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Results for 'social care provision'

Results 1 - 10 of 25

Preventative services for older people: current approaches and future opportunities

WISTOW Gerald, LEWIS Helen
1997

Paper written as a background to a seminar on preventative services to older people. Outlines the issues and goes on to look at: what preventative services are; what obstacles to well being are faced by older people; what services there should be; what is currently available; what blockages there are preventing such services being available more widely; what is known about the effectiveness of such services; and key messages for policy makers.

Commissioning for health and well-being: an introduction

GLASBY Jon
2012

Commissioning is now a key task for health and social care. While commissioning was important under New Labour, it seems set to be even more fundamental now as commissioners have to make decisions about future services in an era of austerity. This book explores what commissioning is, where it has come from, and where it might be going. It comprises a compilation of separate papers from a wide range of experts from fields including health care, social care, and local government. The book starts with an overview of policy and the history of commissioning. The next group of chapters takes the reader through key stages of the commissioning cycle, considering issues such as decision making and priority setting, procurement and market management, commissioning for service resilience, and commissioning for quality and outcomes. The final 4 chapters pick up on cross-cutting themes, such as the economics of commissioning, user involvement, joint commissioning and commissioning in an era of personalisation. The book is likely to be of interest to everyone involved in the planning and delivery of health and social care including social policy students, health and social care practitioners, managers and policy makers.

'The billion dollar question': embedding prevention in older people's services: 10 'high impact' changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2010

There is a need to invest more fully and strategically in both prevention and rehabilitation for older people, to help them stay healthier, more independent and more socially included for longer and to recover these capacities as fully as possible when they do require hospital treatment. While there is growing recognition that only a more preventative agenda will be sufficient to respond to current and future pressures, there is much less clarity about how to do this in practice. This paper seeks to identify the most promising ‘10 high impact changes’ with regards to prevention in older people’s services. The paper draws on two main sources. The first is an EU review of prevention and long-term care in older people’s services across 14 European counties known as Interlinks. The second key source is a recent review of the social and economic benefits of adult social care, commissioned by the Department of Health and Downing Street. This paper identifies and reviews the following 10 prevention strategies: promoting healthy lifestyles; vaccination; screening; falls prevention; housing adaptations and practical support; telecare and technology; intermediate care; reablement; partnership working; and personalisation.

WRVS: delivering the preventative social care agenda

BERRY Lynne
2010

This article starts by outlining the importance of increased prevention investment and produces a series of evidence that emphasises how preventative approaches improve the quality of life of older people, whilst providing value for money. It describes prevention in this context as: giving older people respect for who they are; giving older people the feeling they are in control; having people older people trust around them; and giving older people the help they want, when they need it. After providing simple statistics outlining the success, this article moves on to illustrate, through personal stories, how the work of the Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) sits at the heart of delivering the preventative social care agenda. The paper ends by putting out a question for debate: what will the entitlement to preventative support mean in practice in a reformed social care system?

Prevention in action: how prevention and integration are being understood and prioritised locally in England

FIELD Olivia
2017

This report provides a picture of local developments in preventative services in England and highlights examples of good practice. It aimed to explore the extent to which local authorities, sustainability and transformation partnerships, and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention, as well as to better understand how and to what extent local decision makers are integrating health and social care. The methodology included a review of joint health and wellbeing strategies and sustainability and transformation plans, and a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to local authorities. The report finds that while local authorities across England have made efforts to implement preventative services and identifies examples of innovation and good practice, the Care Act’s vision for prevention is not being fully realised and that local authorities in England need to provide more services that prevent, reduce or delay the need for care and support. The report also identified shortcomings in plans for integrating health and social care. Barriers to implementing preventive services include: a lack of clarity on what is meant by prevention and integration, resistance to cultural change, and reduced resources. The report makes recommendations to support a better and integrated, preventative care system.

The obstacle course: overcoming the barriers to a better later life

CHRISTIE Amelia, McDOWELL Adrian
2017

This report looks at some of the issues older people and their families face in accessing the services and support they need to remain independent and live healthy, enjoyable lives. The report draws on an analysis of calls received to the Independent Age advice Helpline in 2016 and findings from other charities, think tanks and government reports. It focuses on four topic areas: help with serious health needs; understanding social care and the barriers to accessing support when they need personal care and practical help, securing a decent income and access to benefits; and staying in control which looks at some of the major life changes older people can experience, in relation to their finances and housing. For each topic area, the report examines the most common issues older people face and includes individual stories older people and their family members which show the difference early intervention can make, as well as where things are going wrong. It also highlights emerging issues which may get worse in the future, if not addressed. The report concludes that the country is still not responding well enough for a rapidly ageing population. It offers some recommendations to improve health, care and social security services for older people.

Quick guide: supporting patients' choices to avoid long hospital stays

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2016

This quick guide provides practical advice to help local health and social care systems reduce the time people spend in hospital when they no longer need acute care, but are delayed whilst making decisions about or making arrangements for their ongoing care. The guide covers: providing people with information about their choices after hospital discharge, providing support to allow patients to make choices about their ongoing care, the availability of care homes and care packages at home, a patients refusal to leave hospital, and use of interim packages and placements. Each section includes a checklist of actions to consider to help identify areas for improvement and examples of practical solutions to common problems, including links to useful resources. A template policy and template patient letters that can be customised and used locally are also included.

Building the right support: a national plan to develop community services and close inpatient facilities for people with learning disability...including those with a mental health condition

NHS ENGLAND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

Sets out a national plan to enable people with learning disabilities who display behaviour that challenges to be supported to live more independently in their local community and reduce reliance on institutional care and long stay hospitals. The plan looks at the learning from the six 'fast track' areas; describes the new services that will be needed to better support people with learning disabilities to live in the community; and outlines how transforming care partnerships (commissioning collaborations of local authorities, CCGs and NHS England partners) in health and care will need to work together to deliver these changes. Areas discussed include: the need for appropriate local housing, such as schemes where people have their own home but ready access to on-site support staff; an expansion of the use of personal budgets, enabling people and their families to plan their own care, beyond those who already have a legal right to them; for people to have access to a local care and support navigator or key worker; and investment in advocacy and advice services run by local charities and voluntary organisations. To achieve the shift from inpatient to community-based services the plan identifies three key changes: that local councils and NHS bodies will join together to deliver better and more coordinated services; pooled budgets between the NHS and local councils to ensure the right care is provided in the right place; and adoption of a new service model.

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan
2015

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part B: toolkit

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Provides a framework to help local authorities implement a test of care market sustainability, and offers insights about when a provider requires further monitoring. Many local authorities have developed highly effective systems for gathering local market intelligence in relation to the part of the market with which they contract for services. This intelligence may be gathered both formally and informally and involve a broad range of approaches. This toolkit is designed to complement such approaches by providing a clear structure for local authorities to consider the totality of the local market, only a proportion of which they will directly contract with. There are five phases to the application of the toolkit: determining local market segmentation; evaluation of external indicators; evaluation of sub market composition indicators; forming a judgement on sustainability and deciding which ‘hard to replace’ providers to monitor; and understanding and monitoring the sustainability of ’hard to replace’ providers.

Results 1 - 10 of 25

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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