more time with their family and have more social contact. Nearly 1 in 5 people reported looking after or giving special help to someone sick, disabled or elderly and nearly a fifth of people had given unpaid help or worked as a volunteer in a local, national or international organisation or charity in the last 12 months in 2012/13. Half of people reported being very or quite interested in politics and around two-thirds thought people in their neighbourhood could be trusted. Nearly three-quarters of people felt people in their neighbourhood get along with each other and are willing to help each other.

Results 1 - 10 of 10

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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