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Results for 'user views'

Results 1 - 10 of 40

Shared Lives intermediate care: evaluation report

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2019

An evaluation of Shared Lives intermediate care, a pilot programme to develop Shared Lives as a ‘home from hospital’ service for older people. The evaluation looks at the impact of the programme for people who are ready to leave hospital, but unable to return home. It draws on qualitative data from people in Shared Lives arrangements, Shared Lives carers, health and social care professionals, as well as data gathered from the seven pilot sites. The findings show that by the end of the Shared Lives Intermediate Care Pilot programme, which ran from October 2016-April 2019, there had been 31 home from hospital referrals into a Shared Lives arrangement. This included people with learning disability, mental health problems and physical disability. Although referrals were low, overall the evaluation demonstrate the potential benefits of Shared Lives Intermediate Care for the health outcomes of people with multiple or complex needs, in particular, people with mental health issues. Key challenges experienced by the pilots included getting health professionals to trust the Shared Lives model and make referrals. There were also capacity and resource issues, with two sites withdrawing from the pilots. The report makes recommendations for Shared Lives Schemes and services.

North London Cares and South London Cares evaluation: final report

HITCHIN John, PETIE Olivia, NORRLANDER Amanda
2019

An evaluation Love Your Neighbour and Social Clubs, two programmes to reduce loneliness, improve intergenerational relationships and create a greater sense of community. The programmes, which aimed to bring together people of different generations to spend time together, were delivered across the London based charities North London Cares and South London Cares as part of The Cares Family’s model. The Social clubs programme brings together groups of younger and older neighbours to get involved in activities and socialise; and Love Your Neighbour focuses on one-to-one friendships between older and younger neighbours. The evaluation examines the outcomes for young and older neighbours, the strengths and weaknesses of the model, and highlights the challenges of evaluating community-based models. The evaluation found that overall, The Cares Family model is contributing to positive outcomes in four areas: reduced loneliness and isolation, particularly for older neighbours; improved understanding across the generations; a sense of belonging; and an increased connection to self.

Impact of a dementia-specific program of equine-assisted activities: providers’ perspectives

FIELDS Beth, WOOD Wendy, LASSELL Rebecca
2019

Purpose: Establishing acceptability of complex interventions to stakeholders is vital in early scientific development. The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the acceptability of a program of equine-assisted activities (EAAP) for people with dementia by elucidating programmatic practices needed to enhance their safety and quality of life (QoL) from the perspectives of service providers. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews with five providers were analyzed using a basic qualitative approach. Findings: Providers perceived the EAAP as acceptable and revealed potential mechanisms of change supporting well-being, including aspects related to the physical and social environment and person with dementia. Linkages identified among the EAAP and its physical and social context support its complexity. Providers explicated program practices that promoted safety and QoL, such as implementing staff trainings and tailoring activities to each person’s preferences and needs. These practices aligned with best dementia care approaches, underscoring that the EAAP is a promising complex intervention that merits further scientific development. Originality/value: This work is novel and adds to the literature by illuminating the role of a community-based, animal-assisted program for enhancing the QoL of older adults with dementia residing in institutional care facilities.

User requirements for technology to assist aging in place: qualitative study of older people and their informal support networks

ELERS Phoebe, et al
2018

BACKGROUND:Informal support is essential for enabling many older people to age in place. However, there is limited research examining the information needs of older adults' informal support networks and how these could be met through home monitoring and information and communication technologies. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate how technologies that connect older adults to their informal and formal support networks could assist ageing in place and enhance older adults' health and well-being. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 older adults and a total of 31 members of their self-identified informal support networks. They were asked questions about their information needs and how technology could support the older adults to age in place. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed. RESULTS: The analysis identified three overarching themes: (1) the social enablers theme, which outlined how timing, informal support networks, and safety concerns assist the older adults' uptake of technology, (2) the technology concerns theme, which outlined concerns about cost, usability, information security and privacy, and technology superseding face-to-face contact, and (3) the information desired theme, which outlined what information should be collected and transferred and who should make decisions about this. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults and their informal support networks may be receptive to technology that monitors older adults within the home if it enables ageing in place for longer. However, cost, privacy, security, and usability barriers would need to be considered and the system should be individualizable to older adults' changing needs. The user requirements identified from this study and described in this paper have informed the development of a technology that is currently being prototyped.

Acceptance and use of innovative assistive technologies among people with cognitive impairment and their caregivers: a systematic review

THORDARDOTTIR Bjorg, et al
2019

Cognitive impairments (CI), associated with the consequences of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, are increasingly prevalent among older adults, leading to deterioration in self-care, mobility, and interpersonal relationships among them. Innovative Assistive Technologies (IAT) such as electronic reminders and surveillance systems are considered as increasingly important tools to facilitate independence among this population and their caregivers. The aim of this study is to synthesise knowledge on facilitators and barriers related to acceptance of and use of IAT among people with CI and their caregivers. This systematic review includes original papers with quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods design. Relevant peer-reviewed articles published in English between 2007 and 2017 were retrieved in the following databases: CINAHL; PubMed; Inspec; and PsycINFO. The Mixed Method Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used for quality assessment. We retrieved thirty studies, including in total 1655 participants from Europe, USA/Canada, Australia, and Asia, enrolled in their homes, care-residences, day-care centres, or Living Labs. Two-thirds of the studies tested technologies integrating home sensors and wearable devices for care and monitoring CI symptoms. Main facilitators for acceptance and adherence to IAT were familiarity with and motivation to use technologies, immediate perception of effectiveness (e.g., increase in safety perceptions), and low technical demands. Barriers identified included older age, low maturity of the IAT, little experience with technologies in general, lack of personalization, and support. More than 2/3 of the studies met 80% of the quality criteria of the MMAT. Low acceptance and use of IAT both independently and with caregivers remains a significant concern. More knowledge on facilitators and barriers to use of IAT among clients of health care and social services is crucial for the successful implementation of innovative programmes aiming to leverage innovative technologies for the independence of older people with CI.

How do “robopets” impact the health and well‐being of residents in care homes? A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative evidence

ABBOTT Rebecca, et al
2019

BACKGROUND: Robopets are small animal-like robots which have the appearance and behavioural characteristics of pets. OBJECTIVE(S): To bring together the evidence of the experiences of staff, residents and family members of interacting with robopets and the effects of robopets on the health and well-being of older people living in care homes. DESIGN: Systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research. DATA SOURCES: This study searched 13 electronic databases from inception to July 2018 and undertook forward and backward citation chasing. METHOD(S): Eligible studies reported the views and experiences of robopets from residents, family members and staff (qualitative studies using recognised methods of qualitative data collection and analysis) and the effects of robopets on the health and well-being of care home residents (randomised controlled trials, randomised crossover trials and cluster randomised trials). Study selection was undertaken independently by two reviewers. This study used the Wallace criteria and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool to assess the quality of the evidence. This study developed a logic model with stakeholders and used this as a framework to guide data extraction and synthesis. Where appropriate, meta-analysis were used to combine effect estimates from quantitative studies. RESULT(S): Nineteen studies (10 qualitative, 2 mixed methods and 7 randomised trials) met the inclusion criteria. Interactions with robopets were described as having a positive impact on aspects of well-being including loneliness, depression and quality of life by residents and staff, although there was no corresponding statistically significant evidence from meta-analysis for these outcomes. Meta-analysis showed evidence of a reduction in agitation with the robopet "Paro" compared to control (-0.32 [95% CI -0.61 to -0.04, p = 0.03]). Not everyone had a positive experience of robopets. CONCLUSION(S): Engagement with robopets appears to have beneficial effects on the health and well-being of older adults living in care homes, but not all chose to engage. Whether the benefits can be sustained are yet to be investigated. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Robopets have the potential to benefit people living in care homes, through increasing engagement and interaction. With the robopet acting as a catalyst, this engagement and interaction may afford comfort and help reduce agitation and loneliness.

Ringing the changes: the role of telephone communication in a helpline and befriending service targeting loneliness in older people

PRESTON Claire, MOORE Stephen
2019

The drive to deliver services addressing loneliness in older people by telephone and online makes it increasingly relevant to consider how the mode of communication affects the way people interact with services and the capacity of services to meet their needs. This paper is based on the qualitative strand of a larger mixed-methods study of a national phoneline tackling loneliness in older people in the United Kingdom. The research comprised thematic analysis of four focus groups with staff and 42 semi-structured interviews with callers. It explored the associations between telephone-delivery, how individuals used the services and how the services were able to respond. To understand these associations, it was useful to identify some constituent characteristics of telephone communication in this context: namely its availability, reach and non-visual nature. This enabled various insights and comparison with other communication media. For example, the availability of the services attracted people seeking frequent emotional support but this presented challenges to staff. More positively, the ability of the services to connect disparate individuals enabled them to form different kinds of satisfying relationships. The evolution of mixed communication forms, such as internet-based voice communication and smartphone-based visual communication, makes analysis at the level of a technology's characteristics useful. Such a cross-cutting perspective can inform both the design of interventions and assessment of their suitability for different manifestations of loneliness.

Service-users’ perspectives of link worker social prescribing: a qualitative follow-up study

WILDMAN Josephine M., et al
2019

Background: Social prescribing enables health-care professionals to address non-medical causes of ill-health by harnessing the resources of the voluntary and community sectors in patient care. Although increasingly popular in the UK, evidence for the effectiveness of social prescribing is inconclusive and longer-term studies are needed. This study aimed to explore experiences of social prescribing among people with long-term conditions one to two years after their initial engagement with a social prescribing service. Methods: Qualitative methods comprising semi-structured follow-up interviews were conducted with 24 users of a link worker social prescribing service who had participated in an earlier study. Participants were aged between 40 and 74 years and were living in a socioeconomically-deprived area of North East England. Results: Participants reported reduced social isolation and improvements in their condition management and health-related behaviours. However, many participants had experienced setbacks, requiring continued support to overcome problems due to multi-morbidity, family circumstances and social, economic or cultural factors. Findings indicated that, in this sample of people facing complex health and socioeconomic issues, longer-term intervention and support was required. Features of the link worker social prescribing intervention that were positively appraised by participants, included a highly personalised service to reflect individual goal setting priorities and a focus on gradual and holistic change dealing with issues beyond health. The important role of a strong and supportive relationship with an easily-accessible link worker in promoting sustained behaviour change highlights the importance of link worker continuity. A lack of suitable and accessible voluntary and community services for onward referral acted as a barrier to involvement for some participants. Conclusions: This study highlights issues of interest to commissioners and providers of social prescribing. Engagement with social prescribing for up to two years was examined and continued involvement was identified for those with complex issues, suggesting that a long-term intervention is required. The availability of onward referral services is an important consideration for social prescribing in a time of constrained public spending. From a research perspective, the range of improvements and their episodic nature suggest that the evaluation of social prescribing interventions requires both quantitative and qualitative data collected longitudinally.

Building age-friendly neighbourhoods in Greater Manchester: evidence from the Ambition for Ageing programme

THORLEY Jessica
2018

This report draws on research and learning gathered from the Ambition for Ageing programme, which aimed to help to create more age-friendly places and empower people to live fulfilling lives as they age. Using data and information collected from the programme, the report looks at what older people across Greater Manchester thinks makes a neighbourhood age-friendly. It draws on the: event feedback, participant and volunteer survey responses and a snapshot of case studies. The programme identified key themes for building age-friendly neighbourhoods. These are: the need for positive social connections and community cohesion; participation and meeting opportunities; good accessibility, facilities and transport; community spaces and resources; feelings of safety and security; and available information with effective communication.

Londoners said: an analysis of the Thrive LDN community conversations

DAVIE E., et al
2018

This report presents feedback from 17 community workshops, delivered by Thrive LDN in partnership with the Mental Health Foundation, which asked Londoners how they could be better supported to be mentally healthy. The workshops were attended by over 1,000 Londoners including those who commission, provide and use services. In the workshops Londoners gave their views on how Thrive LDN's six aspirations to improve mental health could be delivered. The report includes quotations from attendees. The solutions shared common themes of spreading knowledge, skills and support so that people can better look after themselves and their neighbours. It shows that as well as wanting access to services, Londoners want to be able to help themselves. The report makes recommendations based on the discussions. These include: the development of a network of community champions to tackle isolation; using technological platforms to inform people about support and activities in their community; supporting the development of non-clinical crisis and other wellbeing centres; and providing support for parents through peer-parenting groups.

Results 1 - 10 of 40

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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