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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 1 - 10 of 177

Ageing Better Isle of Wight: final evaluation report

HARFLETT Naomi
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Evaluation of Ageing Better Isle of Wight

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Implementing the Care Act 2014:building social resources to prevent, reduce or delay needs for care and support in adult social care in England

TEW Jerry, et al
2019

This Report is based on research into ‘second wave’ approaches to prevention and capacity building that have become more prominent since the implementation of the Care Act 2014. These approaches involve a fundamental revisioning of the role of local services and seek to maximise resources and opportunities through working in more co-productive ways with citizens, families and communities. The findings are based on a national survey of local authorities and in-depth case study research with stakeholders, beneficiaries and family members in seven local authorities which were promoting one or more ‘second wave’ preventative initiatives. A key findings was that a preventative focus is still relatively new in adult social care and that approaches are often embedded within a variety of strategic initiatives, including: strengths-based models of social work and social care practice (such as 3 Conversations); approaches to social networking and building community capacity (such as Local Area Coordination); mobilising the resources of family and personal networks (through approaches such as Family Group Conferencing, peer support or Community Circles) and targeted ‘upstream’ use of personal budgets. Another finding was that overall, financial pressures were seen as the most important driver towards developing preventative activity, but, at the same time, this was also cited most frequently as the greatest barrier. Other frequently cited barriers to progressing the prevention agenda were competing policy imperatives and, in particular, perceived pressure to make rushed decisions in order to minimise delays in hospital discharge. The report also examines wellbeing outcomes and expenditure. The report makes recommendations for the policy, practice and implementation and evaluation contexts. The reports concludes that there is some strong evidence of the creativity and innovation that is taking place in a significant proportion of local authorities. While progress may not be consistent across the sector, the research shows that a sizable proportion of local authorities have been investing in activity that is designed to increase capacity and capability at individual, family and community levels, and thereby to contribute to preventing, reducing or delaying the need for adult social care services.

Evidence summary for policy: the role of arts in improving health & wellbeing: report to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport

FANCOURT Daisy, WARRAN Katey, AUGHTERSON Henry
2020

This report synthesised the findings from over 3,500 studies on the role of the arts in the prevention of ill health, promotion of health, and management and treatment of illness across the lifespan. The reviewed evidence included study designs such as randomized controlled studies, nationally-representative longitudinal cohort studies, communitywide ethnographies, cross-sectional surveys, laboratory experiments, and case studies. The review focuses on how arts engagement can impact on 1) social outcomes, 2) youth development and 3) the prevention of mental and physical illness. It also considers how social prescribing programmes that have used arts interventions can impact on the above three outcomes. The evidence summary assesses the type and quality of evidence available for each outcome. The findings show strong evidence for the following outcomes, suggesting that this evidence can be trusted to guide policy: the use of music to support infant social development; the use of book reading to support child social development; the use of music or reading for speech and language development amongst infants and children; the use of the arts to support aspects of social cohesion; the use of the arts to improve wellbeing (i.e. positive psychological factors) in adults; and the use of the arts to reduce physical decline in older age. In relation to the use of social prescribing (SP), the evidence is promising for wellbeing and social cohesion but weak for physical health and social inequalities, and non-existent for social development, the prevention of mental illness, and cognition. Nevertheless, economic evaluations suggest there may be benefits including returns on investment and social returns on investment from implementing arts-based SP.

Social prescribing for people with mental health needs living in disadvantaged communities: the Life Rooms model

HASSAN Shaima M., et al
2020

Background: People live socially complex lives and have different health care needs influenced by socio-economic factors such as deprivation, unemployment, and poor housing. Lack of access to community based social care results in people seeking social support from health care services. This study explores the Life Rooms as a social prescribing model addressing the social determinants of mental health by providing support and access to resources in a local community setting. With an aim to identify key elements that contribute toward enhancing the effectiveness of the Life Rooms social prescribing approach. Methods: Data were obtained through six semi-structured focus groups with mental health service users from two locations in the North West of the UK. Postcode data was collected to generate an Index for Multiple Deprivation (IMD) score, to understand their socio-economic background. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: A total of 18 participants took part in the study. The majority of participants came from disadvantaged backgrounds; 14 participants measuring 3 and below in terms of overall IMD scores and 9 participants belonged to the poorest decile (IMD score = 1). Participants reported on different elements of the Life Rooms which they found as an effective approach to care. Four main themes emerged from the data: 1) social belonging: being able to just ‘be’ 2) resourceful and accessible; 3) social inclusion and connectedness; and 4) moving forward: self-development and independence. Conclusion: Findings support the need and benefit social prescribing to improve mental health wellbeing and reduce the burden of mental illness.

Supporting access to activities to enhance well‐being and reduce social isolation in people living with motor neurone disease

SIMPSON Suzanne, et al
2020

Purpose: People living with Motor Neurone Disease (plwMND) have emphasised the importance of psychological support and well‐being in helping them manage their condition. Social prescribing is a formal process of referring patients with largely socioeconomic and psychosocial issues to a link worker to co‐design a plan to improve their health and well‐being. Intervention involves supporting engagement in meaningful activities based within the individual's local community. This pilot project aimed to explore the application of social prescribing with plwMND. Methods: A cohort of plwMND were supported by an occupational therapist and link worker to identify and access community‐based activities. Qualitative interviews were completed post‐intervention with the plwMND and the link workers. Findings were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: A total of nine plwMND took part in this pilot service, and five plwMND and four link workers were interviewed. PlwMND valued participation and wanted to engage in community‐based activities. Those with mild symptomatology were able to access activities and reported a positive impact on their well‐being. Those with more complex needs, particularly reduced mobility, experienced significant barriers to participation. Barriers included transport, equipment provision, lack of company to support participation and lack of confidence using mobility aids in a community environment. Link workers valued joint working with an occupational therapist. Conclusion: Social prescribing aims to address the health inequalities of those living with long‐term conditions, although currently it likely excludes plwMND. Future work needs to quantitatively evaluate the effects of the service on the well‐being of plwMND.

New horizons in supporting older people's health and wellbeing: is social prescribing a way forward?

HAMILTON-WEST Kate, MILNE Alisoun, HOTHAM Sarah
2020

Older people’s health and care needs are changing. Increasing numbers live with the combined effects of age-related chronic illness or disability, social isolation and/or poor mental health. Social prescribing has potential to benefit older people by helping those with social, emotional or practical needs to access relevant services and resources within the local community. However, researchers have highlighted limitations with the existing evidence-base, while clinicians express concerns about the quality of onward referral services, liability and upfront investment required. The current article provides a critical review of evidence on social prescribing, drawing on the RE-AIM Framework (Glasgow et al., 1999) to identify questions that will need to be addressed in order to inform both the design and delivery of services and the evolving research agenda around social prescribing. The authors emphasise the need for researchers and planners to work together to develop a more robust evidence-base, advancing understanding of the impacts of social prescribing (on individuals, services and communities), factors associated with variation in outcomes and strategies needed to implement effective and sustainable programmes. They also call on policymakers to recognise the need for investment in allied initiatives to address barriers to engagement in social prescribing programmes, provide targeted support for carers and improve access to older adult mental health services. The article concludes that social prescribing has potential to support older people’s health and wellbeing, but this potential will only be realised through strategic alignment of research, local level implementation and national policy and investment.

Haven: sharing receptive music listening to foster connections and wellbeing for people with dementia who are nearing the end of life, and those who care for them

GARABEDIAN Claire, KELLY Fiona
2020

This paper reports on research exploring the effects of music played for 12 dyads: a care home resident (‘resident’) with dementia and someone closely connected to him/her (‘carer’). Six individualised music interventions (3 live and 3 pre-recorded) were played by the first author on solo cello within five Scottish non-NHS care homes. All interventions were video-recorded. Semi-structured interviews with carer participants, key staff, and managers explored their responses to interventions. Thick descriptions of video recordings and interview transcripts were thematically coded using Nvivo. A key finding was that structural elements of the interventions combined with characteristics of the music played facilitated an internalised experience of ‘haven’; sonically transporting listeners away from their present reality and fulfilling the basic human needs for inclusion, comfort, identity, occupation and attachment.

Social prescribing could empower patients to address non-medical problems in their lives

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2020

This NIHR Alert reports on a review carried out by researchers on the NIHR Evidence Synthesis Working Group to understand how GP social prescribing schemes work and when they are most effective. Researchers reviewed 118 documents evaluating social prescribing schemes and the link worker role in the UK. They found social prescribing schemes increase patients’ confidence, motivation and the skills to manage their own wellbeing - which may reduce their reliance on GPs. These positive outcomes were only achieved when patients, GPs and healthcare managers were clear about the value of social prescribing schemes and when link workers had sufficient time and resources to form a connection with patients, with the voluntary/community sector and with healthcare staff.

British Red Cross 'Support at Home' hospital discharge scheme. A small-scale social care intervention: economic evidence

KNAPP Martin, et al
2019

This case summary presents economic evidence on British Red Cross 'Support at Home' hospital discharge scheme. Through the scheme volunteers offer short-term (4–12 week) practical and emotional support for older people recently discharged from the hospital. A British Red Cross evaluation of the schemes effectiveness identified benefits such as enabling safe discharge, supporting carers and enabling patient advocacy. The intervention costs an average £169 per person, including volunteer time. The programme led to savings from older people needing less help with daily activities and improvements in wellbeing. These savings amounted to £884 per person on average (costs are at 2011 price levels). The summary notes that the quality of evidence on the evaluation was not high due to a lack of control group.

Results 1 - 10 of 177

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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