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Results for 'social isolation'

Results 1 - 10 of 132

Connecting communities: a strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation

WALES. Welsh Government
2020

The young person's and community version of the Welsh Government strategy to tackle loneliness and social isolation. It outlines the Government's plan to tackle loneliness and social isolation and build a more connected society. It covers four priority areas: providing more opportunities for people to connect; providing good quality transport, community spaces and internet that help people connect; cohesive and supportive communities; and raising awareness of loneliness and social isolation. The strategy will be supported by funding over three years to support community-based organisations to deliver and test innovative approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

Connected communities: a strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation and building stronger social connections

WALES. Welsh Government
2020

The Welsh Governnment's first strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation. It defines what is meant by loneliness and social isolation, describes the key priorities in tackling these issues and sets out the Government's approach for implementing the strategy. The strategy focuses on approaches that reduce the risk of, or prevent, loneliness and social isolation or that intervene early, before these become more entrenched. The strategy looks at the role Government can play and also how it can support local authorities, wider public services, the third sector and also the private sector. It also describes the important role that individuals can play in supporting each other in communities. The strategy has four priority areas: increasing opportunities for people to connect; improving the community infrastructure to support people to come together, including the areas of planning, housing and transport; cohesive and supportive communities; and build awareness and promote positive attitudes, which sets out how the Welsh Government will raise the profile of loneliness and social isolation and reduce stigma. Key commitments are listed under each priority area. The strategy will be supported by funding over three years to support community-based organisations to deliver and test innovative approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

Older people and social isolation: a review of the evidence

KINSELLA Sarah
2015

A review of the current literature and evidence on effective interventions to tackle social isolation amongst older people. Based on the findings from the review, the report recommends that: interventions should be targeted at those most at-risk; base their activities on the evidence of what works; and focus on providing group activities, particularly those which have an arts, educational learning or social focus and are participatory. It also recommends exploring the use of using new technologies, such as the internet and Skype.

The effectiveness of interventions for reducing subjective and objective social isolation among people with mental health problems: a systematic review

MA Ruimin, et al
2019

Purpose: Subjective and objective social isolation are important factors contributing to both physical and mental health problems, including premature mortality and depression. This systematic review evaluated the current evidence for the effectiveness of interventions to improve subjective and/or objective social isolation for people with mental health problems. Primary outcomes of interest included loneliness, perceived social support, and objective social isolation. Methods: Three databases were searched for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Studies were included if they evaluated interventions for people with mental health problems and had objective and/or subjective social isolation (including loneliness) as their primary outcome, or as one of a number of outcomes with none identified as primary. Results: In total, 30 RCTs met the review’s inclusion criteria: 15 included subjective social isolation as an outcome and 11 included objective social isolation. The remaining four evaluated both outcomes. There was considerable variability between trials in types of intervention and participants’ characteristics. Significant results were reported in a minority of trials, but methodological limitations, such as small sample size, restricted conclusions from many studies. Conclusion: The evidence is not yet strong enough to make specific recommendations for practice. Preliminary evidence suggests that promising interventions may include cognitive modification for subjective social isolation, and interventions with mixed strategies and supported socialisation for objective social isolation. This study highlights the need for more thorough, theory-driven intervention development and for well-designed and adequately powered RCTs.

Evidence scope: loneliness and social work

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health and Social Care
2020

This evidence scope looks at the role of social workers in preventing and reducing loneliness and isolation. It draws on a literature review and a survey of social work practitioners which was commissioned by the Chief Social Worker for Adults and carried out by Research in Practice for Adults. The scope provides key messages from research and practice in identifying people who are experiencing, or at risk of, chronic loneliness. It also presents evidence of effective interventions to prevent and reduce loneliness in the following areas: social activities, technology, partnership working with other agencies, human relationships, and being person centred and understanding every individual’s different experience of loneliness. Key messages for social workers and employers to inform the development of resources to improve practice are included.

Compassionate communities and collective memory: a conceptual framework to address the epidemic of loneliness

SIME Caroline, COLLINS Stephen
2019

In recent years, tackling loneliness has become the focus of increased scholarly debate, social intervention and the development of international policy. One response to the ‘epidemic of loneliness' has been the development of the compassionate communities model. The diversity of compassionate communities approaches has led to scholars such as Allan Kellehear (2005; 2017) to highlight a lack of a cohesive underpinning theory to support and drive policy development. This paper proposes the use of ‘collective memory’ as a novel approach to linking loneliness, memory and identity in a way that draws out conceptual links between the role compassionate communities play in tackling social isolation and loneliness. This paper suggests that the service-led approach that seeks to identify and transpose strategies from one community to another is ineffective; instead, the need to develop bespoke community-centred models that can be used by community nurses is emphasised.

The use of telephone befriending in low level support for socially isolated older people - an evaluation

CATTAN Mima, KIME Nicola, BAGNALL Anne-Marie
2011

Telephone befriending schemes have long been considered an effective method to reduce loneliness among older people. This study investigated the impact of a national scheme for 40 isolated and lonely older people, involving 8 project sites in the UK. It assessed the impact of different models of telephone-based befriending services on older people's health and well-being. Findings revealed that the service helped older people to gain confidence, re-engage with the community and become socially active again. Overall, three main topics were identified: why older people valued the service; what impact it had made on their health and well-being; and what they wanted from the service. Also, nine subtopics emerged: life is worth living; gaining a sense of belonging; knowing they had a friend; a healthy mind is a healthy body; the alleviation of loneliness and anxiety; increased self-confidence; ordinary conversation; a trusted and reliable service; the future - giving something back. In conclusion, telephone befriending schemes for older people provide low-cost means for socially isolated older people to become more confident and independent and develop a sense of self-respect.

A systematic review of loneliness interventions among non-elderly adults

BESSAHA Melissa L., et al
2019

Loneliness - the subjective experience of social isolation—is an important indicator of quality of life for adults and a major determinant of health. While much research has focused on interventions to alleviate loneliness in elderly populations, there has been no systematic investigation of loneliness interventions targeting the non-elderly adult population. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise current understanding on the effectiveness of interventions for alleviating loneliness among non-elderly adults. Littell et al.’s (Systematic reviews and meta-analysis, Oxford University Press, New York, 2008) systematic review process was used to organise, synthesise, and critique findings. An electronic search was conducted using relevant databases (CINAHL, Pubmed, PsycINFO, Social Work Abstracts) and keywords and index terms for three concepts: age, loneliness outcome, and intervention study. Study selection was limited to studies conducted in English, assessed a primary outcome measure of loneliness, and included a population of non-elderly adults ages 18 to 64. Out of 5813 studies identified for initial screening, 264 studies underwent full-text review, and 68 studies met inclusion criteria. Pairs of reviewers extracted and synthesised data including research design, sampling techniques, and outcomes. Results are grouped by primary sub-populations in which interventions were conducted including people with mental illnesses; disabilities; chronic illnesses; military members; parents and caregivers; immigrants and refugees; and other marginalised groups. Several interventions, particularly those involving technology and support groups, significantly reduced loneliness. This review informs clinical social work practice around programs that reduce loneliness and its consequences among specific sub-populations of non-elderly adults.

Single parents wellbeing: an evaluation of five Wellbeing Workshops in South Wales created and facilitated by Single Parents Wellbeing for single parents

FISHER Jackie, BURCHETT Nicole
2019

An evaluation of five Wellbeing Workshops to address the impact of social isolation on the mental health and wellbeing of single parents for single parents in Wales. The workshops brought single parents together to discuss issues that impact on their mental health and wellbeing and aimed to equip them with skills to support mental health and wellbeing and provide a social network to provide peer-led support beyond the life of the workshops. The workshops were delivered by Single Parents Wellbeing (SPW), a Community Interest Company that uses a peer-led approach to involves single parents in the planning and delivery of activities. A total of 48 out of the 58 single parents attending the workshops participated in the evaluation. Evaluation methods involved the collection of wellbeing information using the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS), an online survey to collect participants’ views of the Wellbeing Workshops, and additional in-depth telephone interviews with participants. The qualitative findings from interviews cover single parents feelings of isolation and loneliness, peer support, experience of stigma, difficulties with mental health and wellbeing, and experience of parenting alone. The evaluation found that the SPW was highly valued by the single parents that attended the Wellbeing Workshops. The Wellbeing Workshops also supported single parents to make positive changes in their lives that will improve mental health and wellbeing. The peer-led approach and combatting stigma underpins the way that the Wellbeing Workshops are delivered.

Ageing Better in Camden: interim evaluation report

REMBISZEWSKI Perla, BIDEY Tim, VANSON Tim
2018

The first of two interim evaluation reports to explore the outcomes projects commissioned by Ageing Better in Camden (ABC), a six-year programme to address social isolation and loneliness in older people living in Camden. This report focuses on the progress of 8 projects, which include a Digital Inclusion project; North London Cares Intergenerational and Men’s Action projects; Community Action Projects, and LGBT+ Connect providing opportunities for older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Camden to socialise. Each project focused chapter includes details of participants, evidence of impact and individual case studies. The evaluation draws on qualitative data from conversations with project participants and project leads, as well as quantitative data from demographic surveys. Early findings suggest that the projects are achieving the anticipated positive impacts for older people. Positive impacts include: improved mental and physical well-being; new friendships and connections; improved confidence and independence; relationship building across communities and generations. The evaluation found that frontline staff played a key role in enabling participants to achieve positive impacts.

Results 1 - 10 of 132

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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