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Results for 'social care'

Results 1 - 10 of 36

Prevention: wrestling with new economic realities

KNAPP Martin
2013

Purpose : The purpose of this paper is to discuss the economic pressures on long-term care systems, and describe how an economic case might be made for better care, support and preventive strategies. Design/methodology/approach: Discussion of recent developments and research responses, with illustrations from previous studies. Findings: Economics evidence is highly relevant to decision makers in health, social care, and related systems. When resources are especially tight, economics evidence can sometimes persuade uncertain commissioners and others to adopt courses of action that improve the wellbeing of individuals, families, and communities. Originality/value: The paper uses long-established approaches in economic evaluation to discuss preventive and other strategies in today's challenging context.

The swing to early intervention and prevention and its implications for social work

GRAY Mel
2014

Social investment does not yet appear to have entered the social work lexicon yet reflects a shift toward early intervention and prevention and policies relating to early childhood education and care across the world. Recently, the prime minister of Australia announced new measures relating to childcare to ease the burden on working families and ensure high-standard care for pre-school children. Also announced was a mental health check to be administered by general practitioners for children as young as three years old. This change in social policy follows closely on the heels of the backlash against ameliorative welfare and move toward the preventive end of the social care spectrum. This paper examines developments leading to the social investment approach. It begins by defining social investment and providing an overview of key theorists contributing to our understanding of what ‘social investment is investing in’ and ends with a discussion of its implications for social work.

WRVS: delivering the preventative social care agenda

BERRY Lynne
2010

This article starts by outlining the importance of increased prevention investment and produces a series of evidence that emphasises how preventative approaches improve the quality of life of older people, whilst providing value for money. It describes prevention in this context as: giving older people respect for who they are; giving older people the feeling they are in control; having people older people trust around them; and giving older people the help they want, when they need it. After providing simple statistics outlining the success, this article moves on to illustrate, through personal stories, how the work of the Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) sits at the heart of delivering the preventative social care agenda. The paper ends by putting out a question for debate: what will the entitlement to preventative support mean in practice in a reformed social care system?

Preventive social care: is it cost effective?

CURRY Natasha
2006

This paper attempts to pull together and review key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention. The findings, which reflect a paucity of quantified information about the effectiveness of preventive interventions, suggest that there is a strong financial case for reducing hospitalisation (particularly through falls) and for reducing the rate of institutionalisation by maintaining independence. Small-scale trials show that small interventions could prevent falls and reduce the rate of institutionalisation. However, establishing a direct causal relationship between such interventions and long-term financial savings has proved problematic although. There is a lack of consensus over the cost effectiveness of intermediate care although there is evidence that it is cost effective when targeting specific groups/illnesses/events such as stroke and falls. Evidence for secondary stroke prevention services is perhaps the strongest, and most widely quantified, body of research. There is some evidence that primary prevention strategies (such as smoking cessation and reduced salt intake) have potential to reduce the incidence of stroke. The paper makes a series of recommendations, calling for a greater focus on low-level interventions, particularly where there is qualitative evidence that they are valued by service users; implementation of promising interventions, even if not supported by robust evidence, accompanying by formal evaluation during roll-out; development of standard outcome measures of prevention; targeting resources to ensure greatest impact; and greater integration between health and social care services as a drive to shift services towards the preventive end of the spectrum.

Active ingredients: the Aesop planning and evaluation model for arts with a social purpose

AESOP, BOP Consulting
2018

This short paper outlines a logic model developed for the planning and evaluation of the Dance to Health project, with suggestions of how it can be used in practice. The project aimed to develop a better understanding of the ways in which arts interventions in health and social contexts actually work, and to improve the ways these are designed and their impacts measured. The Active Ingredients logic model, includes: Inputs - such as the specific arts practice, venues and health or social care setting; and Outputs - volume of arts sessions and number of beneficiaries. It also summarises a set of ‘Active Ingredients’ in participatory arts work, which are summarised under the headings of ‘Engaging and Imagining’. The model will be useful for those involved in the evaluation and planning of arts interventions, as well as policymakers interested in arts as interventions.

Innovative models of health, care and support for adults

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This briefing explains that innovative, often small-scale models of health, social care and support for adults could be scaled up to benefit as many people as possible. The challenge is to make scaling up successful. The briefing is based on research conducted during the spring of 2017 by Nesta, SCIE, Shared Lives Plus and PPL. It includes real life examples and case studies to show how stakeholders are involved in building and growing successful and sustainable innovations in health, care and support which provide new ways of delivering relationship-based care. It also identifies key challenges and facilitators to scaling up innovative models and makes recommendations to help make impactful innovative models become part of mainstream care. It includes case studies from North London Carers – a community network of young professionals and older neighbours which helps to reduce loneliness and increase wellbeing; Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care programme – which brings together voluntary organisations and health and care services to support for older people living with multiple long-term conditions who are at risk of recurring hospital admission; Shared lives - adults either live with or regularly visit their chosen carer; North Yorkshire Innovation Fund – which provides funding to support voluntary and community organisations providing innovative intervention or prevention measures; and Wigan’s place-based approach. To help innovative models to flourish and scale up, it identifies keys to success as: a shared ambition to embed person- and community-centred ways of working; co-production; a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening; investment and commissioning in approaches which result in high quality outcomes; and use of data to drive change a willingness to learn from experience.

Untapped potential: bringing the voluntary sector's strengths to health and care transformation

WESTON Andrew, et al
2016

This report highlights the potential of the voluntary and community sectors to help shape health and care reform, and identifies the added-value that the sector can bring. The research was commissioned by the Richmond Group of Charities and it assessed the findings of 175 evaluations into how the voluntary sector's offer can be integrated into the health and care system of the future. It also presents a framework for a shared language, to help charities describe their work and its value, and to give commissioners and policymakers a way to identify the aspects of charities’ work that most clearly match their needs. The majority of findings reviewed related to health and wellbeing outcomes. The review found strong evidence that charities achieve health and wellbeing outcomes through direct treatment and support and supported self-management and good evidence that charities deliver health and wellbeing and productivity and efficiency outcomes through system redesign. The report concludes that charities can add value to the health and care system in a range of ways and that charities have a legitimate role in the transformation of the NHS and the wider health and care system in the coming years. The report makes recommendations that could support the voluntary, community and statutory sectors to change their behaviour to support this changes happen at a faster pace.

Prevention in action: how prevention and integration are being understood and prioritised locally in England

FIELD Olivia
2017

This report provides a picture of local developments in preventative services in England and highlights examples of good practice. It aimed to explore the extent to which local authorities, sustainability and transformation partnerships, and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention, as well as to better understand how and to what extent local decision makers are integrating health and social care. The methodology included a review of joint health and wellbeing strategies and sustainability and transformation plans, and a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to local authorities. The report finds that while local authorities across England have made efforts to implement preventative services and identifies examples of innovation and good practice, the Care Act’s vision for prevention is not being fully realised and that local authorities in England need to provide more services that prevent, reduce or delay the need for care and support. The report also identified shortcomings in plans for integrating health and social care. Barriers to implementing preventive services include: a lack of clarity on what is meant by prevention and integration, resistance to cultural change, and reduced resources. The report makes recommendations to support a better and integrated, preventative care system.

The social value of sheltered housing: briefing paper

WOOD Claudia
2017

Drawing on the findings from a review of evidence on the impact of sheltered housing for older people, this briefing paper provides estimates of the cost savings sheltered housing can achieve for health and social care. The paper gives a conservative estimate of a social value saving made by sheltered housing of nearly half a billion pounds. This figure takes into account costs saved through a reduction in the number of falls by older people, the time spent in hospital, combating loneliness, as well as fewer unnecessary call-outs to emergency services. The paper was commissioned to help Anchor, Hanover and Housing & Care 21 consider the future of sheltered housing.

Health, care and housing workshop

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER, ANCHOR, HANOVER
2017

Summarises discussions from workshop with people across the health, care and housing sectors to develop joint solutions to enable people to live independently for longer and alleviate pressure on the NHS and social care. The workshops aimed to identify the blockages preventing integration between health, care and housing; solutions to transform the system; and the implications for housing supply, commissioning decisions and care pathways. The three fictional personas were used to explore the experiences of individuals through the current health, care and housing system, and to identify what this might look like in an ideal world. Seven main themes emerged from the discussions: learning from good practice, focussing on the individual and their outcomes, rather than systems and cost savings; leadership from Government in relation to older people and older people’s housing; differences between housing and health that can create barriers to joint working; a more active role for local government and local citizens; the need to monitor the impact of early intervention and prevention; and improvements in current and new housing stock. A list of key actions and links to examples of good practice are included.

Results 1 - 10 of 36

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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