COVID-19 resources

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Reflections on practice during a pandemic: how do we continue to ensure effective communication during the COVID‐19 pandemic?

Child Abuse Review

This report sets out the reflections of a practice mentor to social workers across the Children and Families Service in Gwynedd on how communication has been affected in social work due to the pandemic. As part of the Effective Child Protection Project, the role involves offering individual and group support, and reflective opportunities to social workers. The paper explains how practice and communication has changed and adapted to respond to the challenges posed by the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 21 January 2021

Reflections on practice during a pandemic: how do we continue to ensure effective communication during the COVID‐19 pandemic?

Child Abuse Review

Personal reflection of a social worker who began a role in the Effective Child Protection Project as a practice mentor to social workers across the Children and Families Service in Gwynedd, in April 2019. This report considers the authors reflections on how communication has been affected in social work due to the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

Reflections on social work 2020 under Covid-19 online magazine

Social Work Education (The International Journal)

Social Work 2020 under Covid-19 was a free online magazine conceived just before the UK’s Covid-19 full lockdown began, in late March 2020. It ran for five editions until 14 July 2020. In this time it published close to 100 articles from academics, people with lived experience, practitioners and students. It contained a far higher proportion of submissions from the last three groups of contributors than traditional journals. This article draws on the six-person editorial collective’s reflections on the magazine: it considers its founding purposes; its role in fostering social work community, utilizing an adaptation of social capital classifications; and its potential as a learning tool. It concludes by arguing that the magazine illustrates the potential for free online publications to be an important emergent vehicle for ‘everyday activism’ within the field of social work.

Last updated on hub: 12 November 2020

Reflections on social work 2020 under Covid-19 online magazine

Social Work Education (The International Journal)

Social Work 2020 under Covid-19 was a free online magazine conceived just before the UK’s Covid-19 full lockdown began, in late March 2020. It ran for five editions until 14 July 2020. In this time it published close to 100 articles from academics, people with lived experience, practitioners and students. It contained a far higher proportion of submissions from the last three groups of contributors than traditional journals. This article draws on the six-person editorial collective’s reflections on the magazine: it considers its founding purposes; its role in fostering social work community, utilizing an adaptation of social capital classifications; and its potential as a learning tool. It concludes by arguing that the magazine illustrates the potential for free online publications to be an important emergent vehicle for ‘everyday activism’ within the field of social work.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Reflections on virtual group work with transgender and gender diverse youth during the pandemic

Social Work with Groups

This narrative offers reflections by three different group workers, all colleagues at Boston Children’s Hospital with various levels of group work experience. Their aim is to share with readers the story of their work in virtual psychotherapy groups with transgender and gender diverse (TGD) youth during the COVID-19 pandemic. They address the rationale for providing virtual groups for this population, offer sound recommendations on how to create safety in virtual groups, and share their insights on moving beyond isolation and division to connection, acceptance, unity, and intimacy through a virtual format during this unprecedented time of crisis.

Last updated on hub: 20 March 2021

Reimagining the future of health and social care: how to learn the lessons from the Covid-19 crisis for a next generation health and care system

Royal Society of Arts

This report considers how the lessons from the Covid-19 crisis can help inform and shape the transformation of the health and social care system in England. The pandemic has acted as a real-time experiment of the capacity of the health and care system, highlighting the need for: greater connection between health and social care systems, social care on an equal footing with health care, agile and adaptive leadership, clear public health messaging, greater professional autonomy, addressing health inequality, digital access and literacy, flexible access to resources, including local and community assets, and effective deployment of new technology and data insights to support efficient responses. The paper explores three feasible scenarios for change: pandemic NHS – all health and social care activities are pivoted to ensure that as and when another pandemic hits, the NHS can respond effectively and efficiently; system stasis – returning the health and social care system to normal is the critical activity; and care horizons – a greater period of reflection and review of what happened during the pandemic leads to far greater integration between health and social care. The report explores how to take the best elements from these very different scenarios and recommends both immediate actions to build on the successes in responding to the pandemic and a national process of deliberative engagement with embedded consent amongst professionals, people with lived experience and the public more widely as a foundation for a new health and care settlement for England.

Last updated on hub: 13 July 2020

Relational lockdown and relational trauma in the time of coronavirus: a reflection from a UK family therapist

Family Process

Like a meteor hitting the earth’s surface, 44, 131 unexpected deaths have shaken, disturbed, and saddened the core of our nation. This reflection considers the consequences of the coronavirus crisis in the UK with particular reference to the impact on families and on the practice of family therapists. The perspective presented can only be partial because of the fast‐changing situation and the limited access to alternative perspectives that are available during this period of relational lockdown. The author provides a systemic understanding of what has happened and what is happening.

Last updated on hub: 14 October 2020

Relationships and resilience in the time of the Coronavirus

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

The Why Not? Trust for Care Experienced Young People is a charity set up in 2018, to support long term connections and relationships between young people with care experience and the people who matter to them. As well as individual connections, the Why Not? Trust is supporting young people, including young parents with care experience to develop their own community networks. These networks allow young people to access experiences and events which give opportunities they may not be able to access on their own. Their approach is based on a belief in being defined by relationships. The COVID-19 lockdown presented a challenge to relational engagements which are contingent upon being able to interact. Despite their fears they have managed to cope. The online world provided a way of maintaining contact and providing support with young care experienced adults. The experiences of the past few months helped the Trust better understand the causes of isolation and exclusion, but also to appreciate more than ever the value of human relationships.

Last updated on hub: 27 November 2020

Relationships and resilience in the time of the Coronavirus

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

Coming together as a community is an important function for members of The Why Not? Trust, a charity which supports long term connections and relationships between young people with care experience and the people who matter to them. These networks allow young people to access experiences and events which give opportunities they may not be able to access on their own. Their approach is based on a belief in being defined by relationships. The COVID-19 lockdown presented a challenge to relational engagements which are contingent upon being able to interact. Despite their fears they have managed to cope. The online world provided a way of maintaining contact and providing support with young care experienced adults. The experiences of the past few months helped the Trust better understand the causes of isolation and exclusion, but also to appreciate more than ever the value of human relationships.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Re-making state-civil society relationships during the COVID 19 pandemic? An English perspective

People Place and Policy Online

State and civil society have had a complicated and inter-twined relationship for many years and this has arguably never been more evident than during the COVID 19 pandemic. This review article discusses how this relationship played out locally and nationally during the early months of the pandemic from an English perspective to consider whether we have witnessed an extension of pre-existing roles or a re-making of new ones. At a national level we identify the exacerbation of pre-existing adversarial relationships focussed on the scale and necessity of the government’s financial support package for civil society organisations (CSOs). At the local level we observe an extension of prior complementary relationships, with CSOs further embedded in local systems of decision making, co-ordination and service provision. This paper also identifies a newly visible and increasingly complementary local role for previously supplementary community-led CSOs responding to the needs of vulnerable citizens. It is unclear if the next phase of the pandemic will affect these relationships yet further, or whether these configurations will be preserved following the COVID-19 crisis, but it seems certain that the crisis will have a lasting effect on national and local state-civil society interactions in one way or another.

Last updated on hub: 01 February 2021

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