COVID-19 resources

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Children's rights during coronavirus: children's views and experiences

Eurochild

Findings of a survey a survey designed with children and for children aged between 8 to 17 years, to better understand the impact of the pandemic. More than 26,000 children participated worldwide and an additional 5,000 responded to a shorter poll on issues of protection, safety and peer-to-peer support, disseminated via UNICEF’s U-Report. Key findings include: 61% of children said they were getting a better education before the pandemic; 56% shared they got less chances to talk to their friends; 41% said their family struggled financially during the pandemic; 38% said their governments do not listen to children when making decisions on the pandemic; 17% of children aged between 13 and 17 felt the portrayal of children in the media had gotten worse since the start of the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

Homeless and forgotten: surviving lockdown in temporary accommodation

Shelter England.

This research reveals the total number of people who spent lockdown in temporary accommodation, and shares the experiences of over 20 households who told us what it was like to be homeless in a pandemic. Temporary accommodation (TA) is the name given to the accommodation that is often offered to people who seek help from their council as they are homeless, eligible for help and owed ‘a rehousing duty’. The report starts by setting out new findings on the number of people who were living in temporary accommodation during lockdown. It then describes what it is like to live in temporary accommodation, before moving on to people’s experience of lockdown and the impact it had on them. It then sets out the changes needed to ensure that, as life gets back to normal, everybody has the right to a safe home. There were over a quarter of a million (253,620) homeless people living in temporary accommodation in England during the first national lockdown This works out as an estimated 1 in 222 people were homeless and living in temporary accommodation. Families, especially single parent households, are overrepresented among homeless people in temporary accommodation. During the lockdown, people in TA found it difficult to keep safe due to physical proximity; to meet lockdown rules and stay safe; and to meet basic needs. Almost all (20 out of 21) of the interviewees said that their or their partner’s mental health had been negatively affected by living in TA. Most people (20 out of 21) also reported that their or their partner’s physical health had also been negatively affected by living in the accommodation. Children experienced a negative impact on education and development; lack of safe space to play; impact on mental health and behaviour; impact on physical health.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

Still here for children: sharing the experiences of NSPCC staff who supported children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

This report explores how NSPCC have staff adapted their ways of working to enable them to continue to support children and families during the pandemic; what they have learnt about the needs of children and families; and how they felt about the new ways of working. Fifteen NSPCC staff members working in a variety of frontline and strategic roles in our Together for Childhood sites in Glasgow, Plymouth and Stoke participated in this project. During lockdown, they were asked to complete three fortnightly reflective diary entries, to consider their experiences of supporting children and families over the preceding two weeks. Key learning includes: working online enabled planned work to continue but created new barriers to access for some families; working together with partners helped NSPCC staff respond to the needs of local communities; financial insecurity left families in need of basic essentials; staff felt that children were more at risk of experiencing abuse at home and online; reduced opportunities for face-to-face contact made it more challenging to assess risk and safeguard children; mental health declined among children and young people, resulting in an increased need for support services; separation of children in care from their birth parents created challenges around contact; working from home created concerns about confidentiality and exposing family members to the content of their work; lack of face-to-face contact with children, families and colleagues had a negative impact on staff wellbeing. Overall, data from the reflective diary entries indicate that staff felt lockdown restrictions had a detrimental impact on children and families.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

Coronavirus: 75% of social workers feeling more negative about their work-life than last year, survey finds

Community Care

Community Care survey captures pandemic's harsh impact, with 70% of practitioners reporting worsening mental health while majorities say size and complexity of workload have increased as need mounts. 92% felt the period since the start of the first national lockdown in March had driven increased levels of need among people they support, taking into account changes to society as a whole and to social work practice. 65% were satisfied with how their service had responded and adapted to the ongoing pandemic context, including via implementing practice changes. More than eight in 10 social workers said they were still home working by default and were using technology to replace meetings and visits.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

COVID-19 infection prevention and control guidance for family and friends (informal carers) who support people in their own homes

Health Service Executive

This guidance has been developed to help carers and people who are cared for on how to protect each other from COVID-19. It is also intended to help healthcare workers who advise people who provide care about how to keep safe from infection. It sets out the steps that carers need to take before and during their visit to the person they care for.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): adult care home visitor testing guidance

Scottish Government

Coronavirus (COVID-19) adult care home visitor testing guidance which forms part of the Test and Protect Pathways Programme. The Scottish Government’s COVID-19 Test and Protect Pathways Programme has expanded testing to include care home visitors. Currently this is aimed at designated visitors, i.e. a family member or friend chosen by the resident to visit them indoors. This webpage contains guidance and materials to support care homes to implement visitor testing.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): adult care homes guidance

Scottish Government

This guidance sets out how care home visiting may be gradually increased while minimising risks to residents, staff and visitors. There are two main sets of guidance for care homes, focussed on resuming: visiting by friends and family; visits into the home by volunteers, spiritual/faith representatives and professionals; wellbeing activities. The guidance recommends care homes take a staged approach to resuming visiting. In addition, the guidance sets out actions to mitigate risks to residents, visitors and staff. For all care homes, regardless of Covid status, essential visits should be generously supported where possible to do so safely, without a defined time limit.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

The challenges of COVID‐19 for people with dementia with Lewy bodies and family caregivers

International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Commentary. During the current SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic dementia has been identified as disproportionally common in adults aged over 65 who develop severe COVID‐19. This perspective makes three key points: the physical, cognitive and neuropsychiatric challenges associated with dementia with Lewy bodies make people particularly vulnerable to COVID‐19; adverse effects may also occur from social isolation, the under‐treatment of existing DLB related symptoms/problems and the negative impact on caregivers and; a vigilant multi‐disciplinary approach is needed to meet the health and psychosocial needs of people with DLB and support family caregivers.

Last updated on hub: 21 December 2020

Adherence of home‐based Wu Qin Xi programs during the COVID‐19 epidemic in Shanghai

International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Details of an exercise intervention published in a letter to the editor. Home‐based exercise programs are widely accepted to improve immunity and prevent infection at home. In the COVID‐19 epidemic particular situation, home‐based exercise programs play a key part in immunity enhancement as well as infection prevention. Authorities selected the Wu Qin Xi (WQX) exercises program because it can can improve the cognitive function, anxiety, depression, sleeping, and balance ability in elderly people. This study investigated the exercise adherence with a sample of 1500 participants. Findings: An important component facilitating the optimal effectiveness of exercise programs is a high level of exercise adherence. Conclusion: is that WQX exercise program was found to be an home‐exercise program that achieves high adherence in elderly adults who lived in these communities during outbreak of the COVID‐19 epidemic in Shanghai.

Last updated on hub: 21 December 2020

Stress‐buffering role of social support during COVID‐19

Family Process

In order to reduce the high infection rate of COVID‐19, individuals began to engage in self‐isolation amid a time of uncertainty and worry. Given that social support can be protective against the negative effects of distress on mental and physical health, the lack of support may negatively impact individuals during their self‐isolation. Thus, the current study examined the role of self‐isolation on feelings of stress, the perception and reception of social support, and mental health problems during the COVID‐19 pandemic. A sample of 405 college students were asked to report on the amount of self‐isolation in which they were engaging, worry about COVID‐19, psychological health, and received and perceived social support. Results indicated that when the length of time in self‐isolation was taken into account, perceived social support buffered the connection between worry about COVID‐19 and psychological health. These results indicate that social support, worry about COVID‐19, and self‐isolation may influence individuals’ psychological health during times of stress.

Last updated on hub: 21 December 2020