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Results for 'young people'

Results 1 - 10 of 10

A qualitative evidence review of place and space, intangible assets and volunteering and participatory arts and sport or physical activity for enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness across the adult lifecourse (16+ years)

MANSFIELD Louise, et al
2020

This review identifies evidence on the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review looked at studies published worldwide between 2009 and 2019, found 59 sources. The qualitative studies included focus on understanding and conceptualising place and space, wellbeing and/or loneliness in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. In these studies, five key thematic areas and their findings have been identified: (i) belonging and identity in place and space (ii) places and spaces of community and locality, (iii) therapeutic and sensory spaces, (iv) safe spaces and (v) temporal aspects of place and space. These themes point to processes by which participatory arts and sport operate to enhance wellbeing and/or alleviate loneliness. Based on the findings, the review has high confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing and potentially alleviating loneliness by creating a positive sense of belonging and identity, community and therapeutic or sensory experience in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing by creating safe spaces for those facing physical or emotional harm via participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that the pattern and timing of activities in places and spaces for participatory arts, sport or physical activity i.e. when, how long, who with and what types of activity occur, have a positive influence of wellbeing.

Hear and now: the impact of an intergenerational arts and health project on participant wellbeing

JENKINS Lindsay, FARRER Rachel, AUJLA Imogen
2020

This research explores the impact that an intergenerational arts and health project can have upon wellbeing, with a particular focus on the benefits that intergenerational practice can provide in relation to quality of life, affect, and social inclusion. It is based on Hear and Now, an award-winning, intergenerational community arts project developed by the Philharmonia Orchestra and Orchestras Live in Bedford, which brought together older adults living with dementia and young people. The study looked at the impact on the participant end users, and also the experiences of their carers and the artists and support staff who facilitated the project. Data were collected through observations of the workshops and focus groups. Researchers used the PERMA model of wellbeing to reflect on the impact of the project. The results found that participants reported: many positive emotions; a high level of engagement; the creation of positive relationships and new connections; that the project had meaning and that they felt of value; and an overall sense of achievement and accomplishment. The findings highlight the holistic impact of intergenerational arts and its ability to create a sense of belonging and purpose that unites different sectors of the community. The report also highlights key learning for future projects.

Together in the 2020s: twenty ideas for creating a Britain for all ages by 2030

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2020

This report presents 20 innovative ideas to bring older and younger people together and create a stronger society. The ideas cover three areas of public life: practical intergenerational projects, social and economic policies, and culture, media and sport. The report also highlights how intergenerational projects can change attitudes, improve older people’s health and care, tackle loneliness and increase trust and understanding between generations. The ideas include enabling more care homes to become community hubs; extending schools’ opening hours to provide community spaces for intergenerational activities; scaling up homesharing schemes for older and younger people; and the creation of a government department to join up and support intergenerational action. The recommendations draw on contributions from 25 national and local organisations.

The intergenerational evaluation toolkit

JARROTT Shannon
2019

Intergenerational shared sites and intergenerational programmes that bring younger and older generations together can have many positive benefits. This Toolkit provides three resources to support programme providers and researchers to demonstrate the impact of intergenerational programming and the practices which achieve outcomes. The toolkit includes an Intergenerational Practice Evaluation tool to evaluate single intergenerational activities and the impact of programmes over time; a guide to planning an intergenerational evaluation; and a list of reliable outcome measures. The toolkit has been developed following 15 years of collaborative innovative practice and evaluation research.

Healing the generational divide: interim report on intergenerational connection

ALL-PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON SOCIAL INTEGRATION
2019

Interim report of the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Social Integration inquiry on intergenerational connection, which examines the current gap between older and younger people, and what can be done to bridge it. The report sets out a series of suggestions to bring people of all ages and backgrounds together under four main policy areas: community projects and initiatives; public services; housing and planning; and technology. The report highlights how intergenerational projects are particularly effective in achieving social integration, improving wellbeing and tackling loneliness. It also includes examples of successful initiatives It highlights the benefits of taking a whole-society approach, including all policy areas and involving national and local government, not-for-profit organisations, the private sector and academia. Specific recommendations include: for nurseries, schools and care homes to foster connections between the different generations who use their services and, where possible, to co-locate services on one site and the creation of a national volunteering scheme that encourages older people to volunteer in their communities when they retire.

Let's Dance! How dance improves physical and mental health: a briefing for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

This briefing provides examples to show some of the ways that dance is being used to improve people's physical and mental wellbeing across Wales. The initiatives include: Movement for Stroke Rehabilitation, delivered in partnership with Cardiff and Vale University Health Board (UHB) and Rubicon Dance; Breakin’ for Better Mental Health, which involves both breakdancing and rap music as expressive art forms to improve young people’s emotional and mental health; Dance for Parkinson’s; Dance to Health, a falls prevention project for older people been developed by Aesop and Swansea Bay UHBat Swansea Bay UHB. The examples show how dance initiatives can support the prevention agenda by helping people stay active and healthy outside of traditional health and social care settings.

Review of key mechanisms in intergenerational practices, and their effectiveness at reducing loneliness/social isolation

BRYER Nia, OWNES Janine
2019

This review examines enablers and barriers to successful intergenerational activities and interventions effectiveness at reducing loneliness and social isolation. It also examines whether there are particular subgroups for whom intergenerational programmes are particularly effective. The review was carried out by researchers at OB3 Research and the Centre for Loneliness Studies at University of Sheffield. It included a literature review, and field work to identify intergenerational interventions and case studies from Wales and the wider UK. The review identified a range of interventions from low level interventions such as raising awareness of ageing issues through to high level intervention where intergenerational activities are embedded into community settings. The findings also indicate that intergenerational practice does more to reduce social isolation and lack of social connections than loneliness. The review identified different benefits for the three groups involved - children/young people, adults and older people. The review also identified a number of enablers that contribute to effective operation of IP (e.g. a visionary leader, a focused perspective) and barriers that hinder action (e.g. time, planning, logistics). The review makes eight recommendations for the Welsh Government to consider in terms of future policy relating to intergenerational practice.

Intergeneration activity: how to be a part of it and why. A guide for older people

DUTTON R.
2018

This guide draws on the experience of St Monica's Trust to provide advice on organising intergenerational activities with older and younger people. It outlines why intergenerational activity is so important, looks some of the key physical and mental benefits for older people and children and young people; and how to set up projects and intergenerational activities. It also provides examples of successful projects, including a pilot at the Cote Lane Retirement Village.

Mixing matters: how shared sites can bring older and younger people together and unite Brexit Britain

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2018

Sets out why increasing connections between generations is key to the health, wellbeing and future of individuals, communities and the country. While Britain has become more age segregated in recent decades, this paper demonstrates there is a growing movement to tackle ‘age apartheid’. The paper focuses on how older and younger people can come together through ‘shared sites’ with many inspiring and practical examples that could be replicated across the UK. Four specific themes are explored: shared care and play; shared housing and living; shared learning and work; and shared community spaces and activities. The paper sets out an ambition to develop 500 shared sites by 2022, arguing that with some 75,000 care homes, nurseries and schools in the UK, there is massive scope for the shared sites challenge to achieve much more.

Measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people

BRYANT Gillian, HEARD Heather, WATSON Jo
2015

This document outlines the importance of measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people. It is intended to provide guidance on the use of targeted, evidence driven intelligence and practical support to those wishing to develop local joint strategic needs assessments (JSNAs) and the evaluation of interventions which improve the mental wellbeing of children and young people. In particular, the briefing examines what children and young people’s mental wellbeing is, and why is it important; it describes some of the tools which are currently available to measure mental wellbeing and identify its determinants; it discusses risk and protective factors; and explains how using intelligence can improve children and young people’s outcomes. The technical appendix has measures to quantify mental wellbeing and its determinants, information on using the measures and links to examples of evidence based practice.

Results 1 - 10 of 10

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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