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Results for 'young adults'

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A qualitative evidence review of place and space, intangible assets and volunteering and participatory arts and sport or physical activity for enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness across the adult lifecourse (16+ years)

MANSFIELD Louise, et al
2020

This review identifies evidence on the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review looked at studies published worldwide between 2009 and 2019, found 59 sources. The qualitative studies included focus on understanding and conceptualising place and space, wellbeing and/or loneliness in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. In these studies, five key thematic areas and their findings have been identified: (i) belonging and identity in place and space (ii) places and spaces of community and locality, (iii) therapeutic and sensory spaces, (iv) safe spaces and (v) temporal aspects of place and space. These themes point to processes by which participatory arts and sport operate to enhance wellbeing and/or alleviate loneliness. Based on the findings, the review has high confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing and potentially alleviating loneliness by creating a positive sense of belonging and identity, community and therapeutic or sensory experience in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing by creating safe spaces for those facing physical or emotional harm via participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that the pattern and timing of activities in places and spaces for participatory arts, sport or physical activity i.e. when, how long, who with and what types of activity occur, have a positive influence of wellbeing.

Together in the 2020s: twenty ideas for creating a Britain for all ages by 2030

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2020

This report presents 20 innovative ideas to bring older and younger people together and create a stronger society. The ideas cover three areas of public life: practical intergenerational projects, social and economic policies, and culture, media and sport. The report also highlights how intergenerational projects can change attitudes, improve older people’s health and care, tackle loneliness and increase trust and understanding between generations. The ideas include enabling more care homes to become community hubs; extending schools’ opening hours to provide community spaces for intergenerational activities; scaling up homesharing schemes for older and younger people; and the creation of a government department to join up and support intergenerational action. The recommendations draw on contributions from 25 national and local organisations.

North London Cares and South London Cares

North London Cares and South London Cares

North London Cares (NLC) and South London Cares (SLC) are community networks mobilising young professionals to volunteer to spend time with and support their older neighbours in Camden and Islington (NLC) and Lambeth and Southwark (SLC), in order to reduce loneliness and isolation amongst older people (and young professionals alike); to improve the skills, confidence, wellbeing and resilience so that all participants can better navigate the rapidly changing modern world; and to reduce the division across social and generational divides in London.

Taking on and taking over: choice and control for physically disabled young adults

MITCHELL Wendy, et al
2015

Summarises the findings of a study on approaches to supporting physically disabled young adults to achieve their preferred levels of control over care and support arrangements. The study took place between July 2012 and January 2014 and involved semi-structured interviews with young adults, parents and social care professionals. It examined physically disabled young adults experiences of managing their care and support arrangements and explored how they can be better supported. Key findings and practice implications are included. While welcoming the opportunities afforded by personalised approaches within adult social care, almost all the young adults described feeling daunted by the associated responsibilities, with managing personal assistants/carers consistently identified as the most difficult aspect of having a Direct Payment. Young adults found information from statutory services was typically targeted at other audiences, for example, older people and only a minority believed transition planning/support services had played a significant role in preparing them for taking on a Personal Budget. Social workers with more experience of working with young adults identified specific issues that need to be accommodated including: young adults’ relative lack of life skills and experience; young adults’ preferences regarding parental involvement; and addressing parents’ support needs.

Results 1 - 4 of 4

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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