COVID-19 resources

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A structured tool for communication and care planning in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic

Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Residents in long-term care settings are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 infections and, compared to younger adults, are at higher risk of poor outcomes and death. Given the poor prognosis of resuscitation outcomes for COVID-19 in general, the specter of COVID-19 in long-term care residents should prompt revisiting goals of care. Visitor restriction policies enacted to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 to long-term care residents requires advance care planning discussions to be conducted remotely. A structured approach can help guide discussions regarding the diagnosis, expected course, and care of individuals with COVID-19 in long-term care settings. Information should be shared in a transparent and comprehensive manner to allay the increased anxiety that families may feel during this time. To achieve this, this paper proposes an evidence-based COVID-19 Communication and Care Planning Tool that allows for an informed consent process and shared decision making between the clinician, resident, and their family.

Last updated on hub: 24 August 2020

Editorial: unprecedented times? Social work and society post-COVID-19

British Journal of Social Work

Sets out the key messages from the latest issue of the British Journal of Social Work and emphasises how, in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, social work, along with allied professions, must adapt and change without losing sight of its core ethos and skills and drawing on the lessons from both research and practice.

Last updated on hub: 24 August 2020

COVID-19 and English council funding: how are budgets being hit in 2020-21?

Institute for Fiscal Studies

This report examines the scale and nature of forecast impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic on local authorities spending and income. It explores how impacts may vary across council types, regions and council characteristics; compares the impacts with the financial resources provided to councils by central government and with the resources available to them in the form of reserves; and considers the implications for future funding policy. Councils forecast spending pressures of £4.4 billion and non-tax income pressures of £2.8 billion in 2020–21. Taken together, this equates to a financial hit equal to 13.0% of pre-crisis expenditure. Adult social care accounts for £1.8 billion of the spending pressures, with unspecified unachieved efficiency savings accounting for the next-biggest chunk, at £0.6 billion. Taken together, councils’ forecasts for spending and non-tax income and the baseline scenario for funding imply a funding shortfall of approximately £2 billion this year, although uncertainty about pressures and funding availability means there is scope for the gap to be much bigger or smaller. The report argues that several options are available to the Government. The simplest approach would be to increase the general grant funding it gives councils but targeted support to those councils facing the greatest problems would be more affordable. One option would be to follow the example of Wales, where councils submit claims based on the additional costs they have incurred, subject to some vetting. Temporary powers to borrow to cover day-to-day spending could also be considered, and have been identified by the OECD as a sensible way to give local areas more flexibility and autonomy to respond to the crisis as they see fit.

Last updated on hub: 24 August 2020

Experiences of child and adolescent to parent violence in the Covid-19 pandemic

University of Oxford

This report draws upon the findings of online surveys of 104 parents who have experiences C/APV from their child aged 10-19 years and 47 practitioners who work with families experiencing C/APV. It also draws data provided by all 43 police forces across England and Wales on total numbers of reported C/APV incidents over the one-year period from 1st April 2019 to 31st May 2020. The analysis reveals that 70% of parents reported an increase in violent episodes during lockdown; 69% of practitioners said they had seen an increase in referrals for families experiencing C/APV; 64% of practitioners identified that the severity or incidence of violence had increased; 29% of parents identified a decline in C/APV during the lockdown period which was explained by a reduction in the stresses and triggers for violence in this period. Respondents identified some lockdown-specific reasons for the increase in C/APV, which include spatial confinement and coerced proximity, changes in structure and routine, fear and anxiety and lack of access to formal and informal support. The report makes ten recommendations to services, local authorities, and government in planning a response to C/APV, including ensuring robust safeguarding measures for young people and families experiencing C/APV; planning for a rise in demand for support as lockdown lifts and schools and workplaces reopen; avoiding over-criminalisation of young people using violence; and providing safe spaces for families at crisis point and respite care for young people.

Last updated on hub: 24 August 2020

Homelessness monitor England 2020: COVID-19 crisis response briefing

Crisis

This briefing reflects on the early lessons from the Covid-19 crisis response to some of the most extreme forms of homelessness and looks ahead to the exit strategy. With government financial support and guidance, local authorities have sought to get ‘Everyone In’ as rough sleeping in England has been reframed as an urgent public health issue, and emergency measures have sought to prevent other forms of homelessness as well. Key findings include: levels of infection seem very low amongst homeless people accommodated under the Everyone In initiative, indicating a relatively successful public health strategy with regards to this vulnerable population; the speed and clarity of the early central Government response was widely welcomed, with local authorities and homelessness charities also praised for rapidly rising to an unprecedented challenge; however, subsequent ‘mixed messages’ from central Government on the medium to longer-term response became a matter of acute concern amongst local authorities and their third sector partners. The report argues that a decisive shift away from communal forms of sleeping provision would be a positive outcome, as well as more broadly a direction of travel that encompassed less emphasis on hostels with shared facilities. It notes that the (understandable) emphasis given to immediate crisis response during the pandemic has squeezed out prevention activity at many levels, and that a ‘spike’ in family homelessness in particular is expected as the evictions ban and furlough schemes come to an end.

Last updated on hub: 24 August 2020

Coronavirus and depression in adults, Great Britain: June 2020

The Office for National Statistics

This article looks at depressive symptoms in adults in Great Britain before the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic (July 2019 to March 2020) and during the pandemic (June 2020). It looks at the same group of adults over a 12-month period, providing a unique perspective of how depression has changed over time. The analysis shows that almost one in five adults were likely to be experiencing some form of depression during the pandemic in June 2020; this had almost doubled from around 1 in 10 before the pandemic. Adults who were aged 16 to 39 years old, female, unable to afford an unexpected expense, or disabled were the most likely to experience some form of depression during the pandemic. Feeling stressed or anxious was the most common way adults experiencing some form of depression felt their wellbeing was being affected, with 84.9% stating this. Over two in five adults experiencing some form of depression during the pandemic said their relationships were being affected, compared with one in five adults with no or mild depressive symptoms.

Last updated on hub: 24 August 2020

The witness to witness program: helping the helpers in the context of the Covid‐19 pandemic

Family Process

The Witness to Witness Program (W2W), based on Weingarten’s witnessing model (2000, 2003, 2004), began in July 2018 and originally was established to support health care workers and attorneys (our partners) who were experiencing empathic distress working with people involved in various stages of the detention process. The W2W program evolved to offer four primary components: clinician listening sessions geared to deep understanding of the person’s story of their work and its challenges; an inventory of the person’s current internal and external resources both in the present and the past; help with removal of barriers to those resources; and development of a personal toolkit to handle stress. Additional services available to partners and their organizations included psycho‐educational webinars, facilitated peer support groups and organizational consultations to foster trauma‐ sensitive and resilience‐hardy work environments. In March, after lockdowns due to the coronavirus pandemic, W2W pivoted to focus on handouts and webinars addressing how to cope with distress and moral injury, maintaining resilience, coping with grief and dealing with multiple losses caused by the pandemic. Disaster sparked collaboration and innovation. A train the trainers model was developed to reach more community health workers providing services to the Latinx community dealing with losses similar to those experienced by the clients they serve. W2W continues to create virtual communities of support. In doing so we practice doing reasonable hope together (Weingarten, 2010b).

Last updated on hub: 21 August 2020

The “flip”- sustaining complexity and multiplicity post‐quarantine

Family Process

This article describes poststructural ways of responding to the pandemic by looking for openings or gaps within more traditional ways of interacting with dilemmas. The author situates herself within a “positive deviance “ epistemology, which looks for what already works rather than getting captured by the current problem. We “flip” what are the usual ways of responding and explore three different programs that illustrate inventive and assets‐based approaches. Linking‐Lives Storython, created specifically to utilize our Covid shelter‐in‐place experience; Re‐Authoring Teaching: Creating a Collaboratory , begun 12 years ago to meet the needs of a wide‐spread community; and Witness‐to‐Witness , a current response to contemporary disastrous situations—all have utilized technology to open possibilities for those who are helped as well as those who are helpers. The article shows how each program has specifically flipped more traditional ways of responding, but also how this “flip” employs a practice of “disciplined improvisation.” Each program has a built‐in structure that depends on technology to make it work; each has a disciplined approach that allows the helpers to improvise to meet the needs of the receivers. It is this “flip,” this way of thinking, that can sustain us and our work in times of great complexity and multiplicity.

Last updated on hub: 21 August 2020

Family science in the context of the COVID‐19 pandemic: solutions and new directions

Family Process

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic has precipitated substantial global disruption and will continue to pose major challenges. In recognition of the challenges currently faced by family scientists, the authors share their perspectives about conducting family research in the context of the COVID‐19 pandemic. There are two primary issues addressed in this article. First, a range of potential solutions to challenges in research are presented, resulting from the pandemic, and strategies for preserving ongoing research efforts are discussed. This paper discusses approaches to scaling back existing protocols, share ideas for adapting lab‐based measures for online administration (e.g., using video chat platforms), and suggest strategies for addressing missing data and reduced sample size due to lower participation rates and funding restrictions. This paper also discusses the importance of measuring COVID‐19 relevant factors to use as controls or explore as moderators of primary hypotheses. Second, this paper discusses how the COVID‐19 pandemic represents a scientifically important context for understanding how families adjust and adapt to change and adversity. Increased stress precipitated by the pandemic, varying from acute stress associated with job loss to more chronic and enduring stress, will undoubtedly take a toll. This paper discusses ways that family scientists can contribute to pandemic‐related research to promote optimal family functioning and protect the health of family members.

Last updated on hub: 21 August 2020

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, meaningful communication between family caregivers and residents of long-term care facilities is imperative

Journal of Aging and Social Policy

Older adults residing in long-term care facilities are especially vulnerable for severe illness or death from COVID-19. To contain the transmission of the virus in long-term care facilities, federal health officials have issued strict visitation guidelines, restricting most visits between residents and all visitors, including family members. Yet, many older adults rely on family care for social support and to maintain their health, well-being, and safety in long-term care facilities, and therefore need to stay connected to their families. The federal government, state and local leaders, and long-term care facilities should take further actions to enable the relationship between residents of long-term care facilities and families during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 21 August 2020

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