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Results for 'voluntary organisations'

Results 1 - 10 of 16

Rolling out social prescribing: understanding the experience of the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector

COLE Aimie, JONES Dan, JOPLING Kate
2020

This report sets out the findings of research to explore the perspectives and experiences of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in relation to the NHS rollout of social prescribing. The research heard from over 300 people through a series of interviews, workshops and online engagements between December 2019 and June 2020. NHS England has made a significant commitment to ensure that social prescribing is available across the country, including the recruitment of over 1,000 specialist link workers during 2020/21. The study explored key components of the programme and its implications, including: the new social prescribing link workers; measurement; funding; inequality; and coordination, collaboration and partnership. The findings indicate that the VCSE sector is supportive of social prescribing and keen to work constructively with the health system. However, in many places the pace of the rollout has had a destabilising effect by cutting across existing schemes, or failing to build on and invest in the work already done by the sector. Respondents were committed to measurement and using performance data for management and improvement but there are concerns about the use of appropriate measures, which capture the social as well as clinical outcomes of social prescribing. Funding was by far the biggest concern for all those who took part, and specifically in relation to funding for services and activities provided by the VCSE sector. In addition, without appropriate investment, social prescribing could exacerbate inequality in a range of ways – generalist link workers may lack the skills or resources to engage effectively with excluded individuals and communities while poorer communities tend to have lower levels of formal VCSE activity. The findings emphasise that effective social prescribing depends on relationships, both at individual and organisational level – VCSE experiences of the rollout have been most positive in places where relationships were already established.

Simply the best? Making Leeds the best city to grow old in

MELANIE HENWOOD ASSOCIATES
2020

Research exploring the local strategic policy context for meeting the care and health need of older people in Leeds, and how the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks understand and contribute to the agenda. The Leeds Neighbourhood Network (LNN), comprised of 37 locally led ‘schemes’ operated by a number of voluntary sector organisations, provides preventative support to older people in order to enable them to continue living independently and participate in their communities. They assist with a range of services and activities that promote the independence, health and wellbeing of older people throughout Leeds. This paper outlines the number of opportunities and challenges the LNNs face within the strategic policy context, and looks at the potential for Leeds to share more widely the benefits of its approach and experience. It describes how the LNNs are firmly rooted in their local neighbourhoods and understand the needs and preferences of local citizens they are in touch with and suggests there is an opportunity for them to develop a more outward looking style and connect people to a much wider range of community assets and resources. Furthermore, the LNNs could be more closely involved in supporting self-management for people with long-term conditions, and for health practitioners to benefit from being able to access groups of people needing support with diabetes, or COPD, or similar chronic conditions. Among the challenges, the paper cites the extremely diverse nature of LNNs, the risk that other third sector organisations perceive their own contribution to be less valued, the need to constantly adjust and tailor the ‘offer’ to reflect the changing needs of the older population, the lack of synergy between the LNNs and partners, the difficulties in implementing and evidencing strengths and asset-based approaches and the uncertainty about future funding and the direction of government policy.

Impact of social prescribing to address loneliness: a mixed methods evaluation of a national social prescribing programme

FOSTER Alexis, et al
2020

Loneliness is considered a global public health issue because of its detrimental impact on physical and mental health but little is known about which interventions can reduce loneliness. One potential intervention is social prescribing, where a link worker helps service‐users to access appropriate support such as community activities and social groups. Some qualitative studies have identified that social prescribing may help to reduce service‐users’ loneliness. Given this, the British Red Cross (a third sector organisation) developed and delivered a national social prescribing service in the United Kingdom to support people who were experiencing, or at risk of, loneliness. Service‐users could receive up to 12 weeks of support from a link worker. A mixed methods study was conducted to understand the impact of the support on loneliness, and to identify the facilitators and barriers to service delivery. The study included: (a) analysis of quantitative data collected routinely between May 2017 and December 2019 (n = 10,643) including pre‐post analysis of UCLA data (n = 2,250) and matched comparator work to measure changes in loneliness; (b) semi‐structured interviews with service‐users, link workers and volunteers (n = 60) and (c) a Social Return on Investment Analysis. The majority of the service‐users (72.6%, n = 1634/2250) felt less lonely after receiving support. The mean change in UCLA score was −1.84 (95% CI −1.91 to −1.77) of a maximum change of 6.00 (decrease indicates an improvement). Additional benefits included improved wellbeing, increased confidence and life having more purpose. The base case analysis estimated a social return on investment of £3.42 per £1 invested in the service. Having skilled link workers and support tailored to individual needs appeared key. However, challenges included utilising volunteers, meeting some service‐users’ needs in relation to signposting and sustaining improvements in loneliness. Nonetheless, the service appeared successful in supporting service‐users experiencing loneliness.

Signposting and navigation services for older people: economic evidence

BAUER Annette, et al
2019

Health, social care and other local government services can help ‘signpost’ or facilitate links to community and voluntary organisations that can help address social isolation and loneliness. This summary presents evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of signposting and navigation to tackle loneliness experienced by older people. It draws on evidence from a systematic review funded by The Campaign to End Loneliness. The evidence suggests that signposting and navigation services have the potential to achieve positive return on investments. However, evidence is restricted to a few small-scale studies and modelling. Further research is needed to test those findings.

Help-at-home for older people: economic evidence

BAUER Annette, TINELLI Michela, GUY Danielle
2019

This case summary provides economic evidence on Help-at-home schemes for older people, drawing on an economic evaluation of a scheme run by Age UK in England. Help-at-home schemes are usually run by voluntary and community organisations, and provide older people with a range of community support services to support older people living in their own homes. These services can include emotional, social, practical and financial support. Evidence from the evaluation suggests that Help-at-home schemes save local government and the NHS around £1500 per person per year, owing to people remaining longer in their homes, fewer GP appointments, and fewer hospital admissions. Volunteers providing support may also benefit, making them more likely to find jobs after gaining skills through volunteering. The summary notes that many of the benefits of help-at-home schemes are likely to depend on local infrastructures and how such schemes are run, making it hard to generalise their value.

WRVS: delivering the preventative social care agenda

BERRY Lynne
2010

This article starts by outlining the importance of increased prevention investment and produces a series of evidence that emphasises how preventative approaches improve the quality of life of older people, whilst providing value for money. It describes prevention in this context as: giving older people respect for who they are; giving older people the feeling they are in control; having people older people trust around them; and giving older people the help they want, when they need it. After providing simple statistics outlining the success, this article moves on to illustrate, through personal stories, how the work of the Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) sits at the heart of delivering the preventative social care agenda. The paper ends by putting out a question for debate: what will the entitlement to preventative support mean in practice in a reformed social care system?

Wellbeing Service

H4ALL

Hillingdon H4All is a social prescription/wellbeing service that supports patients 65 and over to better manage long term health conditions and social isolation. The service operates as a Community Interest Company (CIC) and is a collaboration between five prominent local third sector charities namely Age UK Hillingdon, Disablement Association Hillingdon (DASH), Harlington Hospice, Hillingdon Carers and Hillingdon Mind and is commissioned by Hillingdon CCG. The service is an augmentation of the former Primary Care Navigator (PCN) project which was managed by Age UK Hillingdon and funded by Hillingdon CCG in 2014. The new service was established in April 2016 and used learning from the former PCN project to provide an enhanced service with the following features:

Ageing Better: national evaluation short learning report: July 2018

CAMPBELL Diarmid, COX Korina
2018

Shares learning from the 14 partners of the Ageing Better programme, which aim to support people aged over 50 who are experiencing, or at risk of, social isolation and loneliness. The report draws on surveys of programme participants, visits to each of the 14 programme areas, and feedback from stakeholders from the partnerships. It reports that. to date, Ageing Better partnerships have worked with approximately 70,000 participants and 13,250 volunteers. The report also shows how Ageing Better, participants are, on average, less socially isolated and lonely, taking a more active role in their communities, have improved health and wellbeing, and are getting involved in delivering and designing projects. It also highlights benefits for volunteers and how Ageing Better is helping organisations improve partnership working and increasing skills, capacity and knowledge among participants helping to deliver and design programmes. Links to the partnership websites are also included.

Building dementia-friendly faith communities: how faith groups are supporting people living with dementia, their families and their carers

GARLAND Rodie
2017

This booklet is a collection of case studies that illustrate how faith communities from different traditions help support people living with dementia and their carers; and how they can also help to prevent dementia from developing in the first place. Faith communities can offer spiritual and emotional support for individuals affected by dementia; practical support, including activities and services, opportunities for social interactions and support with day-to-day living, such as transport and help with taking medication correctly; and a dementia-friendly faith-community within the wider community and a supportive network of motivated people and resources. In addition, faith groups can play an important role in prevention, and in helping people with the things that will reduce their risk of developing dementia. They can do this by helping people to keep mentally active – through opportunities for social engagement, such as meeting others and volunteering; through stimulating their brains through activities such as reading; and through helping people to keep learning new things. Faith groups can also help people adopt and follow a healthier lifestyle, through stopping smoking, reducing alcohol consumption, and encouraging physical activity and healthy eating. The report makes a number of suggestions on what the health and care system should know about engaging with faith communities. This includes: finding out whom to engage within the community; making links with institutions that train faith leaders; and considering the need for different approaches in different communities.

The community mapping toolkit: a guide to community asset mapping for community groups and local organisations

PRESTON CITY COUNCIL
2016

A toolkit to help community groups to map the individual, community and institutional assets in their local area. A community asset mapping can help to develop a picture of the community to shows its capacity and potential. This information can be used to gain a better understanding of community priorities and create neighbourhood action plans, which make the best use of the local assets. This toolkit explains the process behind asset mapping, looks at how to carry out a Community Street Audit, provides advice on making asset mapping meaningful and ensuring it leads to constructive action, and on involving different sections of the community - including community residents, elected councillors and representatives from local services. Finally it looks at the tools you may need, and how to keep community and local agencies informed of any action plans arising from the asset mapping.

Results 1 - 10 of 16

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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