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Results for 'social isolation'

Results 1 - 10 of 121

Review of the impact of loneliness and social isolation on health and well-being and whether people who experience loneliness/social isolation have higher use of public services

WEAKLAND John H, OWENS Janine, SIROIS Fuschia M.
2019

This research, carried out by the University of Sheffield and OB3 Research, explores whether loneliness and social isolation result in increased use of public and health services. It also looks at the types of contexts that led to increased or decreased service use as a result of loneliness and social isolation. The research involved a scoping review of the literature, a meta-analysis of nine papers and a consultation with 10 key organisations representing a range of groups in Wales. The consultation identified issues for a number of groups, including children, older people, refugees and asylum seekers, LGBTQ people, single parents, and carers. The findings suggest that loneliness and social isolation do play a part in increased use of services, but that loneliness and social isolation alone do not create the conditions for increased service use. Perceptions of loneliness and social isolation for the service users can also be intensified by inconsistency in accessing services, particularly for those who are from already stigmatised groups. The report discusses key themes and their relationship with loneliness, social isolation, access to services and service use. Including: stigma and service use; service related barriers; bullying and victimisation; disabilities; housing, poverty, and changes to service delivery. It makes 16 recommendations for the Welsh Government, which include: for research into loneliness and social isolation, and the recruitment of more peer support workers into the voluntary and public sector to support different groups of people.

Combatting social isolation and increasing social participation of older adults through the use of technology: a systematic review of existing evidence

BAKER Steven, et al
2018

Objectives: There are growing concerns that social isolation presents risks to older people's health and well‐being. Thus, the objective of the review was to explore how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation, hence improving social outcomes for older people. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted across the social science and human‐computer interaction databases. Results: A total of 36 papers met the inclusion criteria and were analysed using a four‐step process. Findings were threefold, suggesting that: (i) technologies principally utilised social network services and touch‐screen technologies; (ii) social outcomes are often ill‐defined or not defined at all; and (iii) methodologies used to evaluate interventions were often limited and small‐scale. Conclusion: Results suggest a need for studies that examine new and innovative forms of technology, evaluated with rigorous methodologies, and drawing on clear definitions about how these technologies address social isolation/participation. Policy Impact: This systematic review explores how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation for older people. A unique aspect of this review is that it incorporates smaller design studies and prototypes. These insights will benefit those considering the potential for information and communication technologies to contribute to older adults’ health and well‐being. Practice Impact: This systematic review explores how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation for older people. Insights from the review will benefit practitioners seeking to understand the broad range of technologies that are being applied to these issues, and the common benefits and challenges associated with each approach.

North London Cares and South London Cares evaluation: final report

HITCHIN John, PETIE Olivia, NORRLANDER Amanda
2019

An evaluation Love Your Neighbour and Social Clubs, two programmes to reduce loneliness, improve intergenerational relationships and create a greater sense of community. The programmes, which aimed to bring together people of different generations to spend time together, were delivered across the London based charities North London Cares and South London Cares as part of The Cares Family’s model. The Social clubs programme brings together groups of younger and older neighbours to get involved in activities and socialise; and Love Your Neighbour focuses on one-to-one friendships between older and younger neighbours. The evaluation examines the outcomes for young and older neighbours, the strengths and weaknesses of the model, and highlights the challenges of evaluating community-based models. The evaluation found that overall, The Cares Family model is contributing to positive outcomes in four areas: reduced loneliness and isolation, particularly for older neighbours; improved understanding across the generations; a sense of belonging; and an increased connection to self.

An evidence summary of health inequalities in older populations in coastal and rural areas: full report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2019

A rapid evidence review on the health inequalities experienced by older people in coastal and rural areas, supplemented with case studies. The review aimed to identify key determinants of health inequalities experienced by older populations in coastal and rural areas; looks at the strengths and assets of ageing populations in these areas; reviews the effectiveness health and social care system interventions and whole system approaches; and assess the opportunities for using digital technology. In addition to a rapid review of the national literature (covering the UK and Ireland), a search of international literature focusing on interventions to reduce health inequalities was also carried out. It is intended for local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and other health and care organisations to inform strategic planning, service design and commissioning, as well as the development of local community infrastructure. It also provides summary of key considerations in taking an asset-based approach in reducing inequalities and promoting productive healthy ageing in these areas. Two accompanying reports have also been published, an executive summary with main messages and an annex of included studies.

Loneliness: a reading list

BELLIS Alexander
2019

A selective reading list on loneliness, focusing mainly on research published since 2010. The references discuss both direct and indirect links to outcomes, both social isolation and loneliness or both causes and interventions. The references are categorised into several themes, which include: age-related studies, veterans, homelessness, disabled people, BAME communities, LGBT people, links to health and mental health, social media, costs of loneliness, and loneliness interventions. Not all are based on data from the UK.

Tackling loneliness

BELLIS Alexander
2019

This briefing paper provides an overview of the Government's Loneliness Strategy, 'A connected society' (2018), which set out cross-departmental measures on how the Government would provide 'national leadership' to tackle loneliness in England. It also looks at the steps taken so far by the Government and research into the causes and impact of loneliness and possible interventions. It also briefly looks at loneliness strategies in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Dance to Health 'Phase 1 roll-out [test and learn]' evaluation: first report

SHEFFIELD HALLAM UNIVERSITY. Sport Industry Research Centre
2019

An evaluation of the Dance to Health falls prevention dance programme. The evaluation investigates whether Dance to Health is an effective and cost-effective way to address older people’s falls and whether the programme helps older people in danger of falling overcome lost confidence, reduced independence and increased isolation. The evaluation used a mixed methods approach that included quantitative, qualitative and econometric research. Primary outcome measures included the impact on falls, positive side-effects (mentally and physically), patient pull, attendance and adherence, fidelity to existing falls prevention programmes and cost effectiveness. The findings show that Dance to Health is helping older people in danger of falling overcome lost confidence, reduced independence and increased isolation. There was a 44 percent reduction in the number of falls, positive improvements in participants' physical and mental wellbeing, including improved Timed Up and Go (TUG) times and reduced fear of falling. Additionally, based on the analysis conducted, there is a potential cost saving of over £149m over a 2-year period, of which £120m is a potential cost saving for the NHS. Dance to Health's fidelity to existing physiotherapy programmes was also confirmed. The evidence suggests that Dance to Health offers the health system a more effective and cost-effective means to address the issue of older people's falls.

Going the extra step: a compendium of best practice in dementia care. Preventing unwanted isolation and loneliness for people with dementia living in housing with care

TWYFORD Katey, WELLS Wendy
2019

A collection of examples of extra care schemes and other housing related community services that support people with dementia to develop meaningful relationships, helping to reduce social isolation and loneliness. They include examples of personalised support that can be arranged for residents; examples of groups and social activities; and different organisational and community-based approaches that have been adopted. The examples range from informal arrangements supported by staff or other residents to formal service provision.

An evaluation of Rainbow Services community builder project: the Senior Safe and Social Programme

HAINES Sarah
2018

An evaluation of the Senior Safe and Social Project in Harlow, a project to reduce loneliness and social isolation in older people. The evaluation aims to provide an insight into why the model is working well, whether it could be applied to other demographics, how the approach compares with similar models, and the sustainability of the project. The project, based on an Asset Based Community Development (ABCD) model, provides weekly clubs and events in local communities, which are directed by older people themselves. The evaluation identified key factors identified that helped the model work. These included that social groups are design designed around the participants and give them control over what they do. Volunteers’ involvement in the project represents a reciprocal exchange, giving the volunteer the opportunity to socialise and sense of usefulness and connection in the local community. The evaluation suggests that the model could be applied to other locations and other age groups, such as young mothers and ‘empty nesters’. The report includes suggestions for the future development of the project.

Call&Check: a community service which disrupts the norm

DICKINSON Joe
2019

In this project presentation the author, inventor of Call&Check UK, describes the service which is designed to enable people to live independently and confidently in their own homes. Regular visits are made by a postman/postal operator and who asks five short questions to find out how the recipient is and if there is anything they need. Call&Check works not only for older people in communities but for many others who need that little extra support to live at home.

Results 1 - 10 of 121

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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