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Results for 'social care'

Results 1 - 10 of 40

Cost-effectiveness of telecare for people with social care needs: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial

HENDERSON Catherine, et al
2014

Purpose of the study: to examine the costs and cost-effectiveness of ‘second-generation’ telecare, in addition to standard support and care that could include ‘first-generation’ forms of telecare, compared with standard support and care that could include ‘first-generation’ forms of telecare. Design and methods: a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial with nested economic evaluation. A total of 2,600 people with social care needs participated in a trial of community-based telecare in three English local authority areas. In the Whole Systems Demonstrator Telecare Questionnaire Study, 550 participants were randomised to intervention and 639 to control. Participants who were offered the telecare intervention received a package of equipment and monitoring services for 12 months, additional to their standard health and social care services. The control group received usual health and social care. Primary outcome measure: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. The analyses took a health and social care perspective. Results: cost per additional QALY was £297,000. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves indicated that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness-to-pay of £30,000 per QALY gained was only 16%. Sensitivity analyses combining variations in equipment price and support cost parameters yielded a cost-effectiveness ratio of £161,000 per QALY. Implications: while QALY gain in the intervention group was similar to that for controls, social and health services costs were higher. Second-generation telecare did not appear to be a cost-effective addition to usual care, assuming a commonly accepted willingness to pay for QALYs.

Evaluating social care prevention in England: challenges and opportunities

MARCZAK Joanna, WISTOW Gerald, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis
2019

Context: The Care Act 2014 placed a statutory duty on adult social care (ASC) to prevent and delay the development of needs for care and support. There is little clarity about how to translate this national obligation into effective local practice. Objectives: This exploratory study sought to lay the foundations for understanding approaches to this new duty by identifying: emerging local understandings of prevention; associated implementation strate­gies; and the potential for designing evaluation frameworks. Methods: Local perspectives were secured through: in-depth interviews in six English local authorities; reviews of local strategy, implementation documents and reviews of data sources; and methods for evaluating local initiatives in sampled authorities. Findings: The findings indicate important differences between and within local authorities in conceptuali­sations of prevention. Although willingness to commission services was strongly linked to the availability of evidence on what works in prevention, council conducted limited local evaluations. This study also found limited collaboration between ASC and Health in developing joint prevention approaches, in part due to differ­ences in conceptualisation and also constraints arising from different priorities and information systems. Limitations: The exploratory nature of the study and the small sample size limits the generalisability of its findings. Overall, the number of local authorities and respondents allowed us to explore a range of local views, opinions and practices related to the prevention agenda in a variety of contexts, however the findings are not generalisable to all English local authorities. Implications: This study suggests that the limited local evidence about prevention, combined with finan­cial austerity, may lead to disproportionate investment in a small number of interventions where existing evidence suggests cost-savings potential, which, in turn, may impact authorities’ ability to fulfil their statutory duties related to preventing and delaying the needs for care and support. In this connection, this study highlights the potential for developing local evaluation strategies utilising existing but largely unexploited local administrative data collections.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: final report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

This report summarises the evidence on nine identified interventions to support older people. It is the final report of a project to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. The focus is on the use of social care services, but the report also reviews interventions which also reduced the need for health services. The ROI includes nine interventions, identified though a literature review. They are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, which use social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. An accompanying technical report provides further detail of the literature review, selection of the interventions for inclusion in the tool and the modelling methods. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and presents results showing the economic benefits of each intervention.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: technical report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

The technical report of a project which aimed to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. This report provides detail of the literature review process, the process of assessment and prioritisation of interventions for inclusion in the tool, and the detailed modelling methods used. Based on evidence from the literature review and through discussion with expert Steering Group members, nine interventions are included in the ROI tool. These are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, using social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching delivered by inter-professional health and social care services; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and shows the economic benefits of each intervention.

Prevention: wrestling with new economic realities

KNAPP Martin
2013

Purpose : The purpose of this paper is to discuss the economic pressures on long-term care systems, and describe how an economic case might be made for better care, support and preventive strategies. Design/methodology/approach: Discussion of recent developments and research responses, with illustrations from previous studies. Findings: Economics evidence is highly relevant to decision makers in health, social care, and related systems. When resources are especially tight, economics evidence can sometimes persuade uncertain commissioners and others to adopt courses of action that improve the wellbeing of individuals, families, and communities. Originality/value: The paper uses long-established approaches in economic evaluation to discuss preventive and other strategies in today's challenging context.

The swing to early intervention and prevention and its implications for social work

GRAY Mel
2014

Social investment does not yet appear to have entered the social work lexicon yet reflects a shift toward early intervention and prevention and policies relating to early childhood education and care across the world. Recently, the prime minister of Australia announced new measures relating to childcare to ease the burden on working families and ensure high-standard care for pre-school children. Also announced was a mental health check to be administered by general practitioners for children as young as three years old. This change in social policy follows closely on the heels of the backlash against ameliorative welfare and move toward the preventive end of the social care spectrum. This paper examines developments leading to the social investment approach. It begins by defining social investment and providing an overview of key theorists contributing to our understanding of what ‘social investment is investing in’ and ends with a discussion of its implications for social work.

WRVS: delivering the preventative social care agenda

BERRY Lynne
2010

This article starts by outlining the importance of increased prevention investment and produces a series of evidence that emphasises how preventative approaches improve the quality of life of older people, whilst providing value for money. It describes prevention in this context as: giving older people respect for who they are; giving older people the feeling they are in control; having people older people trust around them; and giving older people the help they want, when they need it. After providing simple statistics outlining the success, this article moves on to illustrate, through personal stories, how the work of the Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) sits at the heart of delivering the preventative social care agenda. The paper ends by putting out a question for debate: what will the entitlement to preventative support mean in practice in a reformed social care system?

Preventive social care: is it cost effective?

CURRY Natasha
2006

This paper attempts to pull together and review key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention. The findings, which reflect a paucity of quantified information about the effectiveness of preventive interventions, suggest that there is a strong financial case for reducing hospitalisation (particularly through falls) and for reducing the rate of institutionalisation by maintaining independence. Small-scale trials show that small interventions could prevent falls and reduce the rate of institutionalisation. However, establishing a direct causal relationship between such interventions and long-term financial savings has proved problematic although. There is a lack of consensus over the cost effectiveness of intermediate care although there is evidence that it is cost effective when targeting specific groups/illnesses/events such as stroke and falls. Evidence for secondary stroke prevention services is perhaps the strongest, and most widely quantified, body of research. There is some evidence that primary prevention strategies (such as smoking cessation and reduced salt intake) have potential to reduce the incidence of stroke. The paper makes a series of recommendations, calling for a greater focus on low-level interventions, particularly where there is qualitative evidence that they are valued by service users; implementation of promising interventions, even if not supported by robust evidence, accompanying by formal evaluation during roll-out; development of standard outcome measures of prevention; targeting resources to ensure greatest impact; and greater integration between health and social care services as a drive to shift services towards the preventive end of the spectrum.

Active ingredients: the Aesop planning and evaluation model for arts with a social purpose

AESOP, BOP Consulting
2018

This short paper outlines a logic model developed for the planning and evaluation of the Dance to Health project, with suggestions of how it can be used in practice. The project aimed to develop a better understanding of the ways in which arts interventions in health and social contexts actually work, and to improve the ways these are designed and their impacts measured. The Active Ingredients logic model, includes: Inputs - such as the specific arts practice, venues and health or social care setting; and Outputs - volume of arts sessions and number of beneficiaries. It also summarises a set of ‘Active Ingredients’ in participatory arts work, which are summarised under the headings of ‘Engaging and Imagining’. The model will be useful for those involved in the evaluation and planning of arts interventions, as well as policymakers interested in arts as interventions.

Innovative models of health, care and support for adults

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This briefing explains that innovative, often small-scale models of health, social care and support for adults could be scaled up to benefit as many people as possible. The challenge is to make scaling up successful. The briefing is based on research conducted during the spring of 2017 by Nesta, SCIE, Shared Lives Plus and PPL. It includes real life examples and case studies to show how stakeholders are involved in building and growing successful and sustainable innovations in health, care and support which provide new ways of delivering relationship-based care. It also identifies key challenges and facilitators to scaling up innovative models and makes recommendations to help make impactful innovative models become part of mainstream care. It includes case studies from North London Carers – a community network of young professionals and older neighbours which helps to reduce loneliness and increase wellbeing; Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care programme – which brings together voluntary organisations and health and care services to support for older people living with multiple long-term conditions who are at risk of recurring hospital admission; Shared lives - adults either live with or regularly visit their chosen carer; North Yorkshire Innovation Fund – which provides funding to support voluntary and community organisations providing innovative intervention or prevention measures; and Wigan’s place-based approach. To help innovative models to flourish and scale up, it identifies keys to success as: a shared ambition to embed person- and community-centred ways of working; co-production; a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening; investment and commissioning in approaches which result in high quality outcomes; and use of data to drive change a willingness to learn from experience.

Results 1 - 10 of 40

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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