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Results for 'television'

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Social, economic and health impacts of WaveLength's work with loneliness and isolation

IRVINE Annie
2015

The findings of a small qualitative research to understand the ways media technology such as radio, TV and tablet computers can contribute to reducing loneliness and social isolation among vulnerable groups. Specifically, the research aimed to understand what differences the technologies provided by the charity WaveLength make in different areas of people’s lives, including emotional, social, economic and health. The study carried out interviews with 11 organisations and 14 individual beneficiaries who had received equipment from WaveLength. A further 16 people took part in face-to-face group discussions with 16 participants. The positive impacts of media technology described by participants fell into three broad categories: alleviating the subjective experience of loneliness and associated negative emotions; reducing social isolation by bringing people into ‘real world’ contact with others; and a broad range of other benefits in areas including: information and interest emotional wellbeing and mental health; physical health; and economic and educational impacts. The findings show that media technology could have positive impacts both in alleviating the negative subjective experience of loneliness at times when people were physically alone and also in reducing more objective social isolation by bringing individuals into greater contact with others.

Everyday technology fighting loneliness

WAVELENGTH, UNIVERSITY OF YORK
2019

Summary findings from research co-produced by the University of York and the charity Wavelength, which suggests that people feel less lonely when they have access to everyday technology such as a radio, television or tablet. The research looked at data collected from 445 people over two years. It found that people who received technology saw a statistically significant reduction in emotional and social loneliness. It also found that they rated their health more positively after being given new technology. The study participants had an average age of 44 and over half had been homeless and experienced poor mental health. The report calls on policy makers to make funding available so that vulnerable people can purchase everyday technology and for free access to a minimum standard of broadband in order to connect greater numbers of people via smart televisions and tablet computers.

Results 1 - 2 of 2

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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