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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 11 - 20 of 138

Electronic assistive technology for community-dwelling solo-living older adults: a systematic review

SONG Yu, van der CAMMEN Tischa J.M.
2019

The proportion of older adults who live alone in single households is growing continuously. In the care of these solo-living older adults, electronic assistive technology (EAT) can play an important role. The objective of this review is to investigate the effects of EAT on the wellbeing of community-dwelling older adults living alone in single households. A systematic review of English articles was conducted based on PMC, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane database. Additional studies were identified from the references. In total, 16 studies were identified, six of them with follow-up. There is evidence that EAT can improve the physical and mental wellbeing of older adults. There was little evidence that EAT can improve social wellbeing. We conclude that more personalized designs and interventions, and more user engagement could be embedded in the design of EAT for solo-living community-dwelling older adults and that more evidence is needed regarding the effects of those interventions.

How do “robopets” impact the health and well‐being of residents in care homes? A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative evidence

ABBOTT Rebecca, et al
2019

BACKGROUND: Robopets are small animal-like robots which have the appearance and behavioural characteristics of pets. OBJECTIVE(S): To bring together the evidence of the experiences of staff, residents and family members of interacting with robopets and the effects of robopets on the health and well-being of older people living in care homes. DESIGN: Systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research. DATA SOURCES: This study searched 13 electronic databases from inception to July 2018 and undertook forward and backward citation chasing. METHOD(S): Eligible studies reported the views and experiences of robopets from residents, family members and staff (qualitative studies using recognised methods of qualitative data collection and analysis) and the effects of robopets on the health and well-being of care home residents (randomised controlled trials, randomised crossover trials and cluster randomised trials). Study selection was undertaken independently by two reviewers. This study used the Wallace criteria and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool to assess the quality of the evidence. This study developed a logic model with stakeholders and used this as a framework to guide data extraction and synthesis. Where appropriate, meta-analysis were used to combine effect estimates from quantitative studies. RESULT(S): Nineteen studies (10 qualitative, 2 mixed methods and 7 randomised trials) met the inclusion criteria. Interactions with robopets were described as having a positive impact on aspects of well-being including loneliness, depression and quality of life by residents and staff, although there was no corresponding statistically significant evidence from meta-analysis for these outcomes. Meta-analysis showed evidence of a reduction in agitation with the robopet "Paro" compared to control (-0.32 [95% CI -0.61 to -0.04, p = 0.03]). Not everyone had a positive experience of robopets. CONCLUSION(S): Engagement with robopets appears to have beneficial effects on the health and well-being of older adults living in care homes, but not all chose to engage. Whether the benefits can be sustained are yet to be investigated. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Robopets have the potential to benefit people living in care homes, through increasing engagement and interaction. With the robopet acting as a catalyst, this engagement and interaction may afford comfort and help reduce agitation and loneliness.

Agents for change: an evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme

COMMUNITY COUNCIL FOR SOMERSET
2017

An evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme, which aims to reduce isolation and help connect excluded and vulnerable people with services that support them to improve their independence, health and wellbeing. It uses locally based staff who act as first point of contact for people needing information and support. The evaluation, undertaken jointly by South West Forum and Clarity CiC with support from University of Gloucestershire, included analysis of client data, interviews with clients and discussions with locally based staff. Analysis was carried out between October 2016 and February 2017. The results of the evaluation found that the Somerset Village Agents programme is highly regarded by clients, statutory agencies and voluntary and public organisations who have a connection with the programme. It is also helping the most isolated, lonely and vulnerable people in the community, especially older people and those with disabilities and/or long-term health conditions. Areas for potential improvement identified by the evaluation included expanding reach of the programme to reach more younger people and more work to build community capacity. A cost benefit analysis of the programme estimates that for the 21-month period reviewed the Village Agents programme cost £646,000 to deliver and generated £2.5 million in direct savings to the state and a further £2.74 million in wider social value. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Age UK Doncaster Circles project: evaluation report 17/18

CLIFFORD Carol, BOWN Helen
2018

An evaluation of the Circles for Independence in Later Life (CFILL) project in Doncaster, from the period April 2017 to July 2018. Based on the Community Circles model, the project focuses on increasing social engagement, independence and resilience of older people, particularly those at risk of hospitalisation or entry into a care home. The model has been adapted to support older people who have no family or friends or where they don’t want them to be part of the circle. The volunteers becoming part of an older person’s social network or ‘circle’ rather than facilitating others to create one. The evaluation draws on both quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection. The findings show that during the evaluation period 112 people have been involved in the initiative, 76 have had contact with a Circles Connector at Age UK Doncaster, and 40 people out of the 76 who are actively engaged have been matched with a volunteer. The evaluation shows that the project is having a positive impact for those involved towards the four project outcomes: increased confidence in managing long-term health conditions and staying independent; improvements in mental wellbeing; an increase in social connections and less isolation; and benefits for families and volunteers.

An evaluation of Wolverhampton's social prescribing service: a new route to wellbeing

MASSIE Rachel, AHMAD Nahid
2019

An independent evaluation of Wolverhampton social prescribing pilot service, which was launched in 2017 by the Clinical Commissioning Group in collaboration with Wolverhampton Voluntary Sector Council. The evaluation found that the service, which provides a link between primary care services and voluntary and community organisations for those with non-clinical issues, is highly regarded. A total of 676 referrals were received between May 2017 and December 2018. The most common reasons for referral were loneliness and low-level mental health conditions. Link workers made onward referrals to over 150 groups and services. Participants reported a positive impact on mental health, wellbeing, confidence, self-esteem, and even physical health for those who had been referred. The report estimates that Return on Investment means that for every £1 spent on the social prescribing intervention, there will be a saving of £0.15 for primary care services. The researchers recommended further awareness-raising activities, quarterly progress reports and better communication to service users around the nature of the service and wider access, as well as improved data capture.

Wellbeing Service

H4ALL

Hillingdon H4All is a social prescription/wellbeing service that supports patients 65 and over to better manage long term health conditions and social isolation. The service operates as a Community Interest Company (CIC) and is a collaboration between five prominent local third sector charities namely Age UK Hillingdon, Disablement Association Hillingdon (DASH), Harlington Hospice, Hillingdon Carers and Hillingdon Mind and is commissioned by Hillingdon CCG. The service is an augmentation of the former Primary Care Navigator (PCN) project which was managed by Age UK Hillingdon and funded by Hillingdon CCG in 2014. The new service was established in April 2016 and used learning from the former PCN project to provide an enhanced service with the following features:

Being well together: the creation of the Co-op Community Wellbeing Index

HILL-DIXON Amanda, SOLLEY Suzanne, BYNON Radhika
2019

This report presents the Co-op Community Wellbeing Index (CWI), the first measure of community wellbeing at a neighbourhood level across the UK. The index aims to help understand what community wellbeing means to people across the UK and what communities need to help people to get involved and make communities stronger. The report outlines the conceptual model, methodology, and evidence it is based on. Based on the findings from a literature review and research with communities, a model of community wellbeing was developed, which underpins the Community Wellbeing Index. In the model is based on three key pillars: people, place, and relationships. Within these three pillars there are 9 domains of community wellbeing: relationships and trust; equality; voice and participation; health; education and learning; economy, work and employment; culture, leisure and heritage; housing, space and environment; and transport, mobility and connectivity. The complete Index includes an explanation which reflects the aspirations of communities for each domain and related indicators. The report has been written for anybody interested in community wellbeing and will be of particular interest to community sector organisations and practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and funders.

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company, grew out of a commission in 2010-11, in the run up for the Cultural Olympiad 2012, to develop a dance piece with a group of older women. Following the event, a group of women wanted to continue the dance group so Moving Memory was formed. Skipping forward a few years, along with the performance pieces that Moving Memory creates for public events, they also deliver workshops, bespoke participatory projects and training. Moving Memory's vision is for a society where older people live longer, healthier and more fulfilling lives because they participate in artistic, creative and physical activities. The work they produce – and the way they produce it – aims to challenge perceived notions of age and ageing, by asking audiences and participants to look beyond their assumptions and changing attitudes towards older people.

Heritage and wellbeing. The impact of historic places and assets on community wellbeing: a scoping review

PENNINGTON Andy, et al
2019

A scoping review of evidence on the impact of heritage places, interventions, and assets – things like historic objects, monuments or buildings – to discover how they impact individual and community wellbeing. The primary focus of the review was on impacts of historic places and assets set within the ‘living environment’ of communities, but it also considers evidence from projects that used historic objects/artefacts, for example, in the care of people with dementia in care homes and other healthcare settings. The review looked at 75 papers and reports. It found higher and lower quality evidence that historic places, assets and associated activities and interventions can have a wide range of beneficial impacts on the physical, mental and social wellbeing of individuals and communities. These include increased life satisfaction and social connectivity for individuals and positive effects on community wellbeing such as social relationships, sense of belonging, pride of place, ownership and collective empowerment. It also identifies important gaps in the research, and highlights potential negative wellbeing impacts of participating in heritage-based interventions, or living in historic areas. Potential negative impacts of interventions appear to be related to how well the design and delivery of interventions considered the needs of specific individuals and groups.

Evaluation of the H4All Wellbeing Service pilot: April 1st 2016 - January 31st 2017

JAMMU Dalvinder, BOND Andy
2017

An evaluation of the first 10 months of the Hillingdon H4All Wellbeing Service pilot, commissioned by Hillingdon CCG in April 2016. The service is a collaboration between 5 local third sector charities and provides older patients in Hillingdon with a range of services, including: information and advice, practical support, goal setting and ongoing support to manage LTCs, befriending and mentoring, and signposting and referral to voluntary and statutory services. During the evaluation period the H4All service supported 1,099 patients with 2,729 enquiries resulting in 11,675 contacts with/for patients. Analysis of completed Patient Activation Measure (PAM) outcome questionnaires found that most people accessing the service increased their PAM score, with an average movement of 8 points per patient in their individual scores. A total of 44 of the Hillingdon GP practices referred to the Wellbeing Service during the evaluation period in the first ten months and gave very positive feedback. The appendices include individual patient case studies highlight how they have benefitted from the service.

Results 11 - 20 of 138

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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