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Results for 'social isolation'

Results 1 - 10 of 90

Evaluation of Time to Shine: year 2 interim findings

WIGFIELD Andrea, ALDEN Sarah
2017

Interim evaluation of Time to Shine, the Big Lottery funded Ageing Better programme running in Leeds, which is funding projects for specific groups most likely to experience isolation and loneliness. These include older men; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender older people (LGBT), Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) older people; and older people with learning disabilities. Based on analysis of the monitoring and evaluation data, the report provides an overview of what has been learnt about what works in reducing social isolation and loneliness and how the programme is leading to change at the individual, local, and citywide level drawing. It also reports on the commissioning process and looks at how co-production has been incorporated into design, and delivery and evaluation of the programme. It reports that as of 30 June 2017, over 5,600 people of all ages have been involved in Time to Shine projects in some way, including: over 2,600 older people participating regularly in Time to Shine projects and 335 older volunteers and 140 volunteers aged 49 or under helping to plan, deliver or steer projects. The results suggest that being involved in Time to Shine helped some people to feel they were more involved in their local area, improved life satisfaction scores.

Community connector schemes: Ageing Better programme learning

Ageing Better
2018

Reports on emerging evidence and learning from eight Ageing Better programme areas who are using Community Connector type roles. Community Connectors were defined as any mechanism that identifies isolated people over 50 and works with them to help them transition to less isolated through person-centred structured support. This includes community navigators, social prescribing and approaches that involve people overcoming specific barriers, for example mental health. The report provides some insights to policy makers, commissioners and practitioners to help them when shaping this type of service. This includes making the service work at each stage: entry points and first engagement, relationships building and activities, and moving on.

All the lonely people: loneliness in later life

AGE UK
2018

This report presents evidence about what Age UK know about loneliness amongst people aged 50 and over, what increases the chances of people experiencing loneliness and how best to help those older people who are persistently lonely. It focuses on the need for approaches to reducing loneliness to be tailored to the circumstances of the individual. The analysis shows that the risk of being often lonely is higher among those people who are widowed or who do not have someone to open up to. It also found that the risk of loneliness does vary because of age, although the risk factors may be different. Whilst social activities are an essential component of successful approaches to tackling loneliness, for many people activities are only effective when complemented by emotional and practical support to access them. This requires personalised support and neighbourhoods which encourage and facilitate people to participate in their communities. It concludes that the importance of good quality care, transport and other public amenities to achieve this means a genuinely cross-government approach is essential.

A connected society. A strategy for tackling loneliness: laying the foundations for change

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2018

This strategy builds on the work of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness and sets out the government's approach to tackling loneliness in England. The strategy highlights the role that everyone can play in tackling loneliness, including government, communities and the individual. The government's work on loneliness is guided by three overarching goals: building the evidence base, embedding loneliness as a consideration across government policy, and building a national conversation on loneliness, to raise awareness of its impacts and to help tackle stigma. Chapter one provides a summary of the existing evidence base on loneliness, including its impacts and causes. The following three chapters set out government commitments and partnerships in three areas seen as crucial to build a connected society. These are: organisations and services - how government, working with local authorities, health bodies, businesses and the voluntary sector will introduce a range of new initiatives that enable the everyday services we use to connect those at risk of loneliness to support; community infrastructure – such as accessing community space, transport and well designed housing; and building a culture that encourages strong social relationships – including tackling stigma surrounding loneliness and supporting community groups. Chapter five sets out how government will take this agenda forward and sets out a commitment from the Loneliness Action Group to continue its work until at least the end of 2019. The document highlights examples from practice throughout.

Resilience in an ageing Greater Manchester

BAGNALL Kirsty
2018

This report looks at the resilience of older people and the implications for ageing communities. It includes the findings from a literature review and from workshops with three marginalised groups: older South Asian women; older men living in a deprived area; and refugees. The report explores the importance of recognising the impact different marginalising characteristics on a person’s resilience. The findings suggest that although older people can be vulnerable to shocks and stresses, they also may possess assets to prepare themselves and to support others during an emergency. However, marginalisation and social isolation contribute towards an individual’s ability to react during times of shock. The report also found that older people with additional marginalising characteristics were often found to have high levels of bonding social capital, but struggle to make connections outside of their own community. In order to avoid further marginalisation of people, the report recommends the inclusion of a range of marginalised groups in resilience planning. The report makes recommendations on how policy makers can support the needs of older people across Greater Manchester.

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham year two report

MORETON Rachel, et al
2018

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham, part of a wider programme of 14 Ageing Better projects located across England taking an asset-based approach to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people. The evaluation covers activities completed between May 2017 and April 2018. It reports on the range of activities delivered, which included exercise and arts activities; key characteristics of successful activity; how networks are working to make their activities sustainable; and the ways in which activities are attracting male participants. Short case studies of the groups delivered are included throughout. Key findings show that Ageing Better in Birmingham is successfully engaging ethnically and age diverse participants and older adults who are the most-lonely. This has been achieved by mainly working through established voluntary and community groups, which it is noted may not always effective in those areas where the voluntary and community sector is less well developed. The evaluation found Network Leads play an important role in making a successful Network and that Networks involving physical activity appear to be associated with greater wellbeing gains for participants. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Dementia-friendly Brent: a model of community

TILKI Mary
2018

Report on the London borough of Brent's dynamic social movement helping to make the borough dementia friendly. Community Action on Dementia Brent (CADBrent) is a dynamic social movement that aims to make the London borough dementia friendly, accessible and inclusive of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Much has been achieved since the movement began five years ago. Some of the schemes discussed in the article include: Dementia peer support project; dementia friendly Mapesbury; The De-Cafe - memory cafe; Whole street of support; The Shed and Parnerships in Innovative Education.

The state of play: Arts and Older People programme

ARTS COUNCIL OF NORTHERN IRELAND
2018

Summary findings on the impact of the Arts and Older People Programme in Northern Ireland, which aims to provide older people with the opportunity to participate in arts activities that contribute to their health and wellbeing. The programme - which is jointly funded by ACNI, the Baring Foundation and the Public Health Agency - targets poverty, isolation and loneliness and provides opportunities for social interaction to help build confidence and resilience. The report provides details of the programme impact against the agreed performance indicators of: isolation and loneliness, social inclusion, poverty, health/dementia, and strengthening the voice of older people. Includes short case study examples of the initiatives.

Social isolation, loneliness and older people

SMITH Lauren
2018

A literature review on social isolation, loneliness and older people. The review provides citations and short summaries of the literature identified, covering the following themes: the community context, research around interventions, social capital, mental wellbeing, mobility and wellbeing, social inclusion and community building, digital engagement and evaluating interventions. The majority of articles included are systematic reviews and literature reviews. The review was commissioned by an alliance of older people’s forums to contribute to their response to the Scottish Government's draft strategy 'A connected Scotland: tackling social isolation and loneliness and building stronger communities'. It is not comprehensive but aims to provide links to perspectives from academic research that may be less commonly present within contributions to consultations.

What do we know about the relationship between internet-mediated interaction and social isolation and loneliness in later life?

BENEITO-MONTAGUT Roser, CASSIAN-YDE Nizaia, BEGUERIA Arantza
2018

Purpose: Social isolation and loneliness are recognised social, health and wellbeing problems that particularly affect later life. They have been the subject of many recent studies. Studies examining the role of the internet in addressing these problems have multiplied. However, it is still not known whether internet-mediated social interaction has any role in mitigating social isolation and or loneliness. To address this gap, the purpose of this paper is to review previous research that investigates the relationship between internet use for communication and social isolation and loneliness. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reviews the empirical literature published since 2000 and expands on previous literature reviews by including a variety of research designs and disciplines. Findings: Despite the recent increase in studies, there is still little evidence to show internet effects on social isolation and loneliness. It is concluded that future research programmes aimed at reducing them by the use of the internet should include more robust methodological and theoretical frameworks, employ longitudinal research designs and provide a more nuanced description of both the social phenomena (social isolation and loneliness) and internet-mediated social interaction. Originality/value: Previous reviews are not restricted to internet-based studies and include several types of interventions aiming at reducing social isolation and/or loneliness. They do not attempt to disentangle the internet effects of social isolation and loneliness.

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