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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 31 - 40 of 141

Intergeneration activity: how to be a part of it and why. A guide for older people

DUTTON R.
2018

This guide draws on the experience of St Monica's Trust to provide advice on organising intergenerational activities with older and younger people. It outlines why intergenerational activity is so important, looks some of the key physical and mental benefits for older people and children and young people; and how to set up projects and intergenerational activities. It also provides examples of successful projects, including a pilot at the Cote Lane Retirement Village.

Residents as volunteers: final evaluation report

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS, HORNUNG Lisa
2018

An evaluation of the Residents as Volunteers project, which aimed to support older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer and to measure the impact of volunteering on well-being and quality of life. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. A total of 110 residents volunteered during the project. Those participating felt that volunteering had a positive impact on their emotional and social well-being and many also reported that volunteering helped them to stay physically and mentally active. The evaluation identified a number of barriers to volunteering faced by care home residents. These included feeling too old, having a health condition, lack of confidence, narrow views of volunteering or anti-volunteering sentiment. The project also found it was far more difficult to reach residents that had never volunteered before. It also identified barriers for staff and care homes themselves, including existing social interactions, staff to resident ratio, existing volunteering culture and non-supportive environment or lack of management buy-in. The report makes some suggestions to overcome these barriers.

Live music in care: the impact of music interventions for people living and working in care home settings

TAPSON Christine, et al
2018

An evaluation of a music intervention in five care homes in the UK in order to investigate the impact on older residents, staff and the care home environment. The programme, which was delivered by Live Music Now, consisted of an 11-session interactive weekly music programme focussed on singing and the use of voice, and involved training of care staff. For the evaluation, data were drawn from 15 observations of the music sessions, reflective interviews with members of the care teams, staff questionnaires and online questionnaires for those musicians taking part. Thematic analysis of the results identified six themes: the need for collaboration between care home managers, musicians and care staff in delivering music sessions; differing responses to the intervention; empowering the residents and nurturing their identity; the integral part staff, musicians and the researcher played in the success of the intervention and its evaluation; the effect of the intervention on wellbeing; and residents, care staff and managers desire to continue the sessions in the future. The report found that carefully delivered music can provide significant benefits for older people, care staff and care settings, contributing to person-centred care. It found that regular music making can improve the working and living environment for care home residents and staff, and can provide positive social experiences. Music interventions can also play a key role in awakening a sense of identity and empowerment for care home residents. The report makes several recommendations, including that regular participatory music programmes be considered essential for all UK care homes.

Evaluation of the Homeshare pilots: final report

TRAVERSE, MACMILLAN Tarran, et al
2018

The final evaluation report of Homeshare pilots programme (HSP), which looks at what works to develop a sustainable Homeshare scheme. Homeshare schemes bring together older people who need support to stay in their homes, with young people who provide companionship and low level support in return for an affordable place to live. The evaluation, commissioned by SCIE and conducted by Traverse, identifies which approaches and activities work best, barriers to successful schemes, cost and benefits, and identifies factors that to be used by commissioners to assess bids for Homeshare schemes. It draws on qualitative interviews with pilot leads and staff, local authority stakeholders, referral agencies and with householders and homesharers from the first matches achieved in three HSP sites. It covers experiences of living in a Homeshare, operating a sustainable Homeshare scheme, referral and sustainability, and highlights broader learning for the social care and housing sectors. The results show how that Homeshare can reduce loneliness and improve wellbeing by offering companionship and facilitating inter-generational relationships, as well as addressing the lack of affordable housing options. The report concludes that the programme has been successful in supporting the development of Homeshare sites and provided learning in what works in supporting innovation within delivery of social and housing support.

The state of play: Arts and Older People programme

ARTS COUNCIL OF NORTHERN IRELAND
2018

Summary findings on the impact of the Arts and Older People Programme in Northern Ireland, which aims to provide older people with the opportunity to participate in arts activities that contribute to their health and wellbeing. The programme - which is jointly funded by ACNI, the Baring Foundation and the Public Health Agency - targets poverty, isolation and loneliness and provides opportunities for social interaction to help build confidence and resilience. The report provides details of the programme impact against the agreed performance indicators of: isolation and loneliness, social inclusion, poverty, health/dementia, and strengthening the voice of older people. Includes short case study examples of the initiatives.

VCSE sector engagement and social prescribing

VEASEY Phil, NEFF Jennifer, MONK-OZGUL Leeann
2018

This report, commissioned by the Greater London Authority, looks at the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in delivering social prescribing in London and the challenges and opportunities the sector faces. It draws on case studies to highlight good and effective practice and successful partnerships models. It also outlines the resources required in terms of leadership, staff training, fundraising, technological, capacity building and other support to build an effective business case for voluntary and community-sector organisations to engage with social prescribing. The final sections suggest ways to engage voluntary sector organisations in the development and delivery of a social prescribing strategy in London and identifies specific roles for the Mayor and GLA for taking forward social prescribing. The report draws consultation with 100 experts across the VCSE sector, commissioners from the statutory-sector commissioners and representatives of the health and social care sectors.

A systematic review of outdoor recreation (in green space and blue space) for families to promote subjective wellbeing

MANSFIELD Lousie, et al
2018

This systematic review looks at the wellbeing outcomes when taking part in outdoor activities with family. Although there is existing evidence on the benefits being outdoors has for our wellbeing, there is less evidence of the wellbeing benefits when the time is spent with family. The review included empirical research assessing the relationship between outdoor recreation interventions for families and subjective wellbeing, published from 1997 - October 2017 and grey literature published from 2007-2017. The review reports on fifteen studies in total, including two quantitative, one mixed methods (RCT and interviews), and ten qualitative studies. Overall the review found the evidence base was limited with the number of studies and quality, especially for quantitative studies. The evidence from quantitative studies indicates that taking part in outdoor recreation with families has no significant effect on children's quality of life, and has no significant effect on self-esteem and other measures of psychological wellbeing. Initial evidence findings from qualitative studies showed more positive impacts when taking part in outdoor recreation with families, showing improved self-competence learning and identity; improved wellbeing via escapism, relaxation and sensory experience; and improved social bonding as a family. Analysis of survey data found that people's enjoyment of the outdoors is enhanced when they are spending time with family and friends, and in particular with partners.

Living well for longer: the economic argument for investing in the health and wellbeing of older people in Wales

EDWARDS Rhiannon Tudor, et al
2018

This report, commissioned by Public Health Wales, explores the economic case for investing in older people in Wales to support people to live longer in good health in older age. It looks at investing in older people as assets, highlighting the importance of their contribution to the economy in Wales and the importance of housing and enabling independence in later life. It then draws on the results of rapid reviews of international and UK evidence to show the relative cost-effectiveness and return on investment on preventing loneliness and social isolation; caring for older carers; and preventing falls. It concludes that enabling people to work for longer, facilitating volunteering and supporting working parents through care of grandchildren brings many economic returns in terms of improving wellbeing; reducing loneliness, and supporting formal and wider community services. In addition co-production enables older people to remain active in the community and provides intergenerational benefits within the community and public sector services. The report concludes that Wales should focus investment on: fully integrated health and care services; maintaining physical and mental well being in older age, with a focus on reducing social isolation and loneliness; maintaining services to promote prevention (particularly falls prevention), rehabilitation and reablement; investment in sustainable homes, transport and communities; and support for informal carers.

Health 2020 priority area four: creating supportive environments and resilient communities: a compendium of inspirational examples


2018

Brings together innovative examples of actions taken in 13 countries to strengthen resilience and build supportive environments for population health and well-being. The examples show how building resilience can be achieved by developing and sustaining partnerships between institutions and communities; by community action and bottom-up efforts; at system level, both nationally and locally. The examples, primarily gathered from community initiatives, are linked to the four types of resilience capacities: adaptive, absorptive, anticipatory and transformative. Topics covered include the role of resilience building in addressing human rights, health inequities, environmental hazards, and health-related topics such as communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Examples from the UK include: Promoting social connections and community networks for older people through Better in Sheffield; Supporting local systems to tackle the social determinants of health inequalities; Strengthening resilience through the early intervention and prevention: breaking the generational cycle of crime project; and A social movement for health and resilience in Blackburn with Darwen. Each example attempts to describe: the action undertaken; the resilience-related issue that the action aimed to address; and the impact and lessons learnt in the process of strengthening resilience.

Evaluation of Re:Connect and Time and Space peer mentoring projects: April 2014-August 2017

MacGREGOR Aisha, CAMERON Julie
2018

Outlines the main findings an evaluation of a mental health carers peer mentoring project, which delivered peer mentoring services across two sites: RE: Connect in Glasgow and Time and Space in Stirling and Clackmannanshire. The project aimed to enable mental health carers receiving peer mentoring to be better supported and have better mental health and wellbeing, and for peer mentors have improved skills and wellbeing. It involved training for peer mentors, an outreach programme to promote the project to professionals and the general public, and learning events to raise profile of mental health carers. The evaluation draws on interviews and surveys conducted with mentees, mentors, volunteers, staff members, and referral agencies. It looks at the successes and challenges experienced by the project. Case studies also provide an insight into the experience and impact of peer mentoring for both mentors and mentees. It reports that over three years, 109 individuals engaged with the project across both sites as mentors (n= 53), mentees (n=44), or volunteers (n=12). The training provided was particularly successful and helped to strengthen confidence and prepare individuals for the mentoring role and mentees also valued being supported by someone who had occupied a caring role. Challenges included the recruitment of mentees, despite direct advertising and outreach work. Overall, the project was successful, demonstrating the potential of the peer mentoring model for future provision.

Results 31 - 40 of 141

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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