Coronavirus guidance for social care and social work

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'voluntary organisations'

Results 1 - 10 of 13

Signposting and navigation services for older people: economic evidence

BAUER Annette, et al
2019

Health, social care and other local government services can help ‘signpost’ or facilitate links to community and voluntary organisations that can help address social isolation and loneliness. This summary presents evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of signposting and navigation to tackle loneliness experienced by older people. It draws on evidence from a systematic review funded by The Campaign to End Loneliness. The evidence suggests that signposting and navigation services have the potential to achieve positive return on investments. However, evidence is restricted to a few small-scale studies and modelling. Further research is needed to test those findings.

Help-at-home for older people: economic evidence

BAUER Annette, TINELLI Michela, GUY Danielle
2019

This case summary provides economic evidence on Help-at-home schemes for older people, drawing on an economic evaluation of a scheme run by Age UK in England. Help-at-home schemes are usually run by voluntary and community organisations, and provide older people with a range of community support services to support older people living in their own homes. These services can include emotional, social, practical and financial support. Evidence from the evaluation suggests that Help-at-home schemes save local government and the NHS around £1500 per person per year, owing to people remaining longer in their homes, fewer GP appointments, and fewer hospital admissions. Volunteers providing support may also benefit, making them more likely to find jobs after gaining skills through volunteering. The summary notes that many of the benefits of help-at-home schemes are likely to depend on local infrastructures and how such schemes are run, making it hard to generalise their value.

WRVS: delivering the preventative social care agenda

BERRY Lynne
2010

This article starts by outlining the importance of increased prevention investment and produces a series of evidence that emphasises how preventative approaches improve the quality of life of older people, whilst providing value for money. It describes prevention in this context as: giving older people respect for who they are; giving older people the feeling they are in control; having people older people trust around them; and giving older people the help they want, when they need it. After providing simple statistics outlining the success, this article moves on to illustrate, through personal stories, how the work of the Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) sits at the heart of delivering the preventative social care agenda. The paper ends by putting out a question for debate: what will the entitlement to preventative support mean in practice in a reformed social care system?

Wellbeing Service

H4ALL

Hillingdon H4All is a social prescription/wellbeing service that supports patients 65 and over to better manage long term health conditions and social isolation. The service operates as a Community Interest Company (CIC) and is a collaboration between five prominent local third sector charities namely Age UK Hillingdon, Disablement Association Hillingdon (DASH), Harlington Hospice, Hillingdon Carers and Hillingdon Mind and is commissioned by Hillingdon CCG. The service is an augmentation of the former Primary Care Navigator (PCN) project which was managed by Age UK Hillingdon and funded by Hillingdon CCG in 2014. The new service was established in April 2016 and used learning from the former PCN project to provide an enhanced service with the following features:

Ageing Better: national evaluation short learning report: July 2018

CAMPBELL Diarmid, COX Korina
2018

Shares learning from the 14 partners of the Ageing Better programme, which aim to support people aged over 50 who are experiencing, or at risk of, social isolation and loneliness. The report draws on surveys of programme participants, visits to each of the 14 programme areas, and feedback from stakeholders from the partnerships. It reports that. to date, Ageing Better partnerships have worked with approximately 70,000 participants and 13,250 volunteers. The report also shows how Ageing Better, participants are, on average, less socially isolated and lonely, taking a more active role in their communities, have improved health and wellbeing, and are getting involved in delivering and designing projects. It also highlights benefits for volunteers and how Ageing Better is helping organisations improve partnership working and increasing skills, capacity and knowledge among participants helping to deliver and design programmes. Links to the partnership websites are also included.

Building dementia-friendly faith communities: how faith groups are supporting people living with dementia, their families and their carers

GARLAND Rodie
2017

This booklet is a collection of case studies that illustrate how faith communities from different traditions help support people living with dementia and their carers; and how they can also help to prevent dementia from developing in the first place. Faith communities can offer spiritual and emotional support for individuals affected by dementia; practical support, including activities and services, opportunities for social interactions and support with day-to-day living, such as transport and help with taking medication correctly; and a dementia-friendly faith-community within the wider community and a supportive network of motivated people and resources. In addition, faith groups can play an important role in prevention, and in helping people with the things that will reduce their risk of developing dementia. They can do this by helping people to keep mentally active – through opportunities for social engagement, such as meeting others and volunteering; through stimulating their brains through activities such as reading; and through helping people to keep learning new things. Faith groups can also help people adopt and follow a healthier lifestyle, through stopping smoking, reducing alcohol consumption, and encouraging physical activity and healthy eating. The report makes a number of suggestions on what the health and care system should know about engaging with faith communities. This includes: finding out whom to engage within the community; making links with institutions that train faith leaders; and considering the need for different approaches in different communities.

The community mapping toolkit: a guide to community asset mapping for community groups and local organisations

PRESTON CITY COUNCIL
2016

A toolkit to help community groups to map the individual, community and institutional assets in their local area. A community asset mapping can help to develop a picture of the community to shows its capacity and potential. This information can be used to gain a better understanding of community priorities and create neighbourhood action plans, which make the best use of the local assets. This toolkit explains the process behind asset mapping, looks at how to carry out a Community Street Audit, provides advice on making asset mapping meaningful and ensuring it leads to constructive action, and on involving different sections of the community - including community residents, elected councillors and representatives from local services. Finally it looks at the tools you may need, and how to keep community and local agencies informed of any action plans arising from the asset mapping.

Joint review of partnerships and investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in the health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND, NHS ENGLAND
2016

This joint review sets out the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in improving health, wellbeing and care outcomes and identifies how the sector can best address potential challenges and maximise opportunities. The report places wellbeing at the centre of health and care services, and making VCSE organisations an integral part of a collaborative system. It makes 28 recommendations for government, health and care system partners, funders, regulatory bodies and the VCSE sector. Chapters: explore the contribution that VCSE organisations can play in reducing the human and financial costs associated with health inequalities, often through peer- and community-led activity; the benefits of partnership working and collaboration between commissioners, VCSE organisations and individuals; the importance of evidence and impact assessment, and how both can be used more effectively in health and care services; and the importance of commissioning practice, identifying a number of key principles that should underpin the funding relationship between public sector bodies and the VCSE sector. Each chapter looks at what is needed to achieve success and includes short case studies. The final chapters discuss the role of VCSE infrastructure bodies and set out the value of the Voluntary Sector Improvement Programme and recommendations for its future focus. Recommendations include the need for health and care services to be co-produced, focussed on wellbeing and valuing individuals' and communities' capacities and for social value to become a fundamental part of health and care commissioning and service provision.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet
2015

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES
2015

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

Results 1 - 10 of 13

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#