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Results for 'telecare'

Results 11 - 20 of 21

Coping with change: frail bodies and daily activities in later life: AKTIVE working paper 4

FRY Gary
2014

This paper explores responses to changes arising from bodily frailty observed among older people participating in the AKTIVE study and discussed with them during research visits. Focusing on older people living at home with different types of frailty, the AKTIVE project aimed both to enhance understanding of how they (and those supporting them) accessed, engaged with and used the telecare equipment supplied to them, and to explore the consequences for them of doing so. This paper identifies which daily activities were affected in older age and the strategies older people drew upon to cope. The paper also explores how telecare was combined with other support mechanisms to help older people maintain both practical and recreational daily activities. Throughout, there is discussion about limitations in how care support was sometimes provided, including how telecare was acquired and used by older people and/or those caring for or supporting them, and how far these problems might be overcome by more proactive implementation.

Impact assessment toolkit: commissioning assistive technologies

SKILLS FOR CARE
2014

This online tool outlines the key steps of planning and implementing the impact assessment of assisted living technologies (ALT) and assistive living services (ALT). It includes practical tips, links to other sources of guidance and areas to discuss with partners. The toolkit covers designing an evaluation framework; assigning impact measures; establishing a sample of people to assess impact; establishing unit costs; developing data capture research tools; measuring return on investment; quality control; and using the findings to inform future delivery. The tool should be used in conjunction with two accompanying reports: 'Supporting commissioners of assisted living Services: stage 1: research report' and 'Commissioning assisted living technologies: guidance'.

Commissioning assisted living technologies: guidance

SKILLS FOR CARE
2014

The practice guidance has been produced to support people who have the responsibility for commissioning assisted living technology (ALT) and assisted living services (ALS). These services include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. The guide looks at general principles, such as establishing a vision and defining the strategy; carrying out a local needs assessment; service specification and procurement; and developing systems to measure performance and impact. Although primarily developed for commissioners based in social care settings, it may also be useful for those working across housing or health services. An accompanying research report and toolkit have also been produced.

Telecare and older people's social relations: AKTIVE working paper 3

KOIVUNEN Emma-Reetta
2014

This paper focuses on the social relationships in the everyday lives of participants in the AKTIVE study and considers how telecare fits into these. Focusing on older people living at home with different types of frailty, the AKTIVE project aimed both to enhance understanding of how they (and those supporting them) accessed, engaged with and used the telecare equipment supplied to them, and to explore the consequences for them of doing so. This paper examines types of relationships and how these change, with a focus on being cared for and on the loneliness which many participants experienced. After discussing these aspects, the paper explores how telecare fitted into these relationships, assesses the extent to which social relations support or hinder telecare use, and discusses research participants’ experiences of this. The paper addresses three of the AKTIVE project’s research questions, adding to knowledge of: the characteristics of older people who use telecare and the contexts in which they do so; how telecare is used and affects those involved; and barriers to the adoption of telecare. In examining older people’s social relationships and how telecare fits into and affects these, the paper builds on sociological research on the use of technology, much of which has focused on information and communication technologies (ICTs). The paper explores new data collected through Everyday Life Analysis (ELA), a methodology using ethnographic observations and interviews with older people over a period of six to nine months. Research participants were supported to create maps of their social relations to help identify the people who supported them, who were also interviewed or observed wherever possible.

Supporting commissioners of assisted living services: stage 1: research report

CONSILIUM
2014

This report presents the findings of research to examine the skills and knowledge that are unique to those commissioning assisted living technologies (ALT). These technologies include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. They are referred to collectively as assistive living services (ALS). The research methodology included desk based review of the evidence and consultation with a range of local authority commissioners in England. The report presents a summary of different commissioning models used, provides examples of good practice and what is working well, areas that need improvement and challenges facing commissioners. It also discusses workforce development issues and measuring impact.

Can online innovations enhance social care? Exploring the challenges of using digital technology to develop new models of support for older people

AYRES Shirley
2013

Explores how the care sector can take advantage of the power and potential of digital technology and social networks to develop new models of support for older people. The effective use of digital technologies – based around the internet, computers, mobile phones, social networks, telecare and telehealth – are critical in enabling people to live more independent and fulfilling lives, irrespective of their health and care needs. This is especially true as the demand for care services increases. The paper, using a range of good practice examples, highlights the role of digital technology in alleviating social isolation, enabling access to information and knowledge and in supporting the lives and work of many carers around the UK. The paper calls for a better shared understanding of innovations in this sector, a more co-ordinated and coherent approach to enable carers and care seekers to easily access online information and support, greater shared learning, collaboration and partnerships, and the promotion of events that showcase digital technology innovations in care which could be adopted by local authorities, the NHS and housing providers, as well as being purchased by people funding their own support needs.

Digital reablement: a personalised service to reduce admissions and readmissions to hospitals and nursing homes

DOUGHTY Kevin, MULVIHILL Patrick
2013

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to consider the importance of digital healthcare through telecare and portable assistive devices in supporting the reengineering of healthcare to deal with the needs of an older and more vulnerable population wishing to remain in their own homes. Design/methodology/approach: It supports the importance of the assessment process to identify hazards associated with independent living, and the possible consequences of accidents. By measuring and prioritising the risks, appropriate management strategies may be introduced to provide a safer home environment. Findings: A process for assessing and managing these risks has been developed. This can be applied to a wide range of different cases and yields solutions that can support independence. Research limitations/implications: The developed digital reablement process can be used to provide vulnerable people with a robust form of risk management. Practical implications: If telecare services follow the process described in this paper then they will improve the outcomes for their users. Originality/value: The process described in this paper is the first attempt to produce a robust assessment process for introducing telecare services in a reablement context.

How psychological telehealth can alleviate society's mental health burden: a literature review

PERLE Jonathan G., NIERENBERG Barry
2013

The authors believe that with the current and growing prevalence of mental illness a major shift and expansion of clinical practice must occur to overcome the mental health burden and facilitate positive change. This article offers an outline of, and case for, incorporating telehealth in mental health practice. For the purposes of this review, telehealth specifically refers to synchronous web camera-based interventions. Novel options, including mHealth (mobile) and the use of computer tablets, are discussed. The implications for practice including training are considered, as well as potential future directions for the field. It is concluded that the available data supports telehealth as an effective mode for the treatment of clients who are unable to pursue mental health services as they are available. It appears that with careful planning, telehealth systems can significantly impact the quality, timeliness, and availability of services in almost any mental health care system. The authors emphasise that the goal is not to substitute for a “real” person but to integrate telehealth into overall provision. In some cases a consistent face-to-face interaction may be the best care but this may not always be possible. The authors conclude by emphasising the importance of appropriate training for the mental health professionals if telehealth is to be effectively.

AT and telecare to manage fire risks in the homes of older and vulnerable people

DOUGHTY Kevin, ORTON Mike
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities where technology interventions could help manage the risks associated with fire and explosions in homes of people who are older or who are vulnerable through other causes such as mental health problems or a history of substance abuse. Design/methodology/approach: The approach focused on reviewing the latest available statistics in order to identify the major causes and rooms in which fire accidents occurred. Findings: The authors found that the number of incidents and fatalities continues to decrease as a result of preventive measures such as a greater use of smoke detectors, but that there remained issues with cooking safety. New products for limiting damage and managing risks are available which could have a positive impact. Research limitations/implications: The paper concludes that the challenges are making both professionals and the public aware of the available technologies and of introducing them following appropriate assessment of needs and risks. Practical implications: Greater resources need to be offered for training of the public and of health and safety professionals. Further funding may be needed to implement the introduction of new technology. Originality/value: This is the most up-to-date review of fire control measures employing assistive technology and telecare for domestic properties and will be of value to community health teams, adults care organisations, housing associations and other public bodies.

Transforming integrated care – using telecare as a catalyst for change

THOMPSON Frances
2012

This article discusses how to successfully mainstream telecare to transform service delivery and provide more preventative and personalised care for people of all ages and abilities. Based on experiences from the city of Wakefield, a metropolitan district of West Yorkshire, England, the article explores the use of technology and support systems, such as door sensors, smoke detectors or flood sensors, to assist vulnerable people by improving and improving well-being and maintaining independence, enabling individuals to live safely and securely at home for as long as possible. Alongside the management of adults and older people, telecare has also had a positive impact on the support of people with learning disabilities. The article concludes that to successfully integrate and mainstream telecare, there needs to be adequate training and assessment for all staff involved in the implementation in order to deliver a sustainable and deliverable telecare service. Overall, the cost efficiencies were crucial when considering the future of telecare and, with significant cost savings made over a relatively short period, the potential for future investments was a significant factor for the continuing delivery of services.

Results 11 - 20 of 21

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