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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 1 - 10 of 148

Is co-living a good choice to support healthy, happy ageing at home? Summary and conclusions

BURGESS Gemma
2019

A summary of research carried out by the Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research to explore the extent to which co-living housing models might provide a good housing solution for people as they get older. Co-living is a form of housing that combines private living spaces with shared communal facilities, and explicitly seeks to promote social contact and build community. Models include cohousing communities where people live together in a community setting and homeshares, where an older person lives alongside a younger person. This research summary outlines some of the benefits and risks of co-living models.

What is the evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being? A scoping review

FANCOURT Daisy, FINN Saoirse
2019

This scoping review maps the current evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being, with a specific focus on the WHO European Region. Over 900 publications were identified, including reviews, systematic reviews, metaanalyses and meta-syntheses covering over 3000 studies, and over 700 further individual studies. Overall, the findings demonstrated that the arts can play a major role in the prevention of ill health, promotion of health, and management and treatment of illness across the lifespan. Within prevention and promotion, findings showed how the arts can: affect the social determinants of health, support child development, encourage health-promoting behaviours, help to prevent ill health and support caregiving. Within management and treatment, findings showed how the arts can: help people experiencing mental illness; support care for people with acute conditions; and support end-of-life care. The report raises policy considerations relevant to the cultural and the health and social care sectors. It concludes that the beneficial impact of the arts could be furthered through acknowledging and acting on the growing evidence base; promoting arts engagement at the individual, local and national levels; and supporting cross-sectoral collaboration.

Social return on investment analysis of the health and wellbeing impacts of Wildlife Trust programmes

BAGNALL Anne-Marie, et al
2019

An analysis the social value of the Wildlife Trusts’ nature conservation projects, which offer outdoor volunteering opportunities and programmes that support people experiencing problems such as anxiety, stress or mild depression. The analysis, carried out by researchers at the Centre for Health Promotion Research at Leeds Beckett University, draws on the conclusions of three years of research on Wildlife Trusts’ projects. The results show that people participating in outdoor nature conservation activities felt better both emotionally and physically. The analysis calculates that for every £1 invested in general volunteering projects to tackle problems like physical inactivity or loneliness for people with average to high wellbeing, the social return on investment (SROI) was £8.50. For every £1 invested in targeted nature projects to tackle specialised health or social needs for people with low wellbeing at baseline, there was a £6.88 return. The report concludes that conservation activities should be encouraged as part of psychological wellbeing interventions.

Indoor nature interventions for health and wellbeing of older adults in residential settings: a systematic review

YEO Nicola L., et al
2019

Background and Objectives: Having contact with nature can be beneficial for health and wellbeing, but many older adults face barriers with getting outdoors. This study conducted a systematic review of quantitative studies on health and wellbeing impacts of indoor forms of nature (both real and simulated/artificial), for older adults in residential settings. Research Design and Methods: Search terms relating to older adults and indoor nature were run in 13 scientific databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, AgeLine, Environment Complete, AMED, PsychINFO, EMBASE, HMIC, PsychARTICLES, Global Health, Web of Knowledge, Dissertations and Theses Global, and ASSIA). This study also pursued grey literature, global clinical trials registries, and a range of supplementary methods. Results: Of 6,131 articles screened against eligibility criteria, 26 studies were accepted into the review, and were quality-appraised using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) tool. The participants were 930 adults aged over 60. Nature interventions and health/wellbeing outcomes were heterogeneous, which necessitated a narrative synthesis. The evidence base was generally weak, with 18 of 26 studies having a high risk of bias. However, several higher-quality studies found indoor gardening and horticulture programs were effective for cognition, psychological wellbeing, social outcomes, and life satisfaction. Discussion and Implications: There is inconsistent evidence that indoor nature exposures are beneficial for older care residents. This study suggests that successful interventions were, at least partly, facilitating social interaction, supporting feelings of autonomy/control, and promoting skill development, that is, factors not necessarily associated with nature per se. Higher-quality studies with improved reporting standards are needed to further elucidate these mechanisms.

Designing digital skills interventions for older people

PIERCY Laurence
2019

The internet and digital technologies can play a valuable role in supporting older and disabled people to improve health and wellbeing and gain easier access to health and care services. This report brings together recommendations for designing digital skills interventions for older people with care and support needs. It draws on insights from pathfinders in Sunderland and Thanet, which were funded by NHS Digital and supported by Good Things Foundation as part of the Widening Digital Participation programme. The pathfinders generated insights on small system-level changes that can embed digital inclusion in social care support and factors influencing digital inclusion within social housing schemes. The pilots also highlight the importance of engaging people at the right time when they can find relevance and value in technology. A list of useful resources are also included.

Healing the generational divide: interim report on intergenerational connection

ALL-PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON SOCIAL INTEGRATION
2019

Interim report of the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Social Integration inquiry on intergenerational connection, which examines the current gap between older and younger people, and what can be done to bridge it. The report sets out a series of suggestions to bring people of all ages and backgrounds together under four main policy areas: community projects and initiatives; public services; housing and planning; and technology. The report highlights how intergenerational projects are particularly effective in achieving social integration, improving wellbeing and tackling loneliness. It also includes examples of successful initiatives It highlights the benefits of taking a whole-society approach, including all policy areas and involving national and local government, not-for-profit organisations, the private sector and academia. Specific recommendations include: for nurseries, schools and care homes to foster connections between the different generations who use their services and, where possible, to co-locate services on one site and the creation of a national volunteering scheme that encourages older people to volunteer in their communities when they retire.

Review of the impact of loneliness and social isolation on health and well-being and whether people who experience loneliness/social isolation have higher use of public services

WEAKLAND John H, OWENS Janine, SIROIS Fuschia M.
2019

This research, carried out by the University of Sheffield and OB3 Research, explores whether loneliness and social isolation result in increased use of public and health services. It also looks at the types of contexts that led to increased or decreased service use as a result of loneliness and social isolation. The research involved a scoping review of the literature, a meta-analysis of nine papers and a consultation with 10 key organisations representing a range of groups in Wales. The consultation identified issues for a number of groups, including children, older people, refugees and asylum seekers, LGBTQ people, single parents, and carers. The findings suggest that loneliness and social isolation do play a part in increased use of services, but that loneliness and social isolation alone do not create the conditions for increased service use. Perceptions of loneliness and social isolation for the service users can also be intensified by inconsistency in accessing services, particularly for those who are from already stigmatised groups. The report discusses key themes and their relationship with loneliness, social isolation, access to services and service use. Including: stigma and service use; service related barriers; bullying and victimisation; disabilities; housing, poverty, and changes to service delivery. It makes 16 recommendations for the Welsh Government, which include: for research into loneliness and social isolation, and the recruitment of more peer support workers into the voluntary and public sector to support different groups of people.

Connections with nature for people living with dementia

EVANS Simon Chester, et al
2019

Purpose: The benefits of “green dementia care”, whereby people living with dementia are supported to connect with nature, are increasingly being recognised. Evidence suggests that these benefits span physical, emotional and social spheres and can make a significant contribution towards quality of life. However, care settings often present specific challenges to promoting such connections due to a range of factors including risk-averse cultures and environmental limitations. The purpose of this paper is to report on a project that aims to explore the opportunities, benefits, barriers and enablers to interaction with nature for people living with dementia in residential care and extra care housing schemes in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: Data were gathered from 144 responses to an online survey by managers/staff of extra care housing schemes and care homes in the UK. In depth-case studies were carried out at three care homes and three extra care housing schemes, involving interviews with residents, staff and family carers. Findings: A wide variety of nature-based activities were reported, both outdoor and indoor. Positive benefits reported included improved mood, higher levels of social interaction and increased motivation for residents, and greater job satisfaction for staff. The design and layout of indoor and outdoor spaces is key, in addition to staff who feel enabled to promote connections with nature. Research limitations/implications: This paper is based on a relatively small research project in which the participants were self-selecting and therefore not necessarily representative. Practical implications: The paper makes some key recommendations for good practice in green dementia care in extra care housing and care homes. Social implications: Outdoor activities can promote social interaction for people living with dementia in care settings. The authors’ findings are relevant to the recent policy focus on social prescribing. Originality/value: The paper makes some key recommendations for good practice in green dementia care in extra care housing and care homes.

The lives we want to lead: the LGA green paper for adult social care and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

A consultation paper from the Local Government Association, which seeks views on the future of care and support for adults and their unpaid carers. The paper puts forward options to secure the immediate and long-term funding for adult social care, and makes the case for a shift towards preventative, community-based personalised care, which helps maximise people's health, wellbeing and independence. It also considers the importance of housing, public health, other council services, in supporting wellbeing and prevention. Sections cover: differing views about the future of long-term funding for social care; the wider changes needed across care and health to bring out a greater focus on community-based and person-centred prevention; the role of public health and wider council services in supporting and improving wellbeing; and the nature of the relationship between social care and health, integration, accountability and how the new NHS funding could be used for maximum impact. Thirty consultation questions are included throughout the report. The consultation will run until 26 September 2018.

Let's Dance! How dance improves physical and mental health: a briefing for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

This briefing provides examples to show some of the ways that dance is being used to improve people's physical and mental wellbeing across Wales. The initiatives include: Movement for Stroke Rehabilitation, delivered in partnership with Cardiff and Vale University Health Board (UHB) and Rubicon Dance; Breakin’ for Better Mental Health, which involves both breakdancing and rap music as expressive art forms to improve young people’s emotional and mental health; Dance for Parkinson’s; Dance to Health, a falls prevention project for older people been developed by Aesop and Swansea Bay UHBat Swansea Bay UHB. The examples show how dance initiatives can support the prevention agenda by helping people stay active and healthy outside of traditional health and social care settings.

Results 1 - 10 of 148

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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