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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 1 - 10 of 91

“It was the whole picture” a mixed methods study of successful components in an integrated wellness service in North East England

CHEETHAM M., et al
2018

Background: A growing number of Local Authorities (LAs) have introduced integrated wellness services as part of efforts to deliver cost effective, preventive services that address the social determinants of health. This study examined which elements of an integrated wellness service in the north east of England were effective in improving health and wellbeing (HWB). Methods: The study used a mixed-methods approach. In-depth semi-structured interviews (IVs) were conducted with integrated wellness service users (n = 25) and focus groups (FGs) with group based service users (n = 14) and non-service users (n = 23) to gather the views of stakeholders. Findings are presented here alongside analysis of routine monitoring data. The different data were compared to examine what each data source revealed about the effectiveness of the service. Results: Findings suggest that integrated wellness services work by addressing the social determinants of health and respond to multiple complex health and social concerns rather than single issues. The paper identifies examples of ‘active ingredients’ at the heart of the programme, such as sustained relationships, peer support and confidence building, as well as the activities through which changes take place, such as sports and leisure opportunities which in turn encourage social interaction. Wider wellbeing outcomes, including reduced social isolation and increased self-efficacy are also reported. Practical and motivational support helped build community capacity by encouraging community groups to access funding, helped navigate bureaucratic systems, and promoted understanding of marginalised communities. Fully integrated wellness services could support progression opportunities through volunteering and mentoring. Conclusions: An integrated wellness service that offers a holistic approach was valued by service users and allowed them to address complex issues simultaneously. Few of the reported health gains were captured in routine data. Quantitative and qualitative data each offered a partial view of how effectively services were working.

What is the impact on health and wellbeing of interventions that foster respect and social inclusion in community-residing older adults? A systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies

RONZI S., et al
2018

Background: Many interventions have been developed to promote respect and social inclusion among older people, but the evidence on their impacts on health has not been synthesised. This systematic review aims to appraise the state of the evidence across the quantitative and qualitative literature. Methods: Eligible studies published between 1990 and 2015 were identified by scanning seven bibliographic databases using a pre-piloted strategy, searching grey literature and contacting experts. Studies were included if they assessed the impact (quantitatively) and/or perceived impact (qualitatively) of an intervention promoting respect and social inclusion on the physical or mental health of community-residing people aged 60 years and older. Titles and abstracts were screened for eligibility by one reviewer. A second reviewer independently screened a 10% random sample. Full texts were screened for eligibility by one reviewer, with verification by another reviewer. Risk of bias was assessed using standardised tools. Findings were summarised using narrative synthesis, harvest plots and logic models to depict the potential pathways to health outcomes. Results: Of the 27,354 records retrieved, 40 studies (23 quantitative, 6 qualitative, 11 mixed methods) were included. All studies were conducted in high and upper middle-income countries. Interventions involved mentoring, intergenerational and multi-activity programmes, dancing, music and singing, art and culture and information-communication technology. Most studies (n = 24) were at high or moderate risk of bias. Music and singing, intergenerational interventions, art and culture and multi-activity interventions were associated with an overall positive impact on health outcomes. This included depression (n = 3), wellbeing (n = 3), subjective health (n = 2), quality of life (n = 2), perceived stress and mental health (n = 2) and physical health (n = 2). Qualitative studies offered explanations for mediating factors (e.g. improved self-esteem) that may lead to improved health outcomes and contributed to the assessment of causation. Conclusions: Whilst this review suggests that some interventions may positively impact on the health outcomes of older people, and identified mediating factors to health outcomes, the evidence is based on studies with heterogeneous methodologies. Many of the interventions were delivered as projects to selected groups, raising important questions about the feasibility of wider implementation and the potential for population-wide benefits.

Creative and cultural activities and wellbeing in later life

ARCHER Libby, et al
2018

This report explores the benefits of participating in creative and cultural activities for wellbeing in later life. It discusses what creative and cultural participation means and the types of activities people take part in, such as dance, craft, literary activities, music and historical activities. It also looks at the factors that can help people get involved and how levels of involvement can differ depending on people’s overall level of wellbeing. It includes examples of initiatives for older people, including Independent Arts’ participatory arts Time & Tide project and Out in the City’, a social initiative for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people over 50. It concludes with recommendations for practitioners and policymakers.

Health and well-being benefits of spending time in forests: systematic review

OH Byeongsang, et al
2017

Background: Numerous studies have reported that spending time in nature is associated with the improvement of various health outcomes and well-being. This review evaluated the physical and psychological benefits of a specific type of exposure to nature, forest therapy. Method: A literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, PubMed, ScienceDirect, EMBASE, and ProQuest databases and manual searches from inception up to December 2016. Key words: “Forest” or “Shinrin -Yoku” or “Forest bath” AND “Health” or “Wellbeing”. The methodological quality of each randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed according to the Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) tool. Results: Six RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Participants’ ages ranged from 20 to 79 years. Sample size ranged from 18 to 99. Populations studied varied from young healthy university students to elderly people with chronic disease. Studies reported the positive impact of forest therapy on hypertension (n = 2), cardiac and pulmonary function (n = 1), immune function (n = 2), inflammation (n = 3), oxidative stress (n = 1), stress (n = 1), stress hormone (n = 1), anxiety (n = 1), depression (n = 2), and emotional response (n = 3). The quality of all studies included in this review had a high ROB. Conclusion: Forest therapy may play an important role in health promotion and disease prevention. However, the lack of high-quality studies limits the strength of results, rendering the evidence insufficient to establish clinical practice guidelines for its use. More robust RCTs are warranted.

Measuring national well-being: quality of life in the UK, 2018

JONES Rhian, RANDALL Chris
2018

Latest update of the Measuring National Well-being programme, summarising how people of different ages are faring in the UK today across a range of measures of national well-being - which include health, natural environment, personal finances and crime. It reports a broadly positive picture of life in the UK, with most indicators either improving or staying the same. The main challenges to wellbeing varied across age groups. For younger people - challenges include unemployment, loneliness, having someone to rely on and a lack of sense of belonging to their neighbourhood; for people in their early and middle years - less likely to be satisfied with their leisure time; and for older people - lower satisfaction with their health and lower engagement with an art or cultural activity.

What works for wellbeing? A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes for music and singing in adults

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2018

Aims: The role of arts and music in supporting subjective wellbeing (SWB) is increasingly recognised. Robust evidence is needed to support policy and practice. This article reports on the first of four reviews of Culture, Sport and Wellbeing (CSW) commissioned by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded What Works Centre for Wellbeing (https://whatworkswellbeing.org/). Objective: To identify SWB outcomes for music and singing in adults. Methods: Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in PsychInfo, Medline, ERIC, Arts and Humanities, Social Science and Science Citation Indexes, Scopus, PILOTS and CINAHL databases. From 5,397 records identified, 61 relevant records were assessed using GRADE and CERQual schema. Results: A wide range of wellbeing measures was used, with no consistency in how SWB was measured across the studies. A wide range of activities was reported, most commonly music listening and regular group singing. Music has been associated with reduced anxiety in young adults, enhanced mood and purpose in adults and mental wellbeing, quality of life, self-awareness and coping in people with diagnosed health conditions. Music and singing have been shown to be effective in enhancing morale and reducing risk of depression in older people. Few studies address SWB in people with dementia. While there are a few studies of music with marginalised communities, participants in community choirs tend to be female, white and relatively well educated. Research challenges include recruiting participants with baseline wellbeing scores that are low enough to record any significant or noteworthy change following a music or singing intervention. Conclusions: There is reliable evidence for positive effects of music and singing on wellbeing in adults. There remains a need for research with sub-groups who are at greater risk of lower levels of wellbeing, and on the processes by which wellbeing outcomes are, or are not, achieved.

Building relationships between the generations: the case of the co-located nursery

NIGHTINGALE HAMMERSON
2018

This case study describes the development of the UK’s first intergenerational nursery, a partnership between the Apples and Honey Nursery group and the Jewish elderly care home charity Nightingale Hammerson. It covers the different stages of the project, from the initial idea, building community support and setting up a weekly intergenerational baby and toddler group in January 2017, to opening a day nursery within the grounds in September 2017, where intergenerational sessions between nursery children and care home residents take place daily. The report includes feedback from the first year of the intergenerational programme, including the views of families who attend the baby and toddler group, residents of the care home, volunteers, physiotherapists, parents from the new nursery, and staff from both organisations. It also includes early lessons learned as a result of including nursery children into weekly exercise classes with residents and observations from early year's teachers as to the impact of intergenerational play on the very young and those with dementia.

Evaluation of the volunteering in care homes project: summary report

HILL Matthew
2016

Summary report of an evaluation of the Volunteering in Care Homes (ViCH) project, which examines the impact of volunteering on residents, staff and volunteers and also explores the implications for developing volunteering in care homes more generally. The project was piloted in fourteen care homes, which placed trained volunteers in befriending and activity-based roles. The evaluation found good subjective evidence from staff and volunteer surveys of that befriending and activity-based volunteering roles have major positive impacts for residents in care homes, especially around social and emotional wellbeing. The majority of staff surveyed also felt the involvement of volunteers has a positive impact on their job, in terms of job satisfaction, retention and levels of stress. The evaluation also looked at the cost-effectiveness of the approach. The project had high start-up costs, with a positive ongoing value ratio achieved 18 months into the project. In order to deliver positive impacts for residents and staff, the project found that volunteers need to be effectively recruited, sufficiently trained, well matched and receive substantial ongoing support and coordination. Other factors identified that need to be addressed to enable volunteer engagement to become well established across the sector, include strategic leadership, culture change, good practice learning, financial resources and regulatory incentives.

Evaluation of Hale Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service 2017

DAYSON Chris, LEATHER David
2018

Reports on initial findings of an independent evaluation of the Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service in Bradford, covering the first nine months of the service (March-November 2017). It aims to answer some key questions about the Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service to support future commissioning by the CCG and its partners. The service was commissioned to improve the health, well-being and social connectedness of local people and reduce unplanned and unnecessary demand on primary and secondary health services. The service involves a referral from a GP of patients who could benefit from additional socially focussed support, followed by a home visit from a Community Connector to help identify what services and activities are available. The evaluation shows that a total of 703 local people were referred to the service for support by their GP. The majority of referrals were to address social issues such as anxiety and social isolation, however, a significant proportion of service users were also in poor health with long term conditions. It also identifies positive outcomes in relation to health, mental well-being, trust of people in their community, social connectedness and service users’ ability to self-care. Although too early to assess the impact on demand for primary and secondary care, service users recording up to nine per cent fewer Accident and Emergency and up to seven per cent fewer GP attendances after referral to the service.

An evaluation of the Standing Together project

MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
2018

An evaluation of the Standing Together project, which examines the impact of peer-support groups on the emotional and social wellbeing of people living in extra care housing. Specifically, it looks at whether participation in the Standing Together programme had an effect on the outcomes of loneliness and social isolation; emotional wellbeing; and meaningful activity and community engagement. The groups ran once a week for six months in 19 extra care housing schemes within Housing & Care 21 and Notting Hill Housing Trust. Each group was led by two trained facilitators. Facilitators sought to include all residents from the extra care housing group including individuals with mental health difficulties, dementia, learning disability and/or significant loneliness. Focus group findings, which consisted of 45 residents at baseline and 57 at follow-up, demonstrated that most residents felt that participating in the groups led to positive impacts in all the outcome areas. Residents also expressed a desire for the groups to continue. Staff involved in the programme also felt that the groups led to reduced feelings of isolation and loneliness, increased companionship, mental stimulation and social inclusion. The process evaluation also emphasised the value in having two skilled tactful facilitators in each group who are able to effectively manage a group of residents, some of whom may have dementia or cognitive impairments. The report includes recommendations for conducting evaluations of group work in later life.

Results 1 - 10 of 91

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