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Results for 'social prescribing'

Results 1 - 10 of 53

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Wellbeing Service

H4ALL

Hillingdon H4All is a social prescription/wellbeing service that supports patients 65 and over to better manage long term health conditions and social isolation. The service operates as a Community Interest Company (CIC) and is a collaboration between five prominent local third sector charities namely Age UK Hillingdon, Disablement Association Hillingdon (DASH), Harlington Hospice, Hillingdon Carers and Hillingdon Mind and is commissioned by Hillingdon CCG. The service is an augmentation of the former Primary Care Navigator (PCN) project which was managed by Age UK Hillingdon and funded by Hillingdon CCG in 2014. The new service was established in April 2016 and used learning from the former PCN project to provide an enhanced service with the following features:

A life less lonely: the state of the art in interventions to reduce loneliness in people with mental health problems

MANN F., et al
2017

PURPOSE:: There is growing evidence of significant harmful effects of loneliness. Relatively little work has focused on how best to reduce loneliness in people with mental health problems. This study aims to present an overview of the current state of the art in loneliness interventions in people with mental health problems, identify relevant challenges, and highlight priorities for future research and implementation. METHODS: A scoping review of the published and grey literature was conducted, as well as discussions with relevant experts, to propose a broad classification system for types of interventions targeting loneliness. RESULTS: Interventions were categorised as 'direct', targeting loneliness and related concepts in social relationships, and 'indirect' broader approaches to well-being that may impact on loneliness. Four broad groups are described of direct interventions: changing cognitions; social skills training and psychoeducation; supported socialisation or having a 'socially-focused supporter'; and 'wider community approaches'. The most promising emerging evidence appears to be in 'changing cognitions', but, as yet, no approaches have a robust evidence base. Challenges include who is best placed to offer the intervention, how to test such complex interventions, and the stigma surrounding loneliness. CONCLUSIONS: Development of clearly defined loneliness interventions, high-quality trials of effectiveness, and identifying which approaches work best for whom is required. Promising future approaches may include wider community initiatives and social prescribing. It is important to place loneliness and social relationships high on the wider public mental health and research agenda.

Health at home: a new health and wellbeing model for social housing tenants

PEABODY
2018

Explores how housing support services and community-based health services can deliver effective services at lower cost; encourage self-care for the most vulnerable customers and reduce dependency on direct support; work with other agencies to ensure a coordinated response to the residents’ complex and multiple health needs. The report sets out the findings of a study which aimed to test a person-centred support model using a randomised control trial of 261 general needs residents aged over 50. The service model employed health navigators and volunteers to coach and connect residents with the relevant health, housing and community services they need. The study used to measurement tools to assess impact: the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) and Coaching for Activation (CFA). The study found that three months of intervention with those who started in PAM Level 2 was sufficient to move them up, on average, an entire PAM level. This increase in activation was sustained for at least nine months after the intervention ended, suggesting that participants gained the skills and confidence to effectively manage their health without further support after the initial intensive intervention. This is significant as one of the largest studies into cost reductions from PAM level changes in the United States found that patients who moved from Level 2 to Level 3 reduced their annual healthcare costs by 12%. Existing evidence also indicates that when people become more active in self-care, they benefit from better health outcomes, and fewer unplanned health admissions. The report concludes that there is a clear and compelling case for continuing to support integrated care and strengthen links between the health and housing agendas.

Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs

POULOS Roslyn G., et al
2019

Published evidence for the role of participatory art in supporting health and well‐being is growing. The Arts on Prescription model is one vehicle by which participatory art can be delivered. Much of the focus of Arts on Prescription has been on the provision of creative activities for people with mental health needs. This Arts on Prescription program, however, targeted community‐dwelling older people with a wide range of health and wellness needs. Older people were referred to the program by their healthcare practitioner. Professional artists led courses in visual arts, photography, dance and movement, drama, singing, or music. Classes were held weekly for 8–10 weeks, with six to eight participants per class, and culminated with a showing of work or a performance. Program evaluation involved pre‐ and postcourse questionnaires, and focus groups and individual interviews. Evaluation data on 127 participants aged 65 years and older were available for analysis. This study found that Arts on Prescription had a positive impact on participants. Quantitative findings revealed a statistically significant improvement in the Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well‐being Scale (WEMWBS) as well as a statistically significant increase in the level of self‐reported creativity and frequency of creative activities. Qualitative findings indicated that the program provided challenging artistic activities which created a sense of purpose and direction, enabled personal growth and achievement, and empowered participants, in a setting which fostered the development of meaningful relationships with others. This evaluation adds to the evidence base in support of Arts on Prescription by expanding the application of the model to older people with a diverse range of health and wellness needs.

Social prescribing and community-based support: summary guide

NHS ENGLAND
2019

A guide provides best practice advice for people and organisations leading local implementation of social prescribing. It describes what good social prescribing looks like and how it can improve outcomes for people, their families and carers, as well as achieving more value from the system. It considers what needs to be in place locally to implement social prescribing, commission local social prescribing connector schemes and enable agencies refer people with wider social needs to community-based support. It will enable collaborative working amongst local partners at a ‘place-based’ local level, to recognise the value of community groups and assets and to enable people to build or rebuild friendships, community connections and a sense of belonging, as well as accessing existing services. Includes a draft job description and person specification for a Social prescribing link worker.

What works in social prescribing?

CORDIS BRIGHT
2019

Based on a review of the literature, this evidence summary highlights the potential of social prescribing services to combat the root social causes of ill health and alleviate demand on healthcare services. The review provides a definition of social prescribing and outlines the key ingredients for successful social prescribing services. These key ingredients cover: funding, buy-in of health professionals, referral process, link workers, patient-centred care, collaborative working and integration between different sectors. The review also explores potential barriers to the widespread adoption of social prescribing services. It notes that robust evidence for social prescribing remains weak, with the majority of evaluations small in scale and poorly designed.

Understanding the effectiveness and mechanisms of a social prescribing service: a mixed method analysis

WOODALL James, et al
2018

Background: Evidence of the effectiveness of social prescribing is inconclusive causing commissioning challenges. This research focusses on a social prescribing scheme in Northern England which deploys ‘Wellbeing Coordinators’ who offer support to individuals, providing advice on local groups and services in their community. The research sought to understand the outcomes of the service and, in addition, the processes which supported delivery. Methods: Quantitative data was gathered from service users at the point they entered the service and also at the point they exited. Qualitative interviews were also undertaken with service users to gather further understanding of the service and any positive or negative outcomes achieved. In addition, a focus group discussion was also conducted with members of social prescribing staff to ascertain their perspectives of the service both from an operational and strategic perspective. Results: In total, 342 participants provided complete wellbeing data at baseline and post stage and 26 semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out. Improvements in participants’ well-being, and perceived levels of health and social connectedness as well as reductions in anxiety was demonstrated. In many cases, the social prescribing service had enabled individuals to have a more positive and optimistic view of their life often through offering opportunities to engage in a range of hobbies and activities in the local community. The data on reductions in future access to primary care was inconclusive. Some evidence was found to show that men may have greater benefit from social prescribing than women. Some of the processes which increased the likelihood of success on the social prescribing scheme included the sustained and flexible relationship between the service user and the Wellbeing Coordinator and a strong and vibrant voluntary and community sector. Conclusions: Social prescribing has the potential to address the health and social needs of individuals and communities. This research has shown a range of positive outcomes as a result of service users engaging with the service. Social prescribing should be conceptualised as one way to support primary care and tackle unmet needs.

A connected society. A strategy for tackling loneliness: laying the foundations for change

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2018

This strategy builds on the work of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness and sets out the government's approach to tackling loneliness in England. The strategy highlights the role that everyone can play in tackling loneliness, including government, communities and the individual. The government's work on loneliness is guided by three overarching goals: building the evidence base, embedding loneliness as a consideration across government policy, and building a national conversation on loneliness, to raise awareness of its impacts and to help tackle stigma. Chapter one provides a summary of the existing evidence base on loneliness, including its impacts and causes. The following three chapters set out government commitments and partnerships in three areas seen as crucial to build a connected society. These are: organisations and services - how government, working with local authorities, health bodies, businesses and the voluntary sector will introduce a range of new initiatives that enable the everyday services we use to connect those at risk of loneliness to support; community infrastructure – such as accessing community space, transport and well designed housing; and building a culture that encourages strong social relationships – including tackling stigma surrounding loneliness and supporting community groups. Chapter five sets out how government will take this agenda forward and sets out a commitment from the Loneliness Action Group to continue its work until at least the end of 2019. The document highlights examples from practice throughout.

Community Webs: final evaluation report

BROWN C., et al
2018

Evaluation of Community Webs, a pilot project funded by Bristol Ageing Better (BAB) and Better Care Bristol (BCB), a social prescribing service which enables GP patients to access social activities and non-medical support services available in their local community. The evaluation of used both qualitative and quantitative methods to understand the process of delivery, short-term outcomes for clients and key costs linked to the project. The evaluation findings include client profiles and patterns of service use, patient experience of the linkworker service, GP and practice staff perceptions of the service, and links between service participation and client outcomes. The main reasons for practitioners making referrals were social isolation, low confidence and self-esteem and practical support needs (including welfare benefits, housing and form filling). The results suggest that Community Webs is beneficial for patients and GPs, in particular through its person-centred methods which have resulted in significant improvements to patients’ health and wellbeing. Patients have been provided with the right information to help them to access social, emotional and practical support, and have been able to make positive choices regarding their broader health and wellbeing needs. GP’s and practice staff have demonstrated trust in the voluntary and community sector, and in social prescribing in particular, by continuing to refer their patients into the service. The report also highlights that there is no ‘one size fits all’ in relation to social prescribing services and the value of exploring both the individual and community ‘assets’. Learning and recommendations are included.

Results 1 - 10 of 53

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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