COVID-19 resources

Results 1391 - 1400 of 1806

Order by    Date Title

Social work and the future in a post-Covid 19 world: a foresight lens and a call to action for the profession

Journal of Technology in Human Services

What is the future of the social work profession? This paper explores what being more future facing might look like for social workers/educators and introduces foresight as a useful and urgently needed framework for the profession. Contemporary realities like Covid-19 and uprisings associated with long-standing racial violence bring added relevance to the need to apply new ways of thinking, use new practical techniques, and strengthen a collective ability to see beyond the current cannon of ideas and approaches. These additions to the social work toolbox are much needed in a world full of inequity, change and turbulence. Utilization of a foresight lens has the opportunity to amplify and deepen the sociological and moral imagination, as well as the strategic effectiveness of the profession of social work now and in the years ahead. The paper ends with a call to action to amplify and evolve social work strengths to join the interdisciplinary community of those using forecasting methods to build a better future.

Last updated on hub: 29 October 2020

Social work and the future in a post-Covid 19 world: a foresight lens and a call to action for the profession

Journal of Technology in Human Services

What is the future of the social work profession? This paper explores what being more future facing might look like for social workers/educators and introduces foresight as a useful and urgently needed framework for the profession. Contemporary realities like Covid-19 and uprisings associated with long-standing racial violence bring addedrelevance to the need to apply new ways of thinking, use new practical techniques, and strengthen a collective ability to see beyond the current cannon of ideas and approaches. These additions to the social work toolbox are much neededin a world full of inequity, change and turbulence. Utilization of a foresight lens has the opportunity to amplify and deepen the sociological and moral imagination, as well as the strategic effectiveness of the profession of social work now and in the years ahead. The paper ends with a call to action to amplify and evolve social work strengths to join the interdisciplinary community of those using forecasting methods to build a better future.

Last updated on hub: 31 August 2020

Social work assessments for people with advanced dementia in “the new normal”

Working with Older People

Purpose: Social work involves working directly with people who are experiencing a crisis. An assessment is carried out to establish the best way forward and then reviewed after a period of time to measure success or recalibrate the service. The current pandemic restrictions have all but ruled out meeting with people face-to-face. Now, professionals are usually required to don some form of personal protective equipment (PPE) when meeting with people and their families. Talking to an unknown professional who is behind a mask or on the telephone, about a personal issue is hard for everyone, but it is particularly difficult for people who may be further on in their dementia journey. Design/methodology/approach: Critique. Findings: These impediments impact the social work assessment and review, meaning people may not have the quality of service they need and may end up paying for unnecessary provision. If admission to a care home is deemed necessary, the stakes rise considerably. A care home admission means contributing towards fees with pensions, savings and assets, including housing. Now, it comes with an additional health risk. Originality/value: COVID-19 infection has impacted on the older population but residents in care homes with frailer physical health, cognitive impairment and delirium are at particularly high risk of dying.

Last updated on hub: 29 December 2020

Social work during a health pandemic

British Association of Social Workers England

This briefing considers some of the issues for social workers involved in transdisciplinary, multiagency working in a COVID-19 team. The briefing covers: what is COVID-19 and its symptoms; what advice can social workers give to help people keep themselves, their families and communities safe; and what can social workers do to support health professionals and those affected by COVID-19. The Appendix to the briefing covers some pointers about helping people to develop self-help, self-care and resilience, especially in relation to helping people identify their strengths that they can use to reassure themselves and lessen their anxieties. This briefing complements BASW professional practice guidance: The role of social workers in a pandemic and its aftermath: learning from Covid-19.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Social work during the Covid-19 pandemic: initial findings

British Association of Social Workers

Reports the results of a survey of social workers conducted between 30 November and 31 December 2020 across the four nations of the UK. More than eleven hundred social workers, in a range of roles, took part. This report sets out the key messages, background and objectives, the methodology and the results of the survey. The findings show that intervention and early help for vulnerable adults, children and families is still not readily accessible, as 79% agreed or strongly agreed that they had encountered more difficulties in accessing essential support services for the people with whom they worked. This situation is compounded by the finding that more people are requiring social services, with 67.6% of respondents who worked in children’s services agreed or strongly agreed that they had seen an increase in the number of referrals and/or their caseload since the return to schools and colleges for autumn 2020. Against this backdrop of rising caseloads and depletion of support services, 77.7% agreed or strongly agreed that their experience of working under lockdown restrictions had increased their concerns about the capacity to safeguard/protect adults and children.

Last updated on hub: 01 February 2021

Social Work England and PCFSW best practice guide for assessing online risks, harm and resilience and safeguarding of children and young people online

Principal Children and Families Social Worker Network

A practice guide to help support social workers to think about and assess online risks, harm and resilience and safeguarding children and young people online. The guide is aimed at social work and social care practitioners and managers, as well as qualifying social work students. It includes a framework for assessing online risks, harm and resilience; a framework for the holistic assessment of children and families; and a practice tool that can be used with young people and their families for assessing online risks and resilience. The guide has been developed by Social Work England and the Principal Children and Families Social Worker (PCFSW) network in consultation with practitioners, managers and the PCFSW reference group. Version last updated: 26 May 2020.

Last updated on hub: 09 June 2020

Social work in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic: all in this together?

British Journal of Social Work

This is the editorial for this issue that introduces the articles in the issue and comments on social work in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. It states that across the globe, nations find themselves in lockdown in order to fight the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), with social work and social care being no exception. The editorial also outlines some of the key problems and challenges for social work, which include: isolation in residential care for older people; the exacerbation of anxiety and paranoia for those with long-term mental health problems; families prohibited from embracing their loved ones at the end of life; the operation of social distancing in prisons; how to survive, never mind self-isolate, at home for people who have no home; the risks posed to social care staff who all too often do not have adequate personal protection equipment nor are they able to use touch as they communicate with vulnerable people in these very particular circumstances. The editorial also states that social work must look out for and speak for, the most marginalised and vulnerable in our society. It suggests that the profession must take the lead in building coalitions that will share and adapt existing expertise to address issues of well-being and survival for those who do not have the resources to do this for themselves. It also suggests that it is easy to overlook the other reality that people continue to experience breakdown and crisis and need routine support services.

Last updated on hub: 14 May 2020

Social work in times of disasters: a green social work perspective webinar

British Association of Social Workers England

In this webinar, Professor Lena Dominelli (University of Stirling) discusses current research into social workers in disasters and what this means for frontline practitioners. This webinar is based on research Lena has been doing since 2009 in relation to disasters. On the webpage you can access accompanying resources and documents relevant to the webinar, including PowerPoint presentation [Webinar recording made 2 March 2020].

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Social work involvement in the COVID-19 response in China: interdisciplinary remote networking

Journal of Social Work

Summary: Social workers in China have been involved significantly in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This article introduces the innovative interdisciplinary remote networking framework which both provides a guide for medical and community social workers’ involvement during the COVID-19 outbreaks, and also to support interdisciplinary collaboration with the aim of helping individuals and families in need during the pandemic. Findings: The implementation of interdisciplinary remote networking, developed by Chinese social workers, has effectively addressed the different domains of need experienced by the affected population and has established a new approach for social work in the field of health. The framework also provides an effective model for setting up a targeted and sustained service system that links social workers with psychological and medical resources, which capitalize on social resources to buffer the negative impacts of the disease. Social workers play an essential role during such a public health emergency, providing critical services for patients and families, medical workers, self-quarantined residents, and the general population. Applications: The service mode of interdisciplinary remote networking, based on the frontline experiences of social work interventions in China, may serve as a framework for combating COVID-19 in other countries. The framework is among the initiatives that provide transferrable skills to social work practitioners working in network-based social work services during public health emergencies. Thus, the framework presents implications for future practice development in both disaster social work and also public health social work.

Last updated on hub: 18 February 2021

Social work leadership in a medical school: a coordinated, compassionate COVID-19 response

Social Work in Health Care

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the systemic inequities in our health care system and society has called for actions to meet the clinical, psychosocial and educational needs in health care settings and communities. In this paper we describe how an organized Department of Health Social Work in a medical school played a unique role in responding to the challenges of a pandemic with community, clinical, and educational initiatives that were integral to our community’s health.

Last updated on hub: 18 March 2021

Order by    Date Title