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Results for 'social inclusion'

Results 11 - 20 of 21

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA
2015

This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

Improving later life: vulnerability and resilience in older people

AGE UK
2015

A summary of the available evidence regarding the maintenance of resilience in older people, examining some of the factors and experiences that make older people more susceptible to the risk of adverse outcomes and exploring strategies to help build resilience in later life. The key topics covered are: social engagement; resources, including financial resources, housing and age-friendly neighbourhoods; health and disability; cognitive and mental health; and carers. The paper makes a number of recommendations, including: adopt a holistic view of all kinds of vulnerability in later life as the main focus rather concentrating on parts of the problem or parts of the body; make better use of the research evidence to identify problems earlier and to target resources; concentrate more on combating the effects of neighbourhood deprivation; work towards providing an age-friendly environment; facilitate home adaptations, aids and a better range of housing options; and root out ageism among professionals and society in general.

Singing for successful ageing: the perceived benefits of participating in the Golden Oldies community-arts programme

TEATER Barbara, BALDWIN Mark
2014

Community-based preventative programmes are increasing in demand as the UK seeks alternative ways of supporting the growing number of older adults. As the use and promotion of preventative programmes increase, so does the need for evidence supporting their effectiveness. Through the use of mixed methods, this study explored a singing community-arts programme, the Golden Oldies, to determine the extent to which the programme contributes to participants' (n = 120) sense of health, self-development and social connectedness. Quantitative analyses found that between 73.1 and 98.3 per cent of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the Golden Oldies contributed to their self-development, health and sense of community as well as revealing a statistically significant increase in self-reported health prior to participation in the programme to the time of the study. Qualitative analysis (n = 5) revealed three themes—the Golden Oldies as: (i) a reduction in social isolation and increase in social contact; (ii) a therapeutic source; and (iii) a new lease for life. The results provide evidence of the preventative nature of the Golden Oldies programme through self-reported improvements in health and social relationships where social connections appeared to be the important thread that contributed to the perceived benefits. Implications for policy, practice and research are discussed.

Rotherham Social Prescribing Scheme

Voluntary Action Rotherham

Voluntary Action Rotherham, on behalf of NHS Rotherham CCG, co-ordinates a social prescribing scheme which links patients with long term conditions in primary care and their carers with sources of non-medical support in their community. By connecting people with a range of voluntary and community sector-led interventions, such as exercise/mobility activities, community transport, befriending and peer mentoring, art and craft sessions, carer’s respite, (to name a few), the scheme aims to lead to improved social and clinical outcomes for people with long-term conditions and their carers; more cost-effective use of NHS and social care resources and to the development of a wider, more diverse range of local community services.

Promising approaches: to reducing loneliness and isolation in later life

JOPLING Kate
2015

This report raises concerns that loneliness and social isolation among older people is becoming a serious public health issue. It draws on the views of experts and research evidence to set out a new framework for understanding and tackling loneliness in older people. The approach is based around three key challenges: reaching individuals; understanding the specific circumstances of an individual's loneliness; and supporting individuals to take up services that would help. Sections of the report cover: the foundation services (reaching, understanding and supporting individuals); the types of intervention that are most likely to meet older people's need for social contact; how technology and transport can facilitate social connection; and 'structural enablers' focusing on how services are delivered (i.e., at neighbourhood level, community development, volunteering, and age positive approaches). It also highlights areas where a greater understanding of how to address loneliness within the older community is needed: within care settings; in black and minority ethnic groups; and with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans older people. Case studies are used throughout to demonstrate the variety of solutions needed to address a very personal and individual problem. Includes specific recommendations for service providers, commissioners and those involved with search.

Developing the power of strong, inclusive communities

MILLER Clive, WILTON Catherine
2014

Sets out a strategy, which can be adapted locally, for how health and wellbeing boards can fulfil new wellbeing and prevention duties under the Care Act. The framework supports the development of strong and inclusive communities and indicates how people, communities and services can more effectively and efficiently work together to co-produce outcomes. The framework incorporates key areas of action for the health and wellbeing boards, which include: keep people at the centre and focus on their outcomes; focus on both assets and needs; focus on all levels of prevention; rethink integration; target people with two or more long term conditions; work through universal service providers; enable community and cross-sector systems leadership; develop a new approach to health and wellbeing strategies; and adopt a collaborative approach to priority setting and savings. The framework has been trialled with a number of trailblazer health and wellbeing boards each of whom refined and adapted it to reflect local circumstances.

Outcomes of the active at 60 community agent programme: research report

HATAMIAN Areenay, PEARMAIN Daniel, GOLDEN Sarah
2012

The Active at 60 Community Agents programme was a Department for Work and Pensions fund to encourage community groups and their volunteers to help people approaching and post retirement (particularly those at risk of social isolation and loneliness in later life) to stay or become active and positively engaged with society. It was launched in March 2011 and ran until December 2011. This evaluation of the programme included surveys and interviews with local funders, group leaders, community agents (volunteers whose role aimed to empower and support older people to become and/or stay active) and older people. The report describes the background and methodology of the study and presents the findings, covering the role of Community Agents, reaching and engaging older people, what groups did with the funding, what difference the programme made to older people who took part and wider benefits, the legacy of the programme, and the role of local funders and programme management. It also discusses how far the programme achieved its aims and sets out key lessons learned.

Art in recovery: from participation to independence

ASTON Tracy
2013

Purpose: This paper aims to describe a partnership visual arts project between Richmond Fellowship (a national mental health charity) and the Bluecoat arts centre in Liverpool involving participants with mental health problems. Design/methodology/approach: The paper details the development of the project since September 2010 and, most importantly, the artistic development of the individuals who are still taking part and the improvements in their mental health and wellbeing. It also describes the development of the group in becoming an independent organisation. Findings: Evaluation was undertaken at regular intervals through wellbeing questionnaires, one-to-one interviews and observation, which led to the following findings: with support, individuals with mental health problems experience significant benefit in engaging with the arts, to their mental health, their personal development and development as artists. Given time, they require less support and are willing to take on responsibilities, which has enabled them to become an independent organisation. Social implications: This paper makes the case for the effectiveness of partnership working between mental health and arts organisations to improve mental health and social inclusion. Originality/value: The paper adds to the body of evidence concerning the use of arts in recovery and of use to mental health organisations who are interested in using the arts in the process of support.

Creating a recovery focused workforce: supporting staff well-being and valuing the expertise of lived experience

WALKER Liz, PERKINS Rachel, REPPER Julie
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to argue that if mental health services are to genuinely support the recovery of those who they serve then recovery principles must permeate all facets of the organisation, in particular human resources and workforce development. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws on the principles of recovery-focused approaches to people who use services and explores how these might guide a recovery-focused approaches to human resources and workforce issues. Findings: The recovery principles like recognising and utilising the expertise of lived experience, co-production and shared decision making, peer support, focusing on strengths and becoming an expert in your own self-care all have as much relevance for creating a recovery-focused workforce as they do in the recovery journeys of those who use services. Everyone who uses services is “more than a mental patient” and everyone who provides services is “more than a mental health practitioner” – we need to use all the assets that everyone brings. Originality/value: Although there has been a great deal of discussion about the features of recovery-focused services, there has been little, if any, consideration of extending the principles of recovery to human resources. The aim of this paper is not to offer a blue print but to begin an exploration of what a recovery-focused approach to workforce issues might look like.

Mental health recovery is social

HOLTTUM Sue
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarise two 2014 research papers that highlight the role of social interactions and the social world in recovery in the context of mental distress. Design/methodology/approach: The author summarise two papers: one is about two theories from social psychology that help us understand social identity – our sense of who we are. The other brings together and looks at the similarities and differences between ten different therapies that can be called resource-oriented – that is, they focus on people's strengths and resources rather than what is wrong with them. Findings: The paper on social identity gives a convincing case for incorporating teaching about social identity – and the social groups to which people belong – into the training of mental health professionals. The paper on resource-oriented therapies suggests that social relationships are a main component of all ten therapies examined. This second paper suggested a need for more research and theory relating to resource-oriented therapies. Social identity theory could help address this issue. Mental health services may be able to help people more by focusing on their established and desired social identities and group-belonging, and their strengths, than is usual. Originality/value: These two papers seem timely given the growing recognition of the role of social factors in the development and maintenance of mental distress. More attention to social factors in recovery could help make it more self-sustaining.

Results 11 - 20 of 21

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