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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 1 - 10 of 74

Social prescribing: less rhetoric and more reality. A systematic review of the evidence

BICKERDIKE Liz, et al
2017

Objectives: Social prescribing is a way of linking patients in primary care with sources of support within the community to help improve their health and well-being. Social prescribing programmes are being widely promoted and adopted in the UK National Health Service and this systematic review aims to assess the evidence for their effectiveness. Setting/data sources: Nine databases were searched from 2000 to January 2016 for studies conducted in the UK. Relevant reports and guidelines, websites and reference lists of retrieved articles were scanned to identify additional studies. All the searches were restricted to English language only. Participants: Systematic reviews and any published evaluation of programmes where patient referral was made from a primary care setting to a link worker or facilitator of social prescribing were eligible for inclusion. Risk of bias for included studies was undertaken independently by two reviewers and a narrative synthesis was performed. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Primary outcomes of interest were any measures of health and well-being and/or usage of health services. Results: A total of 15 evaluations of social prescribing programmes were included. Most were small scale and limited by poor design and reporting. All were rated as a having a high risk of bias. Common design issues included a lack of comparative controls, short follow-up durations, a lack of standardised and validated measuring tools, missing data and a failure to consider potential confounding factors. Despite clear methodological shortcomings, most evaluations presented positive conclusions. Conclusions: Social prescribing is being widely advocated and implemented but current evidence fails to provide sufficient detail to judge either success or value for money. If social prescribing is to realise its potential, future evaluations must be comparative by design and consider when, by whom, for whom, how well and at what cost.

Evaluation of Doncaster Social Prescribing Service: understanding outcomes and impact

DAYSON Chris, BENNETT Ellen
2016

An evaluation of the Doncaster Social Prescribing Service, providing an analysis of outcomes for service users and the costs and benefits of the service between August 2015 and July 2016. It uses interviews with staff and key stakeholders from across health and social care, and users of the service; self-evaluation questionnaires from 292 people using the Service; and quality of life surveys completed by 215 users of the Service. The Social Prescribing Service reached more than 1,000 people referred by their GP, Community Nurse or Pharmacist and enabled almost 600 local people to access support within the community during the evaluation period. The main reasons for referral were a long term health or mental health condition. Positive outcomes for clients included improvements in health related quality of life (HRQL), social connectedness, and financial well-being. However, there was little evidence to suggest a reduction in the use of secondary care and inpatient stays. In health terms, the evaluation estimates that for every £1 of the £180,000 funding spent, the Service produced more than £10 of benefits in terms of better health.

The Rotherham Social Prescribing Service for People with long-term conditions: evaluation update

DAYSON Chris, DAMM Chris
2017

An updated assessment of the social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Service between September 2012 and March 2016. Originally commissioned as a two-year pilot in 2012 the service is now funded until 2018 through the Better Care Fund. Its two core features are: advisors providing a single gateway to voluntary and community sector (VCS) support for GPs and service users (advisors assess the support needs of patients and carers before referring on to appropriate VCS services) and a grant funding programme for VCS activities to meet the needs of service users. The evaluation reports that between September 2012 and March 2016 the Rotherham Social Prescribing Service supported more than 3,000 local people with long-term health conditions and their carers. It identifies reductions in service users’ use of secondary care, reduced admissions to Accident and Emergency, and improvements in the well-being of service users. Wider benefits seen in the VCS across Rotherham, include additional investment; developing and promoting social action and volunteering; and the development of a ‘micro-commissioning’ model. The evaluation also consistently demonstrated costs avoided by the NHS, with figures across the first four years of service equating to an estimated £647,000 of NHS costs avoided: an initial return on investment of 35 pence for each pound (£1) invested.

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds is an independent charity that gives support, advice and information to unpaid carers aged 16 and over, which in turn seeks to improve their overall physical, mental health and wellbeing. Established in 1996, a team of expert Carer Support Workers are dedicated to improving the lives of the 72,000 carers in Leeds. Carers Leeds seeks to address both national and local policy of people with care needs being supported in the community and to remain at home, when possible. In many instances, this support is provided by a family member or friend. For this to be sustainable, carers need to be able to look after their own health and social care needs which is why support services directly to support carers are vital.

Carers Leeds Health and Wellbeing programme evaluation

BUNYAN Ann-Marie, WOODALL James, RAINE Gary
2017

Highlights outcomes and learning from a programme to support carers to look after their own physical health and emotional wellbeing, delivered by the charity Carers Leeds. The programme provides one-to-one support to encourage carers to eat more healthily, be more physically active, cut down on alcohol and smoking, manage stress and anxiety and be more socially connected. Health and Wellbeing Support Workers work with carers to help them set and prioritise their health goals, providing carers with the tools and guidance to be able to make changes. The evaluation aimed to establish the impact of the Programme on the health and wellbeing of carers, examine the experiences of carers engaged in the Programme, and provide training and support to the Carers Leeds staff to build capacity for future self-evaluation. It a workshop to develop an understanding of the programme’s Theory of Change; analysis of monitoring data, including carers evaluation forms; telephone interviews with service users, and analysis of Support Worker' reflections on delivering the programme. The evaluation found evidence that the Programme provides meaningful support to carers, which has a positive impact on their health and wellbeing. Positive benefits for carers included reduced social isolation, increased confidence, improved mental wellbeing, improved diet and physical activity levels. Individuals who were previously unable to distinguish themselves as a carer were also able to recognise how vital it is to take of care of their own health. The report also highlights learning for future projects.

The place of kindness: combating loneliness and building stronger communities

FERGUSON Zoe
2017

Reports on the second stage of a project to explore what can encourage kinder communities at a time when isolation and loneliness are recognised as major challenges. The project was carried out by the Carnegie UK Trust with the support of Joseph Rowntree Foundation, It worked with seven organisations in Scotland over a period of nine months, exploring the importance of places and opportunities to connect, and the intrinsic values that underpin interactions and relationships. This report identifies examples which show how kindness and everyday relationships can affect change and support the wellbeing of individuals and communities. It also identifies key factors that get in the way of encouraging kindness both in individuals and organisations. These include real and imagined rules relating to risk; funders and policy makers valuing the formal and organisational over the informal and individual; and modern definitions of professionalism and good leadership obscuring every day and intuitive human interactions. Examples of the work carried out by the seven organisations are included in the appendices.

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference

SOCIAL PRESCRIBING NETWORK
2016

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference, which sets out a definition of social prescribing, outlines principles for effective service provision and the steps needed to evaluate and measure the impact of social prescribing. It also includes an analysis of a pre-conference survey, completed by 78 participants to explore their experience of social prescribing. Key ingredients identified that underpin social prescribing included: funding, healthcare professional buy-in, simple referral process, link workers with appropriate training, patient centred care, provision of services, patient buy-in and benefits of social prescribing. The benefits of social prescribing fell into six broad headings: physical and emotional health and wellbeing; behaviour change; cost effectiveness and sustainability; capacity to build up the voluntary community; local resilience and cohesion; and tackling the social determinants of ill health. Afternoon sessions covered the following topics: obtaining economic data on social prescribing; engaging different stakeholders in social prescribing; standards and regulations that could be applied to social prescribing services; qualities and skills necessary to commission high quality social prescribing services; designing research studies on social prescribing. Short case studies are included. There was consensus from participants that social prescribing provides potential to reduce pressures on health and care services through referral to non-medical, and often community-based, sources of support.

Understanding local needs for wellbeing data measures and indicators

BROWN Helen, ADBALLAH Saamah, TOWNSELY Ruth
2017

This report presents a new Local Wellbeing Indicator set for local authorities, public health leaders and Health and Wellbeing boards to help local decision-makers better understand the wellbeing of their local populations, and how they can act to improve it. The set is the product of a six-month scoping project co-commissioned by the Office for National Statistics (ON) and Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with the What Works Centre for Wellbeing and Happy City. The report outlines the rationale for the selection of indicators, details the methodology used, and presents the indicators. The final framework consists of an ‘ideal’ set and a ‘currently available’ set of Local Wellbeing indicators, recognising that some of the indicators proposed in the ideal set are not yet available at the local authority level. The ‘ideal’ set is based on a core of 26 indicators of individual wellbeing and its determinants. The ‘currently available’ set contains 23 indicators. Both the ‘ideal’ and ‘currently available’ sets are built around seven domains: personal wellbeing, economy, education and childhood, equality, health, place and social relationships. The report also includes recommendations for additional ‘deeper dive’ support indicators that provide more detailed insight in specific areas and contexts. The indicators aim to meet the need for a practical local translation of the Measuring National Wellbeing programme Office, introduced by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in 2011.

A summary of Age UK's Index of Wellbeing in Later Life

GREEN Marcus, et al
2017

The Wellbeing in Later Life Index, developed by Age UK and the University of Southampton, provides a measure to assess the wellbeing of older people in the UK. The measure looked at wellbeing across 40 indicators covering five key areas – social, personal (living arrangements, thinking skills, family status), health, financial and environmental. This report summarises the work carried out to develop the index and presents results of an analysis of data from 15,000 people aged 60. It provides a picture of older people’s wellbeing across the population and factors that contributed to people having the highest and lowest wellbeing scores. The analysis found that a range of factors under each of the key areas play a part in contributing to a person’s overall sense of wellbeing in later life. It also identified a large gap between older people with the highest and lowest wellbeing. The results identified the importance of being engaged in the world around you, whether through social or creative or physical activities or belonging to a community group. Other domains also played a supporting role, as adequate income, good health, good social network, and access to local facilities make it easier to participate in society. Those in the lowest wellbeing group were more likely to report being on means-tested benefits, having poor health and low satisfaction with local services.

Enabling change through communities of practice: Wellbeing Our Way

KOUSSA Natalie
2017

Summarises learning from a National Voices programme, Wellbeing Our Way, which aimed to explore how communities of practice could contribute to large-scale change across the health and care voluntary and community sector. The programme brought together people from charities, community organisations and people with experience of using health and care services to enable people to increase their knowledge and skills around a range of person- and community-centred approaches. The report provides an overview and learning from the national communities of practice and from two place-based communities of practice in Greater Manchester, which focused on peer support and self-management. Key learning for facilitating change through communities of practice identified includes: the importance of co-design; good facilitation; identifying specific expertise within the community of practice; having a clear area of focus of the community; having a clearly defined goal when looking to enable organisational change; and involving senior leaders to increase the chance of encouraging change. Individuals involved in the programme also explain how it has helped them initiate change in their practice and organisation. Results from the programme evaluation found that 79 per cent of participants were able to increase their knowledge and skills and 64 per cent were enabled, partly enabled, to create change in their organisation.

Results 1 - 10 of 74

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