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Results for 'social inclusion'

Results 1 - 10 of 32

Nine ways to connect your care home with the community: a guide for care homes

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FORUM FOR INCLUSION, TIMEBANKING UK
2020

This guide draws out some of the lessons from the final evaluation of Time to Connect, a project to help people living in care settings to play a greater part in the life of their community. It makes nine suggestions of ways for a care home to connect with its community, all based on based real-life examples. They include bringing in visiting services, such as leisure or health services; supporting residents to host their own guests and groups; strengthening existing contacts and creating new links in the community; and connecting and organising activities with other care homes.

Hear and now: the impact of an intergenerational arts and health project on participant wellbeing

JENKINS Lindsay, FARRER Rachel, AUJLA Imogen
2020

This research explores the impact that an intergenerational arts and health project can have upon wellbeing, with a particular focus on the benefits that intergenerational practice can provide in relation to quality of life, affect, and social inclusion. It is based on Hear and Now, an award-winning, intergenerational community arts project developed by the Philharmonia Orchestra and Orchestras Live in Bedford, which brought together older adults living with dementia and young people. The study looked at the impact on the participant end users, and also the experiences of their carers and the artists and support staff who facilitated the project. Data were collected through observations of the workshops and focus groups. Researchers used the PERMA model of wellbeing to reflect on the impact of the project. The results found that participants reported: many positive emotions; a high level of engagement; the creation of positive relationships and new connections; that the project had meaning and that they felt of value; and an overall sense of achievement and accomplishment. The findings highlight the holistic impact of intergenerational arts and its ability to create a sense of belonging and purpose that unites different sectors of the community. The report also highlights key learning for future projects.

Healing the generational divide: interim report on intergenerational connection

ALL-PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON SOCIAL INTEGRATION
2019

Interim report of the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Social Integration inquiry on intergenerational connection, which examines the current gap between older and younger people, and what can be done to bridge it. The report sets out a series of suggestions to bring people of all ages and backgrounds together under four main policy areas: community projects and initiatives; public services; housing and planning; and technology. The report highlights how intergenerational projects are particularly effective in achieving social integration, improving wellbeing and tackling loneliness. It also includes examples of successful initiatives It highlights the benefits of taking a whole-society approach, including all policy areas and involving national and local government, not-for-profit organisations, the private sector and academia. Specific recommendations include: for nurseries, schools and care homes to foster connections between the different generations who use their services and, where possible, to co-locate services on one site and the creation of a national volunteering scheme that encourages older people to volunteer in their communities when they retire.

Adopt a Care Home: an intergenerational initiative bringing children into care homes

DI BONA Laura, KENNEDY Sheila, MOUNTAIN Gail
2019

Dementia friendly communities, in which people living with dementia actively participate and those around them are educated about dementia, may improve the wellbeing of those living with dementia and reduce the associated stigma. The Adopt a Care Home scheme aims to contribute towards this by teaching schoolchildren about dementia and linking them with people living with dementia in a local care home. Forty-one children, 10 people living with dementia and 8 school/care home staff participated in a mixed methods (questionnaires, observations, interviews and focus groups) evaluation to assess the scheme’s feasibility and impact. Data were analysed statistically and thematically. The scheme was successfully implemented, increased children’s dementia awareness and appeared enjoyable for most participants. Findings, therefore, demonstrate the scheme’s potential to contribute towards dementia friendly communities by increasing children’s knowledge and understanding of dementia and engaging people living with dementia in an enjoyable activity, increasing their social inclusion.

Working inclusively to make communities age-friendly: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing paper looks at how to design effective and inclusive ways of working to reach more older people in minority or marginalised communities. It argues that equality, diversity and inclusivity are central to understanding and reducing social isolation, and looks at key ways to embed inclusion in building age-friendly communities. These include: having a good understanding of communities themselves; designing genuinely inclusive opportunities, as well delivering targeted approaches; and working with an equalities mindset. The briefing draws on learning from research and reflection by the Ambition for Ageing Equalities Board. This briefing will be of interest to those working to tackle loneliness and social isolation of older people from marginalised communities, and those concerned that community and neighbourhood-level work reaches people in marginalised communities.

The state of play: Arts and Older People programme

ARTS COUNCIL OF NORTHERN IRELAND
2018

Summary findings on the impact of the Arts and Older People Programme in Northern Ireland, which aims to provide older people with the opportunity to participate in arts activities that contribute to their health and wellbeing. The programme - which is jointly funded by ACNI, the Baring Foundation and the Public Health Agency - targets poverty, isolation and loneliness and provides opportunities for social interaction to help build confidence and resilience. The report provides details of the programme impact against the agreed performance indicators of: isolation and loneliness, social inclusion, poverty, health/dementia, and strengthening the voice of older people. Includes short case study examples of the initiatives.

What is the impact on health and wellbeing of interventions that foster respect and social inclusion in community-residing older adults? A systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies

RONZI S., et al
2018

Background: Many interventions have been developed to promote respect and social inclusion among older people, but the evidence on their impacts on health has not been synthesised. This systematic review aims to appraise the state of the evidence across the quantitative and qualitative literature. Methods: Eligible studies published between 1990 and 2015 were identified by scanning seven bibliographic databases using a pre-piloted strategy, searching grey literature and contacting experts. Studies were included if they assessed the impact (quantitatively) and/or perceived impact (qualitatively) of an intervention promoting respect and social inclusion on the physical or mental health of community-residing people aged 60 years and older. Titles and abstracts were screened for eligibility by one reviewer. A second reviewer independently screened a 10% random sample. Full texts were screened for eligibility by one reviewer, with verification by another reviewer. Risk of bias was assessed using standardised tools. Findings were summarised using narrative synthesis, harvest plots and logic models to depict the potential pathways to health outcomes. Results: Of the 27,354 records retrieved, 40 studies (23 quantitative, 6 qualitative, 11 mixed methods) were included. All studies were conducted in high and upper middle-income countries. Interventions involved mentoring, intergenerational and multi-activity programmes, dancing, music and singing, art and culture and information-communication technology. Most studies (n = 24) were at high or moderate risk of bias. Music and singing, intergenerational interventions, art and culture and multi-activity interventions were associated with an overall positive impact on health outcomes. This included depression (n = 3), wellbeing (n = 3), subjective health (n = 2), quality of life (n = 2), perceived stress and mental health (n = 2) and physical health (n = 2). Qualitative studies offered explanations for mediating factors (e.g. improved self-esteem) that may lead to improved health outcomes and contributed to the assessment of causation. Conclusions: Whilst this review suggests that some interventions may positively impact on the health outcomes of older people, and identified mediating factors to health outcomes, the evidence is based on studies with heterogeneous methodologies. Many of the interventions were delivered as projects to selected groups, raising important questions about the feasibility of wider implementation and the potential for population-wide benefits.

Gig buddies: project report: January 2013 - December 2014

STAY UP LATE
2015

This evaluation report looks at how the Gig Buddies scheme has developed, the lessons learned, and the way support is offered to people to be less socially isolated while new types of volunteers are created in the process. Gig Buddies is a project that pairs up people with and without learning disabilities in Sussex to be friends and to go to events together. This report also looks at the plans to replicate Gig Buddies as a social franchise (‘Gig Buddies in a box’) by sharing experience and creating a model that enables replication, whilst also protecting the integrity of the project. The report argues that the pilot project demonstrates that Gig Buddies has the potential to transform communities, enabling many more people with learning disabilities and autism to be less socially isolated and unleashing the capacity of communities to become more involved in voluntary work.

Promising approaches to living well with dementia

JOPLING Kate
2017

This report provides a practical resource for individuals and organisations working in communities to support people living with dementia, and their carers to live well. It identifies interventions that are evidenced, cost effective and scalable, and which could be replicated by NHS Trusts, care providers and primary care services. The services highlighted include counselling for the newly diagnosed; encouraging people to get involved in arts and crafts activities; and helping people to reminisce through dance. It also proposes a framework to help understand these different approaches and the way they can be brought together in communities. This framework covers: Foundation services - which support people with dementia to access direct interventions; Direct interventions - to help support personal wellbeing, positive relationships, and active daily lives; Enabling services, which includes technology, transport and housing and care; and Structural factors - approaches in policy and practice which support effective development of appropriate services and systems., such as rights-based approaches and dementia friendly communities. Twenty five case studies are included to highlight the range of activity across the country. It makes recommendations for people with dementia and their carer, service providers and local authorities and health bodies involved with planning community responses to dementia.

Results 1 - 10 of 32

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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