#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'social care provision'

Results 11 - 20 of 21

LGA Adult social care efficiency programme: the final report

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

This is the concluding report from the LGA Adult Social Care Efficiency (ASCE) programme. The programme was launched in 2011 in response to the significant cuts to council budgets and their impact on adult social care. The aim of the programme is to support councils to develop transformational approaches to making the efficiency savings required to meet the challenge of reduced funding. The report shares innovative and transformational examples of how councils are bringing together businesses, public sector partners and communities to develop lower-cost solutions to support the most vulnerable in our society. In particular, it outlines some key lessons around developing a new contract with citizens and communities, managing demand, transformation, commissioning, procurement and contract management, and integration. It looks at efficiency approaches in practice, with specific reference to assessment, advice and information, delivering preventative services, avoiding admissions and reducing costs of residential care, reducing costs in domiciliary care and transforming learning disability services. In addition, it considers local approaches to developing effective internal management, reshaping the service and working with partners, customers and suppliers.

Improving later life: services for older people: what works

AGE UK
2014

This report presents jargon-free summaries of research on key aspects of services for older people, each written by experts in their field. It also draws out seven major themes from the research covering service design, the role of carers, the need for regular assessment, and the importance of social interaction. Contributors cover the following areas: service cost-effectiveness, what works in integrating health and care, dignity of older service users, safeguarding, supporting older people and their carers, council managed personal budgets, paying for social care, involving older people in evaluation and research, preventing isolation and loneliness, promoting inclusion in rural communities, housing with care, home telecare, supporting older people in the community, services for men, falls prevention, assistive technology for people with dementia, cognitive stimulation therapy for people with dementia, and memory services.

Assistive technology as a means of supporting people with dementia: a review

BONNER Steve, IDRIS Tahir
2012

Awareness of Assistive Technology (AT) products, devices and solutions available is still sketchy and variable around the UK. There is almost a ‘postcode lottery’ relating to the quality of AT solutions available to people with dementia due to the varying approaches taken around the country. This paper reviews the current policy and practice in relation to AT supporting people to live well with dementia, including different housing settings and rounding off with some good practice case studies which highlight the wide array of technology solutions available. Included in this review are: a brief summary of different types of AT; a review of policy initiatives, including legislation, which have attempted to encourage the greater use of AT; ethical considerations; current practice by major housing providers; good practice examples; and people with dementia’s experience.

Impact assessment toolkit: commissioning assistive technologies

SKILLS FOR CARE
2014

This online tool outlines the key steps of planning and implementing the impact assessment of assisted living technologies (ALT) and assistive living services (ALT). It includes practical tips, links to other sources of guidance and areas to discuss with partners. The toolkit covers designing an evaluation framework; assigning impact measures; establishing a sample of people to assess impact; establishing unit costs; developing data capture research tools; measuring return on investment; quality control; and using the findings to inform future delivery. The tool should be used in conjunction with two accompanying reports: 'Supporting commissioners of assisted living Services: stage 1: research report' and 'Commissioning assisted living technologies: guidance'.

‘The Billion Dollar Question’: embedding prevention in older people's services—Ten ‘High-Impact’ changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2013

With ageing populations, social changes and rising public expectations, many countries are exploring ways of developing a more preventative approach within their health and social care services. In England, this has become a growing priority over time—made even more significant by recent economic change and by the urgent need to reduce public sector spending. However, a key dilemma for policy makers and managers is the patchy nature of the evidence base—with a lack of certainty over how to reform services or prioritise spending in order to develop a more genuinely preventative approach. Against this background, this commentary reviews national and international evidence around ten policy measures and interventions, highlighting some of the most promising approaches as well as the fragmented and contested nature of the evidence base.

Prevention services, social care and older people: much discussed but little researched?

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2013

A scoping study investigated approaches to prevention services in local authorities which enable older people to retain their independence for as long as possible to maintain their quality of life and reduce pressure on local authority and NHS budgets. The study involved a survey of Directors of Adult Social Services in 9 local authorities to identify what they viewed as their top 3 investments in prevention services for older people, and interviews with lead managers for each intervention. It also reviewed local and national evidence as to whether these interventions lead to a delay or reduction in uptake of social care services This paper summarises the key findings from the research. It explains that the top 3 interventions were reablement (a top 3 approach for all of the local authorities surveyed), technology-based interventions (among the top 3 interventions in 6 authorities), and information and advice (among the top 3 in 3 authorities), while a number of other prevention interventions were identified by one local authority each. It reports on how local authorities seek evidence and guidance on prevention services and factors influencing how local funding was spent, and on assessment of the outcomes and impact of prevention interventions. It also summarises national and local evidence for the top 3 interventions.

Prevention matters: delivering a prevention-focused model for adult services in Buckinghamshire County Council

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
2012

Sets out a prevention-focused model of adult health and social care services which place emphasis on maintaining people’s independence and resilience; preventing deterioration into substantial or critical categories of need. The document outlines the current system challenges, the existing lack of joint working between sectors and services, a reactive approach to creating support services and networks and a lack of confidence or capacity to innovate and invest in prevention without an evidence base or business case. It then presents a framework for building the evidence for investment in prevention, proposing a measurement methodology and a definition of the target user group and of outcomes and impact. The document puts forward a new prevention-orientated service model, identifying the high‐level functions, which are shared by different agents and delivery mechanisms, on which the model rests. These are: intelligence and knowledge about the effectiveness of prevention‐related activities, bridging and building networks between formal and informal service delivery, connecting people, maximising existing resources and motivating and enabling. The document examines the core components of the model, which include an intelligence hub, a volunteer hub, community links officers, and community prevention officers. Funding and implementation considerations are also included.

Ending the other care crisis: making the case for investment in preventative care and support for disabled adults

AIDEN Hardeep, BUSH Marc
2013

A third of all people using care services are disabled adults of working age. This pamphlet builds on the analysis in 'The other care crisis', which provided evidence that exposed the £1.2 billion gap in social care spending for disabled adults. Based on new research undertaken by Deloitte, this pamphlet quantifies the long-term savings to individuals and the Government of closing this gap in social care expenditure. It recommends that the Government's Spending Review should commit to establishing a national minimum threshold for eligibility that encourages councils to provide social care to people with ‘moderate’ or equivalent level needs The Government should encourage councils and the NHS to jointly invest in preventative care and support through Health and Wellbeing Boards. The Care Bill should contain a duty on Health and Wellbeing Boards to identify, plan for and commission preventative services that maximise the independence of disabled people. This should be a statutory part of their Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and Health and Wellbeing strategies. The pamphlet has been jointly produced by the National Autistic Society, Mencap, the Lenard Cheshire Disability, Sense, and Scope.

Exploring the contribution of self-assessment to preventative services in social care

ABENDSTERN Michele, et al
2014

Prevention, comprising services that seek to delay deterioration of existing conditions and circumstances or prevent their occurrence by early access to support, is recognised as having an important role in adult social care. The gateway to social care services has traditionally been via needs-led assessments undertaken with professionals. In England, self-assessment, promoted as a means of accessing services more independently, has come to the fore in recent years. This article explores the relationship between prevention and self-assessment in practice. Data are derived from interviews with social services managers of five self-assessment projects situated within the adult social care sector that were described as providing a preventative approach, as well as project development documentation. A number of issues are highlighted including for whom self-assessment might be most optimal, the potential of self-assessment to widen access and the role it can play in promoting self-determination. It is argued that a natural relationship exists between self-assessment and prevention and that both concepts are at the core of the personalisation agenda. However, in order to achieve its potential in practice, self-assessment must be offered in conjunction with support and as an additional rather than alternative means of accessing preventative services.

The user voice: older people's experiences of reablement and rehabilitation

TRAPPES-LOMAX Tessa, HAWTON Annie
2012

Effective reablement is dependent on service users' co-operation and motivation. It therefore needs to be highly responsive to their needs and views. This study offers specific user views about their experiences in different settings and at different stages of reablement, together with their ideas for how it might work better. The study describes the experiences of 42 older people in rehabilitation services in community hospitals and local authority short-term residential units followed by “usual care” services at home. It is based on semi-structured face-to-face interviews in 2002/3, from East and Mid Devon, England. Findings revealed four main themes: the complexity of rehabilitative need; the influence of the setting; the role of the staff; and the availability of reablement support back at home. The authors concluded that the findings demonstrate changing rehabilitative needs along the care pathway, with implications for commissioners and providers of reablement services.

Results 11 - 20 of 21

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#