#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'therapeutic horticulture'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: a mixed-methods study

HALL Jodi, et al
2018

Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past.

Exposure to nature gardens has time-dependent associations with mood improvements for people with mid- and late-stage dementia

WHITE Piran CL., et al
2018

Exposure to green space and nature has a potential role to play in the care of people with dementia, with possible benefits including improved mood and slower disease progression. In this observational study at a dementia care facility in the UK, we used carer-assessed measures to evaluate change in mood of residents with mid- to late-stage dementia following exposure to a nature garden. We found that exposure to nature was associated with a beneficial change in patient mood. There was a non-linear relationship between time spent outdoors and mood outcome. Improvements in patient mood were associated with relatively short duration exposures to nature, and no additional measureable increases in mood were found with exposures beyond 80–90 minutes duration. Whilst further investigation is required before causality can be determined, these results raise important questions for policy about the integration of outdoor space into the design of dementia care facilities and programmes.

Good practice in social prescribing for mental health: the role of nature-based interventions

BRAGG R., LECK C.
2017

Building on early findings from Natural England, this research the value of nature-based or green care interventions within social prescribing services for people with mental health problems and highlights good practice in social prescribing services for commissioners. It draws on the results of an evidence review and an event for health and social care professionals involved with social prescribing in Leeds. The report looks at definitions of green care, models of social prescribing, examples of good practice, suggestions for scaling up nature-based interventions with social prescribing, and evidence of effectiveness and cost effectiveness. The review identified a number of different social prescribing models currently operating in England. The case studies included in the report suggest that good practice in social prescribing depends on good partnerships, high levels of cooperation and joint ownership between a wide range of individuals, groups and organisations with very different organisational cultures. Barriers to the sustainability and scaling up of social prescribing included the lack of a consistent referral mechanism and lack of direct funding for the social prescription element delivered by third sector providers. The report identifies key areas for future action

A review of nature-based interventions for mental health care

NATURAL ENGLAND
2016

This study examines the benefits, commonality and outcomes of three green care approaches, to help raise awareness, understanding and value placed on these services by mental health commissioners, thereby helping to increase the number of projects commissioned. Although the three approaches of social and therapeutic horticulture (STH), care farming and environmental conservation as an intervention are contextually different, in practice the approaches often feature similar activities and have a similar ethos. The paper examines their scale across the UK and the current commissioning routes for green care to help inform potential new nature-based service providers. An estimated 8,400 people with mental health problems receive STH services per week and at least 5,865 service users on 173 care farms receive services for mental ill-health per week. Available anecdotal evidence suggests there is growing interest and demand for these services though overall referrals from clinical commissioning groups or from GPs for green care services remains patchy and relatively uncommon. As a consequence there is significant unused capacity across all three green care services. This research seeks to explore these issues and set out the steps required to enable a greater number of nature-based interventions to be commissioned in mental health care.

Results 1 - 4 of 4

#EXCLUDE#
News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#