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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 1 - 10 of 133

The Kinect Project: group motion-based gaming for people living with dementia

DOVE Erica, ASTELL Arelene
2019

Engaging in enjoyable activities is an essential part of well-being, but people with dementia can find participation increasingly difficult. Motion-based technologies can provide meaningful engagement in a wide range of activities, but for people with dementia to take advantage of these devices requires a good understanding of how best to select and present these activities to this population. The objective of this study was to explore the use of motion-based technology (Xbox Kinect) as a group activity for people with dementia who attend adult day programmes. This qualitative study took place in an adult day programme for older adults with age-related challenges. Participants (n = 23) were observed while playing a digital bowling game presented on Xbox Kinect one hour per week for a period of 20 weeks, to capture naturalistic data. Field notes generated through observations were transcribed and analysed to identify emerging themes. The findings revealed three predominant themes which illustrate the potential of motion-based technology as a group activity for people with dementia who attend adult day programmes: (a) the importance of having a trained trainer, (b) learning versus mastery and (c) playing ‘independently together’. People with dementia can learn to play games presented on motion-based technology and enjoy doing so. Furthermore, using the technology in a group setting fostered an encouraging and supportive environment which further contributed to the leisure experience. However, to be used most effectively, staff must be trained to set-up and interact with the technology, as well as introduce, teach and support people with dementia to use it.

Testing the implementation of the Veder contact method: a theatre-based communication method in dementia care

BOERSMA Petra, et al
2019

Background and Objectives: There is a lack of research on implementation of person-centered care in nursing home care. The purpose of this study was to assess the implementation of the Veder contact method (VCM), a new person-centered method using theatrical, poetic and musical communication for application in 24-hr care. Research Design and Methods: Caregivers (n = 136) and residents (n = 141) participated in a 1-year quasi-experimental study. Foundation Theater Veder implemented VCM on six experimental wards and rated implementation quality. Six control wards delivered care-as-usual. Before and after implementation, caregiver behavior was assessed during observations using the Veder-observation list and Quality of Caregivers’ Behavior-list. Caregiver attitude was rated with the Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire. Quality of life, behavior, and mood of the residents were measured with QUALIDEM, INTERACT and FACE. Residents’ care plans were examined for person-centered background information. Results: Significant improvements in caregivers’ communicative behavior (i.e., the ability to apply VCM, establishing positive interactions) and some aspects of residents’ behavior and quality of life (i.e., positive affect, social relations) were found on the experimental wards with a high implementation score, as compared to the experimental wards with a low implementation score, and the control wards. No significant differences were found between the groups in caregivers’ attitudes, residents’ care plans, or mood. Discussion and Implications: The positive changes in caregivers’ behavior and residents’ well-being on the high implementation score wards confirm the partly successful VCM implementation. Distinguishing between wards with a high and low implementation score provided insight into factors which are crucial for successful implementation.

Loneliness: a reading list

BELLIS Alexander
2019

A selective reading list on loneliness, focusing mainly on research published since 2010. The references discuss both direct and indirect links to outcomes, both social isolation and loneliness or both causes and interventions. The references are categorised into several themes, which include: age-related studies, veterans, homelessness, disabled people, BAME communities, LGBT people, links to health and mental health, social media, costs of loneliness, and loneliness interventions. Not all are based on data from the UK.

Adopt a Care Home: an intergenerational initiative bringing children into care homes

DI BONA Laura, KENNEDY Sheila, MOUNTAIN Gail
2019

Dementia friendly communities, in which people living with dementia actively participate and those around them are educated about dementia, may improve the wellbeing of those living with dementia and reduce the associated stigma. The Adopt a Care Home scheme aims to contribute towards this by teaching schoolchildren about dementia and linking them with people living with dementia in a local care home. Forty-one children, 10 people living with dementia and 8 school/care home staff participated in a mixed methods (questionnaires, observations, interviews and focus groups) evaluation to assess the scheme’s feasibility and impact. Data were analysed statistically and thematically. The scheme was successfully implemented, increased children’s dementia awareness and appeared enjoyable for most participants. Findings, therefore, demonstrate the scheme’s potential to contribute towards dementia friendly communities by increasing children’s knowledge and understanding of dementia and engaging people living with dementia in an enjoyable activity, increasing their social inclusion.

Dance to Health 'Phase 1 roll-out [test and learn]' evaluation: first report

SHEFFIELD HALLAM UNIVERSITY. Sport Industry Research Centre
2019

An evaluation of the Dance to Health falls prevention dance programme. The evaluation investigates whether Dance to Health is an effective and cost-effective way to address older people’s falls and whether the programme helps older people in danger of falling overcome lost confidence, reduced independence and increased isolation. The evaluation used a mixed methods approach that included quantitative, qualitative and econometric research. Primary outcome measures included the impact on falls, positive side-effects (mentally and physically), patient pull, attendance and adherence, fidelity to existing falls prevention programmes and cost effectiveness. The findings show that Dance to Health is helping older people in danger of falling overcome lost confidence, reduced independence and increased isolation. There was a 44 percent reduction in the number of falls, positive improvements in participants' physical and mental wellbeing, including improved Timed Up and Go (TUG) times and reduced fear of falling. Additionally, based on the analysis conducted, there is a potential cost saving of over £149m over a 2-year period, of which £120m is a potential cost saving for the NHS. Dance to Health's fidelity to existing physiotherapy programmes was also confirmed. The evidence suggests that Dance to Health offers the health system a more effective and cost-effective means to address the issue of older people's falls.

Electronic assistive technology for community-dwelling solo-living older adults: a systematic review

SONG Yu, van der CAMMEN Tischa J.M.
2019

The proportion of older adults who live alone in single households is growing continuously. In the care of these solo-living older adults, electronic assistive technology (EAT) can play an important role. The objective of this review is to investigate the effects of EAT on the wellbeing of community-dwelling older adults living alone in single households. A systematic review of English articles was conducted based on PMC, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane database. Additional studies were identified from the references. In total, 16 studies were identified, six of them with follow-up. There is evidence that EAT can improve the physical and mental wellbeing of older adults. There was little evidence that EAT can improve social wellbeing. We conclude that more personalized designs and interventions, and more user engagement could be embedded in the design of EAT for solo-living community-dwelling older adults and that more evidence is needed regarding the effects of those interventions.

How do “robopets” impact the health and well‐being of residents in care homes? A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative evidence

ABBOTT Rebecca, et al
2019

BACKGROUND: Robopets are small animal-like robots which have the appearance and behavioural characteristics of pets. OBJECTIVE(S): To bring together the evidence of the experiences of staff, residents and family members of interacting with robopets and the effects of robopets on the health and well-being of older people living in care homes. DESIGN: Systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research. DATA SOURCES: This study searched 13 electronic databases from inception to July 2018 and undertook forward and backward citation chasing. METHOD(S): Eligible studies reported the views and experiences of robopets from residents, family members and staff (qualitative studies using recognised methods of qualitative data collection and analysis) and the effects of robopets on the health and well-being of care home residents (randomised controlled trials, randomised crossover trials and cluster randomised trials). Study selection was undertaken independently by two reviewers. This study used the Wallace criteria and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool to assess the quality of the evidence. This study developed a logic model with stakeholders and used this as a framework to guide data extraction and synthesis. Where appropriate, meta-analysis were used to combine effect estimates from quantitative studies. RESULT(S): Nineteen studies (10 qualitative, 2 mixed methods and 7 randomised trials) met the inclusion criteria. Interactions with robopets were described as having a positive impact on aspects of well-being including loneliness, depression and quality of life by residents and staff, although there was no corresponding statistically significant evidence from meta-analysis for these outcomes. Meta-analysis showed evidence of a reduction in agitation with the robopet "Paro" compared to control (-0.32 [95% CI -0.61 to -0.04, p = 0.03]). Not everyone had a positive experience of robopets. CONCLUSION(S): Engagement with robopets appears to have beneficial effects on the health and well-being of older adults living in care homes, but not all chose to engage. Whether the benefits can be sustained are yet to be investigated. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Robopets have the potential to benefit people living in care homes, through increasing engagement and interaction. With the robopet acting as a catalyst, this engagement and interaction may afford comfort and help reduce agitation and loneliness.

Agents for change: an evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme

COMMUNITY COUNCIL FOR SOMERSET
2017

An evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme, which aims to reduce isolation and help connect excluded and vulnerable people with services that support them to improve their independence, health and wellbeing. It uses locally based staff who act as first point of contact for people needing information and support. The evaluation, undertaken jointly by South West Forum and Clarity CiC with support from University of Gloucestershire, included analysis of client data, interviews with clients and discussions with locally based staff. Analysis was carried out between October 2016 and February 2017. The results of the evaluation found that the Somerset Village Agents programme is highly regarded by clients, statutory agencies and voluntary and public organisations who have a connection with the programme. It is also helping the most isolated, lonely and vulnerable people in the community, especially older people and those with disabilities and/or long-term health conditions. Areas for potential improvement identified by the evaluation included expanding reach of the programme to reach more younger people and more work to build community capacity. A cost benefit analysis of the programme estimates that for the 21-month period reviewed the Village Agents programme cost £646,000 to deliver and generated £2.5 million in direct savings to the state and a further £2.74 million in wider social value. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Age UK Doncaster Circles project: evaluation report 17/18

CLIFFORD Carol, BOWN Helen
2018

An evaluation of the Circles for Independence in Later Life (CFILL) project in Doncaster, from the period April 2017 to July 2018. Based on the Community Circles model, the project focuses on increasing social engagement, independence and resilience of older people, particularly those at risk of hospitalisation or entry into a care home. The model has been adapted to support older people who have no family or friends or where they don’t want them to be part of the circle. The volunteers becoming part of an older person’s social network or ‘circle’ rather than facilitating others to create one. The evaluation draws on both quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection. The findings show that during the evaluation period 112 people have been involved in the initiative, 76 have had contact with a Circles Connector at Age UK Doncaster, and 40 people out of the 76 who are actively engaged have been matched with a volunteer. The evaluation shows that the project is having a positive impact for those involved towards the four project outcomes: increased confidence in managing long-term health conditions and staying independent; improvements in mental wellbeing; an increase in social connections and less isolation; and benefits for families and volunteers.

An evaluation of Wolverhampton's social prescribing service: a new route to wellbeing

MASSIE Rachel, AHMAD Nahid
2019

An independent evaluation of Wolverhampton social prescribing pilot service, which was launched in 2017 by the Clinical Commissioning Group in collaboration with Wolverhampton Voluntary Sector Council. The evaluation found that the service, which provides a link between primary care services and voluntary and community organisations for those with non-clinical issues, is highly regarded. A total of 676 referrals were received between May 2017 and December 2018. The most common reasons for referral were loneliness and low-level mental health conditions. Link workers made onward referrals to over 150 groups and services. Participants reported a positive impact on mental health, wellbeing, confidence, self-esteem, and even physical health for those who had been referred. The report estimates that Return on Investment means that for every £1 spent on the social prescribing intervention, there will be a saving of £0.15 for primary care services. The researchers recommended further awareness-raising activities, quarterly progress reports and better communication to service users around the nature of the service and wider access, as well as improved data capture.

Results 1 - 10 of 133

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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