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Results for 'social networks'

Results 1 - 10 of 71

Evaluating Ageing Better Isle of Wight: participant journeys

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

This research report looks at how the Ageing Better Isle of Wight Programme, known as Age Friendly Island, is working to reduce isolation by exploring how older people access, participate and move between the projects. It draws on quantitative data of multiple project use, and through in-depth qualitative interviews with individuals who have used more than one project. The research found that for some people, likely to be the more isolated or less connected people, accessing the first project can be key. Once people access a project, they are opened up to both informal networks of other people participating in the group and also the more formal networks of project leads, Community Navigators or volunteers. Both groups are able to introduce them to new projects, services and organisations. The report identifies what can facilitate this process by enabling older people to: hear about a project; go to a project; stay at a project; and move to another project.

Connecting communities: a strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation

WALES. Welsh Government
2020

The young person's and community version of the Welsh Government strategy to tackle loneliness and social isolation. It outlines the Government's plan to tackle loneliness and social isolation and build a more connected society. It covers four priority areas: providing more opportunities for people to connect; providing good quality transport, community spaces and internet that help people connect; cohesive and supportive communities; and raising awareness of loneliness and social isolation. The strategy will be supported by funding over three years to support community-based organisations to deliver and test innovative approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

Connected communities: a strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation and building stronger social connections

WALES. Welsh Government
2020

The Welsh Governnment's first strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation. It defines what is meant by loneliness and social isolation, describes the key priorities in tackling these issues and sets out the Government's approach for implementing the strategy. The strategy focuses on approaches that reduce the risk of, or prevent, loneliness and social isolation or that intervene early, before these become more entrenched. The strategy looks at the role Government can play and also how it can support local authorities, wider public services, the third sector and also the private sector. It also describes the important role that individuals can play in supporting each other in communities. The strategy has four priority areas: increasing opportunities for people to connect; improving the community infrastructure to support people to come together, including the areas of planning, housing and transport; cohesive and supportive communities; and build awareness and promote positive attitudes, which sets out how the Welsh Government will raise the profile of loneliness and social isolation and reduce stigma. Key commitments are listed under each priority area. The strategy will be supported by funding over three years to support community-based organisations to deliver and test innovative approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

Is co-living a good choice to support healthy, happy ageing at home? Summary and conclusions

BURGESS Gemma
2019

A summary of research carried out by the Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research to explore the extent to which co-living housing models might provide a good housing solution for people as they get older. Co-living is a form of housing that combines private living spaces with shared communal facilities, and explicitly seeks to promote social contact and build community. Models include cohousing communities where people live together in a community setting and homeshares, where an older person lives alongside a younger person. This research summary outlines some of the benefits and risks of co-living models.

Reaching out: guide to helping principal and local councils tackle loneliness

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LOCAL COUNCILS
2019

A practical guide to help principal authorities and local councils to work together to tackle loneliness. The guide outlines the current loneliness policy context and uses a range of case studies to demonstrate effective models working in practice. It highlights four ways in which loneliness can be tackled at a local level: finding ways to reach and understand the needs of those experiencing loneliness; providing services that directly improve the number and quality of relationships that people have; providing support such as transport and technology to help sustain connections; and providing the right environment by creating the right structures and conditions locally to support those affected by, or at risk of, loneliness. Case studies include schemes to tackle loneliness and isolation in rural communities; older people's lunch clubs; supporting socially isolated adults and using tablet computers and video conferencing; and a model of Enhanced Primary Care. The guide includes useful check lists, advice on how to measure and evaluate outputs, and links to additional resources.

Loneliness and the aging population: how businesses and governments can address a looming crisis

PALMARINI Nicola, et al
2017

This report explores the growing problem of loneliness in older people, current interventions, and ideas for future solutions. It draws on insights from interviews with a range of experts from six countries, including insight from medical professionals, social workers, academic researchers, technologists. The report focuses on why it is important for organisations understand loneliness and ageing, the triggers for loneliness, and why loneliness is so difficult to alleviate. It also looks at what is being done to alleviate loneliness in the ageing population today and potential future solutions. The report shows that for older people, loneliness is an emerging risk factor that has implications for personal, economic, and societal well-being. It identifies three areas for developing future solutions to address loneliness: detecting loneliness earlier and intervening earlier; helping people feel more engaged with others, and helping people rebuild social capital. It also outlines suggested actions for providers, business and employers. Short case studies of initiatives are included.

User requirements for technology to assist aging in place: qualitative study of older people and their informal support networks

ELERS Phoebe, et al
2018

BACKGROUND:Informal support is essential for enabling many older people to age in place. However, there is limited research examining the information needs of older adults' informal support networks and how these could be met through home monitoring and information and communication technologies. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate how technologies that connect older adults to their informal and formal support networks could assist ageing in place and enhance older adults' health and well-being. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 older adults and a total of 31 members of their self-identified informal support networks. They were asked questions about their information needs and how technology could support the older adults to age in place. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed. RESULTS: The analysis identified three overarching themes: (1) the social enablers theme, which outlined how timing, informal support networks, and safety concerns assist the older adults' uptake of technology, (2) the technology concerns theme, which outlined concerns about cost, usability, information security and privacy, and technology superseding face-to-face contact, and (3) the information desired theme, which outlined what information should be collected and transferred and who should make decisions about this. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults and their informal support networks may be receptive to technology that monitors older adults within the home if it enables ageing in place for longer. However, cost, privacy, security, and usability barriers would need to be considered and the system should be individualizable to older adults' changing needs. The user requirements identified from this study and described in this paper have informed the development of a technology that is currently being prototyped.

Going the extra step: a compendium of best practice in dementia care. Preventing unwanted isolation and loneliness for people with dementia living in housing with care

TWYFORD Katey, WELLS Wendy
2019

A collection of examples of extra care schemes and other housing related community services that support people with dementia to develop meaningful relationships, helping to reduce social isolation and loneliness. They include examples of personalised support that can be arranged for residents; examples of groups and social activities; and different organisational and community-based approaches that have been adopted. The examples range from informal arrangements supported by staff or other residents to formal service provision.

An evaluation of Rainbow Services community builder project: the Senior Safe and Social Programme

HAINES Sarah
2018

An evaluation of the Senior Safe and Social Project in Harlow, a project to reduce loneliness and social isolation in older people. The evaluation aims to provide an insight into why the model is working well, whether it could be applied to other demographics, how the approach compares with similar models, and the sustainability of the project. The project, based on an Asset Based Community Development (ABCD) model, provides weekly clubs and events in local communities, which are directed by older people themselves. The evaluation identified key factors identified that helped the model work. These included that social groups are design designed around the participants and give them control over what they do. Volunteers’ involvement in the project represents a reciprocal exchange, giving the volunteer the opportunity to socialise and sense of usefulness and connection in the local community. The evaluation suggests that the model could be applied to other locations and other age groups, such as young mothers and ‘empty nesters’. The report includes suggestions for the future development of the project.

Agents for change: an evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme

COMMUNITY COUNCIL FOR SOMERSET
2017

An evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme, which aims to reduce isolation and help connect excluded and vulnerable people with services that support them to improve their independence, health and wellbeing. It uses locally based staff who act as first point of contact for people needing information and support. The evaluation, undertaken jointly by South West Forum and Clarity CiC with support from University of Gloucestershire, included analysis of client data, interviews with clients and discussions with locally based staff. Analysis was carried out between October 2016 and February 2017. The results of the evaluation found that the Somerset Village Agents programme is highly regarded by clients, statutory agencies and voluntary and public organisations who have a connection with the programme. It is also helping the most isolated, lonely and vulnerable people in the community, especially older people and those with disabilities and/or long-term health conditions. Areas for potential improvement identified by the evaluation included expanding reach of the programme to reach more younger people and more work to build community capacity. A cost benefit analysis of the programme estimates that for the 21-month period reviewed the Village Agents programme cost £646,000 to deliver and generated £2.5 million in direct savings to the state and a further £2.74 million in wider social value. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Results 1 - 10 of 71

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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