COVID-19 resources

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Provider Hubs - Hertfordshire County Council

Hertfordshire County Council

Hertfordshire County Council has rapidly set up a ‘provider hub’ to support its near 800 social care providers. The Hub is jointly run by Hertfordshire County Council and Hertfordshire Care Providers Association to provide professional advice and support to all care organisations working in the frontline in the fight against COVID-19. The Hub is also the central point for collecting and providing key information and data for the adult social care board and supports the many direct payment holders who can contact directly to get advice about their direct payments and the flexibility the council can support them with.The full case study can be found in the Department for Health and Social Care action plan which is linked to this item and was published on 15 April 2020.

Last updated on hub: 22 July 2020

Providing care and support at home to people who have had COVID-19

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Quick guide to help home care workers and personal assistants (PAs) to provide care and support to people who have left hospital after having COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 03 November 2020

Providing person-centred support for residents living with dementia who need to be isolated in care homes during the COVID-19 crisis

Association for Dementia Studies, University of Worcester

This information sheet supports care homes catering for people living with dementia during the COVID-19 pandemic. The document covers a range of strategies to help a person living with dementia understand the COVID-19 situation; to create an inviting isolation space; to help occupy the person in an isolation space; to use the environment to encourage isolation; to meet people’s need for human contact; and to encourage a person to comply with infection control requirements. It brings together current best practice, setting out general advice only. Each resident should be assessed on an ongoing and individual basis to find the best response and the latest national sector guidance should be followed.

Last updated on hub: 24 June 2020

Psychosocial impact of COVID-19 nursing home restrictions on visitors of residents with cognitive impairment: a cross-sectional study as part of the engaging remotely in care (ERiC) project

Research published in Frontiers in Psychiatry by O'Caoimh, R. et al., October 2020. Background: COVID-19 has disproportionately affected older people. Visiting restrictions introduced since the start of the pandemic in residential care facilities (RCFs) may impact negatively on visitors including close family, friends, and guardians. This study examined the effects of COVID-19 visiting restrictions on measures of perceived loneliness, well-being, and carer quality of life (QoL) amongst visitors of residents with and without cognitive impairment (CI) in Irish RCFs. Methods: This study created a cross-sectional online survey. Loneliness was measured with the UCLA brief loneliness scale, psychological well-being with the WHO-5 Well-being Index and carer QoL with the Adult Carer QoL Questionnaire (support for caring subscale). Satisfaction with care (“increased/same” and “decreased”) was measured. A history of CI was reported by respondents. Sampling was by convenience with the link circulated through university mail lists and targeted social media accounts for 2 weeks in June 2020. Results: In all, 225 responses were included of which 202 noted whether residents had reported CI. Most of the 202 identified themselves as immediate family (91%) and as female (82%). The majority (67%) were aged between 45 and 64 years. Most (80%) reported that their resident had CI. Approximately one-third indicated reduced satisfaction (27%) or that restrictions had impaired communication with nursing home staff (38%). Median loneliness scores were 4/9, well-being scores 60/100 and carer QoL scores 10/15. Visitors of those with CI reported significantly lower well-being (p = 0.006) but no difference in loneliness (p = 0.114) or QoL (p = 0.305). Reported CI (p = 0.04) remained an independent predictors of lower WHO-5 scores, after adjusting for age, sex, RCF location, and dementia stage (advanced), satisfaction with care (reduced), and perception of staff support measured on the Adult Carer QoL Questionnaire. Conclusion: This survey suggests that many RCF visitors experienced low psychosocial and emotional well-being during the COVID-19 lockdown. Visitors of residents with CI report significantly poorer well-being as measured by the WHO-5 than those without. Additional research is required to understand the importance of disrupted caregiving roles resulting from visiting restrictions on well-being, particularly on visitors of residents with CI and how RCFs and their staff can support visitors to mitigate these.

Last updated on hub: 18 November 2020

Psychosocial impact on frontline health and social care professionals in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative interview study

BMJ Open

Objectives To explore the psychosocial well-being of health and social care professionals working during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design This was a qualitative study deploying in-depth, individual interviews, which were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used for coding. Participants This study involved 25 participants from a range of frontline professions in health and social care. Setting Interviews were conducted over the phone or video call, depending on participant preference. Results From the analysis, this study identified 5 overarching themes: communication challenges, work-related stressors, support structures, personal growth and individual resilience. The participants expressed difficulties such as communication challenges and changing work conditions, but also positive factors such as increased team unity at work, and a greater reflection on what matters in life. Conclusions This study provides evidence on the support needs of health and social care professionals amid continued and future disruptions caused by the pandemic. It also elucidates some of the successful strategies (such as mindfulness, hobbies, restricting news intake, virtual socialising activities) deployed by health and social care professionals that can support their resilience and well-being and be used to guide future interventions.

Last updated on hub: 15 March 2021

Public health and human rights: ‘valuable people at risk’

National Mental Capacity Forum

This webinar explores what it means to get the balance right between protecting public health and respecting the human rights of vulnerable people in the context of COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Public health annual report 2021: rising to the challenges of COVID-19

Local Government Association

This year's annual report looks back at what public health has helped to achieve and what could have been done better during the pandemic. It also looks to the future – the new UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), the publication of the Department of Health and Social Care's (DHSC) white paper, and the significant organisational changes these could bring. The report describes some of the main themes emerging from work on the pandemic and summarises key priorities which have implications for the future of public health, and the task of building back fairer.

Last updated on hub: 12 April 2021

Public mental health and wellbeing and Covid-19

Local Government Association

This briefing provides advice for Directors of Public Health about the public mental health and wellbeing issues arising from the Covid-19 outbreak. Directors of Public Health are leading the local public mental health and wellbeing response. It includes a diagram which shows potential mental health impacts of COVID-19 across the life course. It highlights potential short term (for the duration of the epidemic), medium-term (2 year) and long-term impacts, which could result in increased demand on the NHS and local government. The briefing also outlines key principles of local responses, which include; whole system approaches, with agencies working together; interventions targeting the whole population, as well as those at risk; and building on existing programmes and initiatives that promote wellbeing.

Last updated on hub: 21 May 2020

Put relationships at the heart of recovery and fuse social and economic policies

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

Mentoring charity MCR Pathways’ founder reflects on the radical impact lockdown has had on care-experienced and other disadvantaged young people in Scotland. In partnerships with local authorities and schools, the MCR model is helping implement a long-term system and cultural change within Scottish education, to ensure an equality of education outcomes, job choices and subsequent life chances. Following school closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the charity surveyed more than 1,000 young people to ascertain the impact on their wellbeing, ability to learn and thoughts on returning to school and their futures. The article explores the challenges highlighted by the research and the solutions needed to address those concerns. With young people driving each conclusion, the author proposes his recommendations for recovery, equality and growth and how those affected need to be central to all decisions. Not just for social policy but in a required fusing with economic policy.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Putting children first in future lockdowns

Children’s Commissioner for England

Sets out the key actions needed to ensure children are at the heart of planning for any future coronavirus lockdowns. The briefing focuses on a range of aspects and settings, including education, early years, mental health, play and activity, online harms, housing, children’s social care, and secure settings. It sets out ten principles that should guide any policy and action, arguing that children’s perspectives must be better reflected in scientific and public health advice; education should be prioritised over other sectors; full lockdowns must balance the epidemiological benefit to children against the social and health costs to children of closures to schools, leisure/youth centres and other facilities; any rights extended to adults must also be given to children in ways that work for them (e.g., right to exercise outdoor); communication about the lockdown must make clear that risk of infection should not prevent children and families seeking help they need, such as urgent healthcare which is not related to the virus or refuge from domestic abuse. The briefing also argues that more specific guidance is needed for children’s homes and further guidance should be issued to local authorities to prioritise the safeguarding of vulnerable children during any future lockdown, including those who do not currently have a social worker. Local authorities should also be working with local partners to proactively identify children who become vulnerable during the lockdown, including in families where domestic abuse may have arisen or increased or where parental substance misuse or mental health problems have escalated.

Last updated on hub: 11 August 2020

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