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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 1 - 10 of 163

Engaging with the arts to improve health and wellbeing in social care settings

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2020

This briefing, prepared for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health, provides innovative examples of arts-based activities which are being delivered in social care settings across Wales to improve people’s physical and mental wellbeing. They include Live Music Now which supports professional musicians to deliver evidence-based music workshops in care homes; cARTrefu, a project from Age Cymru to improve access to quality arts experiences for older people in residential care homes project; and Bangor University's Dementia and Imagination.

Connecting communities: a strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation

WALES. Welsh Government
2020

The young person's and community version of the Welsh Government strategy to tackle loneliness and social isolation. It outlines the Government's plan to tackle loneliness and social isolation and build a more connected society. It covers four priority areas: providing more opportunities for people to connect; providing good quality transport, community spaces and internet that help people connect; cohesive and supportive communities; and raising awareness of loneliness and social isolation. The strategy will be supported by funding over three years to support community-based organisations to deliver and test innovative approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

Social prescribing evidence map: summary report

PRICE Sian, HOOKWAY Amy, KING Sian
2017

Summary findings from an evidence mapping to share evidence on the effectiveness and practice of social prescribing to improve the health and well-being of individuals with social, emotional or practical needs. Sixty-two sources met the inclusion criteria for the evidence map. Two main types of social prescribing were identified. Those targeting psychosocial needs and those intended for people who are sedentary and/or overweight or obese. In total six types of social prescribing initiative are described: link worker programmes (schemes linking people to a facilitator who assessed them and referred them on to community support); community arts programmes; a horticultural programme; exercise referral schemes; commercial weight loss programmes and referral to welfare rights advice. The evidence mapping aims to support professionals looking to implement social prescribing interventions within primary and community care settings across Wales

Psychological benefits of attending the theatre associated with positive affect and well-being for subscribers over age 60

MEEKS Suzanne, VANDENBROUCKE Russell J., SHRYOCK S. Kelly
2020

Objectives: Although late adulthood may be a time of greater well-being, optimal aging still characterizes a minority of older adults. Understanding how individuals achieve well-being across adulthood is important for intervention and social policy. This study focused on how attending live theatre might enhance the well-being of a sample of 53 season ticket holders aged 60 and older. Based on a previously tested conceptual framework, we hypothesized that post-performance reports of social-cognitive experience while at the play would predict post-performance positive affect, which in turn would predict well-being. Method: The sample was a subset of volunteers from a large survey study of theatre ticket purchasers. They completed baseline and two-year follow-up measures of well-being, and questionnaires immediately after attending seven plays across two seasons: measures of social engagement, belonging, flow, positive affect, and their reactions to the plays. Results: This study found that sense of belonging, social engagement, and flow were associated with positive affect after performances, as hypothesized. This study also found that the cumulative positive affect experienced after plays in the two seasons predicted change in well-being between baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: The findings suggest that attending performances is a combined social, cognitive, and affective experience that transcends entertainment. Future research might investigate whether the psychological benefit model assessed in this study will generalize to other leisure activities that create similar engagement. The findings have implications for individuals seeking to promote their own well-being, and, possibly more importantly, for policies that support enriching cultural opportunities, particularly in the arts.

The contribution of community singing groups to the well-being of older people: participant perspectives from the United Kingdom

SKINGLEY Ann, MARTIN Anne, CLIFT Stephen
2016

Current evidence suggests that participatory arts activities, and particularly group singing, may contribute to the well-being of older people. However, there is currently a paucity of prospective research from the participant perspective. This qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial aimed to assess participants’ perspectives of the acceptability and effect on health and well-being of a community singing program for older people. Volunteers recruited to the intervention arm (n = 131) were invited to write comments on their experiences over three data collection points of a 14-week singing program. A subsample (n = 19) participated in a retrospective semi-structured interview. Data were subjected to content and thematic analysis. Comments and interviews from 128 individuals suggested that the singing groups led to specific, incremental benefits to physical, psychological, social, and community well-being. Benefits tended to tail off after the program ended. Suggestions were made for the future running of such groups.

Nostalgia as a psychological resource for people with dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence of effectiveness from experimental studies

ISMAIL Sanda Umar, et al
2020

Objective: This review systematically examines evidence relating to the effect of nostalgia on psychological well-being through a meta-analysis of measures of social connectedness, self-esteem, meaning in life, self-continuity, optimism and positive and negative affect. Rationale: If nostalgia is to be used as a clinical intervention to boost well-being in dementia by reducing threat, then it is important to assess its therapeutic potential. Results: Searches carried out in July 2014 and updated in February 2018 identified 47 eligible experimental studies comparing nostalgic reminiscence and non-nostalgic reminiscence to be included in the meta-analysis. Nostalgic reminiscence had moderate effects on positive affect (0.51 (0.37, 0.65), p= 0.001), social connectedness (0.72 (0.57, 0.87), p= 0.001), self-esteem (0.50 (0.30, 0.70), p= 0.001), meaning in life (0.77 (0.47, 1.08), p= 0.001) and optimism (0.38 (0.28, 0.47), p= 0.001) and a large effect on self-continuity (0.81 (0.55, 1.07), p= 0.001). There was, however, no difference between the effect of nostalgic reminiscence and non-nostalgic reminiscence for negative affect (−0.06 (−0.20, 0.09), p= 0.443). Conclusion: This systematic review and meta-analysis provides an overview of the evidence base for nostalgia. This is an important stage in developing nostalgia as a clinical intervention for people with dementia which might be achieved, for instance, by adapting current reminiscence and life review techniques. This meta-analysis will therefore also serve as a valuable reference point for the continued exploration of nostalgia as an intervention.

Wellbeing evidence at the heart of policy

HARDOON Deborah, HEY Nancy, BRUNETTI Silvia
2020

Improving wellbeing is widely recognised as a goal of policy and practice. This report sets out the state of the evidence and next steps for applying a wellbeing approach to decision making in the UK. It looks at what is meant by wellbeing and how it is currently measured in the UK and Internationally. It considers how wellbeing can be improved, including a review evidence of what works and tools those working in a policy context need to implement these findings. It also considers the challenges of implementing a wellbeing approach and the role businesses, communities and individuals can play. The final section outlines some of the issues which have yet to be tackled in order for wellbeing to become the dominant narrative which underpins the decisions taken.

Connected communities: a strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation and building stronger social connections

WALES. Welsh Government
2020

The Welsh Governnment's first strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation. It defines what is meant by loneliness and social isolation, describes the key priorities in tackling these issues and sets out the Government's approach for implementing the strategy. The strategy focuses on approaches that reduce the risk of, or prevent, loneliness and social isolation or that intervene early, before these become more entrenched. The strategy looks at the role Government can play and also how it can support local authorities, wider public services, the third sector and also the private sector. It also describes the important role that individuals can play in supporting each other in communities. The strategy has four priority areas: increasing opportunities for people to connect; improving the community infrastructure to support people to come together, including the areas of planning, housing and transport; cohesive and supportive communities; and build awareness and promote positive attitudes, which sets out how the Welsh Government will raise the profile of loneliness and social isolation and reduce stigma. Key commitments are listed under each priority area. The strategy will be supported by funding over three years to support community-based organisations to deliver and test innovative approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

The effect of music on wellbeing - case studies

CONROY Jill, FAULKNER Sue
2020

This article reports on a small scale study of the impact of personalised music on residents living with dementia in a care home. Three care homes (Fremantle Trust's Lent Rise House, Lewin House and Meadowside care homes) and nine people living with dementia took part in the two week study. Care staff and activity organisers selected times of day (and night) to play music or a radio station with the resident. The researchers collaborated with Unforgettable (now part of Live Better with Dementia), a company allied to the non-profit organisation Music and Memory which donates iPods to people living in care homes to deliver the intervention. Findings:Qualitative statements from the care homes were invariably positive. Personalised music was found to reduce agitation and improve mood. None of the people living with dementia were able to initiate music themselves, so it required either staff or visitors to play it. Conclusion: the findings suggest that, when compiled in a person-centred way, music can be a source of comfort and calm. It can counter distressing events, alleviate anxiety, and increase sociability. The paper also includes some implications for practice or tips on how to provide personalised music in care homes.

The impact of social prescribing services on service users: a systematic review of the evidence

PESCHENY Julia Vera, RANDHAWA Gurch, PAPPAS Yannis
2019

Background: Social prescribing initiatives are widely implemented in the UK National Health Service to integrate health and social care. Social prescribing is a service in primary care that links patients with non-medical needs to sources of support provided by the community and voluntary sector to help improve their health and wellbeing. Such programmes usually include navigators, who work with referred patients and issue onward referrals to sources of non-medical support. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence of service user outcomes of social prescribing programmes based on primary care and involving navigators. Methods: 11 databases, the grey literature, and the reference lists of relevant studies were searched to identify the available evidence on the impact of social prescribing on service users. Searches were limited to literature written in English. No date restrictions were applied, and searches were conducted to June 2018. Findings were synthesised narratively, employing thematic analysis. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool Version 2011 was used to evaluate the methodological quality of included studies. Results: Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The evidence base is mixed, some studies found improvements in health and wellbeing, health-related behaviours, self-concepts, feelings, social contacts and day-to-day functioning post-social prescribing, whereas others have not. The review also shows that the evaluation methodologies utilised were variable in quality. Conclusion: In order to assess the success of social prescribing services, more high quality and comparable evaluations need to be conducted in the future.

Results 1 - 10 of 163

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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