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Results for 'strengths-based approach'

Results 1 - 10 of 24

Community Team Plus

Stoke on Trent City Council

Community Team Plus involves multidisciplinary health and care teams supporting people across six Stoke on Trent localities to 'help me to help myself to live well'. They are tasked with being accessible, creative, resourceful and helpful.

Care and Health Improvement programme: efficiency project


This report provides practice examples from ten councils who took part in the Care and Health Improvement Programme during 2016/17. It describes the innovative approaches they took to achieve greater efficiencies from their adult social care budgets and draws conclusions as to what other councils might learn from them. The examples cover three main areas: managing demand for social care by offering residents a different type of service; more effectively using the capacity in communities to help find new care solutions; and working closer with partners in the NHS to reduce pressures in the care and health system. They highlight the importance of councils dealing with people effectively at their first point of contact; the benefits of using strength-based approaches; that developing social enterprises can be a cost effective way of meeting demand and reducing shortage of supply; and the potential of collaboration between councils to reduce costs and demand for services. The 10 councils are: Bristol City Council, Poole Borough Council, Swindon and Wiltshire Councils; Norfolk County Council; Waltham Forest Council; Somerset Council; Newcastle City Council; Nottingham City Council; and Nottinghamshire County Council.

Mixing matters: how shared sites can bring older and younger people together and unite Brexit Britain


Sets out why increasing connections between generations is key to the health, wellbeing and future of individuals, communities and the country. While Britain has become more age segregated in recent decades, this paper demonstrates there is a growing movement to tackle ‘age apartheid’. The paper focuses on how older and younger people can come together through ‘shared sites’ with many inspiring and practical examples that could be replicated across the UK. Four specific themes are explored: shared care and play; shared housing and living; shared learning and work; and shared community spaces and activities. The paper sets out an ambition to develop 500 shared sites by 2022, arguing that with some 75,000 care homes, nurseries and schools in the UK, there is massive scope for the shared sites challenge to achieve much more.

Promoting asset based approaches for health and wellbeing: exploring a theory of change and challenges in evaluation


This project explores two key areas that are critical for moving to a more systematised approach to asset based action for health. It builds on the report ‘Head, hand and heart’, from the Health Foundation, to explore further the develop a Theory of Change for asset based approaches aligned to an asset model for health and also looks at ways of evaluating and measuring the benefits and impact of asset based approaches. Drawing on the findings from site visits, interviews and a think piece event, this report presents a new Theory of Change for asset-based working. A rapid review of published and grey literature was also conducted to map and categorise evaluate approaches and measures used in asset-based programmes. The map of literature showed that a variety of methodologies and evaluation strategies are used in asset-based practice. The report summarises the approaches across the seven broad clusters of: Asset Based Community Development; Asset Mapping; Community-based evaluation; Conceptual frameworks for measurement; Resilience; Salutogenesis; and Other. The report suggests that a high level Theory of Change that incorporates an orientation phase provides an opportunity to set out the purpose and rationale of asset based activity. This can also enable measurement and evaluation to be better defined and managed, and help local actors in articulating the benefits (or not) of asset based approaches for health.

The Kirklees Do Your Thing project


An evaluation of the Kirklees Do Your Thing project, delivered by Community Catalysts, to develop new innovative community-based activities for individuals with learning disabilities and/or autism. The two-year project, which employed a local catalyst, undertook a thorough community scoping exercise to identify organisations and people in Kirklees who might add value to the project; met people with a learning disability and/or autism interested in running an activity (called group leaders) and their supporters; supported group leaders to identify and connect with potential group members; identified community venues which could be used at no or little cost by group leaders to run their activities and formed strong working links with their managers; captured the journeys of the group leaders and showcased the outcomes of their work throughout the life of the project; established and strengthened a circle of formal and informal supports around each group leader to ensure the sustainability of their activity as the project came to end; and developed a set of ‘top tips’ for commissioners and other organisations keen to help other people with disabilities use their talents and interests to set up groups and make a contribution. The evaluation finds that with the right kind of help and support people with learning disabilities and/or autism will readily use their often-unappreciated gifts and talents to set up groups and activities that benefit other people. The project has also successfully challenged negative perceptions of people with learning disabilities and/or autism, helping professionals and families to recognise their strengths and gifts and the contribution they can make with the right kind of support. Key learning points include: it takes time to embed a project like this which brings radically new thinking into an area; some people prefer to work alone, and peer support groups may not work for everybody; establish the boundaries and be clear about the types of support that potential group leaders could or could not expect from the project; focus on the people who are really motivated; and work at people’s own pace.

Building bridges to a good life: a review of asset based, person centred approaches and people with learning disabilities in Scotland


This review explores the potential to join up thinking on increased choice and control for people with learning disabilities and the principles of asset based working. Commissioned by the Scottish Commission for Learning Disability, it considers the efficacy of asset based approaches for people with learning disabilities, looks at evidence of the impact these approaches can have on people’s lives and also identifies examples of good practice in Scotland. The review draws on the results of a literature review; interviews with key informants involved in asset based working and learning disability services; and a mapping of projects using asset based principles with people with learning disabilities across Scotland. The results suggest that there are is reason why the focus of assets work cannot be broadened to include opportunities for people with learning disabilities. However it suggests that asset based approaches should be seen in the context of efforts to advance the personalisation and social integration agendas, and that if that they need to fit alongside services, support systems and initiatives. Examples included in the review illustrate how services can add to the assets of individuals and communities, provided they are willing and committed to relating to people and doing things differently. Factors identified that facilitate asset based approaches with people with learning disabilities, include: addressing wider inequalities and stigma; ensuring people with learning disabilities are active participants in place based community development; and tackling attitudinal barriers and established ways of doing things.

Developing an asset based approach within a learning community: using end of life care as an example


The aim of the report is to be a practical guide to help extend the asset based approach already existing in end of life care into a learning and development model. Part one forms a short summary of the findings of a project that looked at ways to build a more sustainable asset based approach to workforce development and provides detail on what an asset based approach can look like and what factors need to be in place, incorporating lessons learnt, case studies and tips from those who have already explored the approach. It also contains examples of innovative resources that can be used to support learning facilitators. Part two looks at the project brief from which the practical guide originated, the methodology and the underpinning literature. It provides additional case studies and further detail on the work of Dying Matters and Dementia Friends, both networks bringing together communities to support end of life care raising awareness activities, which also offer valuable opportunities for workforce learning and development.

Flipping the narrative: essays on transformation from the sector's boldest voices


A compilation of 16 essays from innovative leaders in the charitable sector on how they are thinking about, and putting into action, new ways of achieving social change for the causes and beneficiaries their organisations. It includes contributions from leaders in national charities and smaller innovative organisations based in communities. The essays cover four key themes: strategy and governance – how organisational and governance change can support charities to deliver greater impact; the sector’s relationship with the public – the importance of trust and how charities can develop trust with the public; the sector’s relationship with the state – how to reframe interactions with the state and methods for forming more productive relationships, building on the strengths of the voluntary sector and their ability to understand the challenges of those accessing public services; and new networks and resources – building collaborations with new partners from different sectors and maximising the potential of new resources, such as digital technology and the voices and strengths of the communities they exist to serve.

Place-based approaches to joint planning, resourcing and delivery: an overview of current practice in Scotland

BACZYK Monika, et al

Sets out the current landscape of place-based approaches to joint planning, resourcing and delivery across Scotland’s local authority areas. The report captures current place-based activities within 27 local authority areas and includes a synthesis of published materials on the subject. As well as undertaking a review of the literature on place-based approaches to service delivery in the UK, the Improvement Service conducted interviews with local authority areas to find out more about local approaches. Whilst there is evidence of a wide variety of approaches being undertaken, the research also highlights a range of common principles that feature across most areas. The study found that the majority of place-based approaches are adopting a holistic approach, focused on reducing inequalities and supporting people, families and communities to improve their life outcomes in the round. Others are focusing on a specific theme, such as family support, health inequalities, physical regeneration and access to services. The report includes a practical checklist that summarises key issues that partnerships may wish to consider, either when embarking upon a new place-based initiative or when reviewing existing activities.

The community mapping toolkit: a guide to community asset mapping for community groups and local organisations


A toolkit to help community groups to map the individual, community and institutional assets in their local area. A community asset mapping can help to develop a picture of the community to shows its capacity and potential. This information can be used to gain a better understanding of community priorities and create neighbourhood action plans, which make the best use of the local assets. This toolkit explains the process behind asset mapping, looks at how to carry out a Community Street Audit, provides advice on making asset mapping meaningful and ensuring it leads to constructive action, and on involving different sections of the community - including community residents, elected councillors and representatives from local services. Finally it looks at the tools you may need, and how to keep community and local agencies informed of any action plans arising from the asset mapping.

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