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Results for 'unmet need'

Results 1 - 3 of 3

Understanding the effectiveness and mechanisms of a social prescribing service: a mixed method analysis

WOODALL James, et al
2018

Background: Evidence of the effectiveness of social prescribing is inconclusive causing commissioning challenges. This research focusses on a social prescribing scheme in Northern England which deploys ‘Wellbeing Coordinators’ who offer support to individuals, providing advice on local groups and services in their community. The research sought to understand the outcomes of the service and, in addition, the processes which supported delivery. Methods: Quantitative data was gathered from service users at the point they entered the service and also at the point they exited. Qualitative interviews were also undertaken with service users to gather further understanding of the service and any positive or negative outcomes achieved. In addition, a focus group discussion was also conducted with members of social prescribing staff to ascertain their perspectives of the service both from an operational and strategic perspective. Results: In total, 342 participants provided complete wellbeing data at baseline and post stage and 26 semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out. Improvements in participants’ well-being, and perceived levels of health and social connectedness as well as reductions in anxiety was demonstrated. In many cases, the social prescribing service had enabled individuals to have a more positive and optimistic view of their life often through offering opportunities to engage in a range of hobbies and activities in the local community. The data on reductions in future access to primary care was inconclusive. Some evidence was found to show that men may have greater benefit from social prescribing than women. Some of the processes which increased the likelihood of success on the social prescribing scheme included the sustained and flexible relationship between the service user and the Wellbeing Coordinator and a strong and vibrant voluntary and community sector. Conclusions: Social prescribing has the potential to address the health and social needs of individuals and communities. This research has shown a range of positive outcomes as a result of service users engaging with the service. Social prescribing should be conceptualised as one way to support primary care and tackle unmet needs.

The obstacle course: overcoming the barriers to a better later life

CHRISTIE Amelia, McDOWELL Adrian
2017

This report looks at some of the issues older people and their families face in accessing the services and support they need to remain independent and live healthy, enjoyable lives. The report draws on an analysis of calls received to the Independent Age advice Helpline in 2016 and findings from other charities, think tanks and government reports. It focuses on four topic areas: help with serious health needs; understanding social care and the barriers to accessing support when they need personal care and practical help, securing a decent income and access to benefits; and staying in control which looks at some of the major life changes older people can experience, in relation to their finances and housing. For each topic area, the report examines the most common issues older people face and includes individual stories older people and their family members which show the difference early intervention can make, as well as where things are going wrong. It also highlights emerging issues which may get worse in the future, if not addressed. The report concludes that the country is still not responding well enough for a rapidly ageing population. It offers some recommendations to improve health, care and social security services for older people.

Complex needs survey: informing the development of a community recovery and rehabilitation team

BEKAS Stavros
2013

This study aimed to inform the development of a new, recovery-oriented rehabilitation service, identify local needs and create a pathway for appropriate referrals, accelerating the build up of case-load. 1353 secondary service users subject to Care Programme Approach under four local community teams, an assertive outreach team and an early interventions service were surveyed using a purpose-made needs assessment and case identification questionnaire. Significant unmet need for rehabilitation and recovery-oriented interventions was found. The results were used to invite referrals, create a case-load of 150 and allocate the appropriate resources for the new team. The results highlight the untapped recovery potential among users of mainstream secondary mental health services and support investment in rehabilitation at a time of resource restriction. This work also supports a similar, evidence-based approach to targeting appropriate referrals during the development and the early stages of rehabilitation services.

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