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Results for 'values'

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Evaluating the Side by Side peer support programme

BILLSBOROUGH Julie, et al
2017

An evaluation of the Side by Side programme, which aimed to increase the availability and quality of community based peer support for people experiencing mental health problems across England. The programme was led by the mental health charity Mind, in collaboration with Depression Alliance and Bipolar UK. The evaluation covered four areas: developing and testing a set of values and principles for peer support; examining the effectiveness of peer support, including changes in wellbeing; building capacity for peer support; and commissioning peer support. It also explored how peer support took place within Side by Side projects specifically aimed at peers from a Black and Minority Ethnic background. The evaluation found that peer support was valued and helpful to people involved. It also identified six core values that appeared to underpin all forms of peer support - experience in common, safety, choice and control, two way interactions, human connection, and freedom to be oneself. The findings suggest that peer support enabled people to recover a sense of personal agency and usefulness, which was beneficial to their wellbeing. The evaluation also suggests that peer support works best where commissioners, provider organisations and communities work together to develop a range of approaches to peer support and where people are enabled to take control of how and when they engage with the peer support. The evaluation team was a partnership that included a mental health research team from St George’s, University of London, the McPin Foundation.

The place of kindness: combating loneliness and building stronger communities

FERGUSON Zoe
2017

Reports on the second stage of a project to explore what can encourage kinder communities at a time when isolation and loneliness are recognised as major challenges. The project was carried out by the Carnegie UK Trust with the support of Joseph Rowntree Foundation, It worked with seven organisations in Scotland over a period of nine months, exploring the importance of places and opportunities to connect, and the intrinsic values that underpin interactions and relationships. This report identifies examples which show how kindness and everyday relationships can affect change and support the wellbeing of individuals and communities. It also identifies key factors that get in the way of encouraging kindness both in individuals and organisations. These include real and imagined rules relating to risk; funders and policy makers valuing the formal and organisational over the informal and individual; and modern definitions of professionalism and good leadership obscuring every day and intuitive human interactions. Examples of the work carried out by the seven organisations are included in the appendices.

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