COVID-19 resources

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Supporting mental health during Covid-19: a brief guide

Centre for Mental Health

This guide provides practical tips about mental health during the lockdown and in the months to come. The resource is intended to be used in workplaces, communities, organisations and charities as a very brief guide to having a conversation about mental health. It provides links to sources of help and support as well as practical ideas and information for people who may need some support to maintain their wellbeing during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Last updated on hub: 02 July 2020

Supporting mental health in communities during the coronavirus crisis: bringing together voluntary, community and statutory services

Centre for Mental Health

This briefing looks at how statutory service commissioners and providers are working with the voluntary and community sector to respond to the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis. It also provides practical advice on how to build effective partnerships locally. This includes recognising the value of different contributions and their role in preventing later crises; supporting smaller organisations that work with high risk groups or those who find mainstream services less helpful; maintaining safeguarding to protect people at risk of abuse; and valuing organisations that provide key functions such as supported housing, advocacy and support. It concludes with recommendations for NHS and local authority commissioners when working with the voluntary and community sector to help them to maximise their contribution without jeopardising their longer-term sustainability.

Last updated on hub: 22 April 2020

Supporting older people and people living with dementia during self-isolation

British Geriatrics Society

Guidance on meeting the needs of older people who are self-isolating during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. It includes information on meeting older people's psychological needs and promoting wellbeing, and advice for older people on remaining connected and staying active as much as possible during the pandemic. It also includes a specific section on the needs of people living with dementia and memory problems, particularly on how to help them to understand and follow Covid-19 advice.

Last updated on hub: 20 April 2020

Supporting relatives to connect to residents during COVID-19: episode 5

My Home Life England

'Conversations with Care Homes' is a series by My Home Life England (MHLE). This episode focuses on innovative tips and techniques that care homes across the country are using to keep relatives connected to residents, as well as informed and reassured at this understandably anxious time. And to end, one care home gets a visit from a rainbow pony! Video posted 7 May, 2020.

Last updated on hub: 09 June 2020

Supporting special guardians during the pandemic: Kinship Response delivery and impact during May – October 2020

Grandparents Plus

An assessment of the impact of Kinship Response during the pandemic. Kinship Response is an adaptation of the Kinship Connected support programme to support special guardians (kinship carers who have parental responsibility until the age of 18), developed and delivered by Grandparents Plus since 2018. Kinship Response was adapted, in consultation with local authorities and with feedback from special guardians, to provide targeted and time limited telephone and virtual support during the pandemic. It offers a comprehensive package of support beyond the specialist therapeutic support normally funded by the Adoption Support Fund. This includes tailored advice and one-to-one and peer support which is what kinship carers have told us they need and for which there is strong evidence of impact. The report reveals that 378 kinship carers, between them raising 527 kinship children, have received one-to-one support from project workers; and over 200 kinship carers have been matched with a Someone Like Me volunteer working on our peer-to-peer telephone support service. In terms of impact, of the kinship carers who have been referred to Kinship Response: 93% say they feel more confident in their caring role; 68% say they are more able to manage family relationships; 92% report having reduced concerns about their child’s wellbeing; and 78% feel less lonely and 79% feel less isolated.

Last updated on hub: 24 November 2020

Supporting survivors of campus dating and sexual violence during COVID-19: a social work perspective

Social Work in Health Care

The issue of dating and sexual violence (DSV) on college campuses has received increased attention nationwide as a criminal justice and public health issue. College and university employed social workers play a critical role in preventing and responding to campus DSV through direct clinical services to students as well as prevention through educational programming and training. COVID-19 has negative implications for DSV student victims, as well as service delivery and accessibility. This paper examines the innovative methods used by university employed social work clinicians and educators to meet evolving mental health care needs and continue violence prevention services during COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 18 March 2021

Supporting the emotional wellbeing of adults in child care settings during the COVID-19

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

In order to provide an emotionally responsive environment for young people in care, we must turn our attention to the emotional wellbeing of the adults who look after them. The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity to highlight the importance of the emotional wellbeing of caring adults. This includes introducing processes within the workplace that can be adopted to support the development of self-care, such as developing skills in self-awareness, emotional literacy and regulation, enabling adults to be emotionally present and responsive to the needs of young people. This article reflects on the introduction of supervision, reflective practice and consultation within Aberlour Sycamore Services in Scotland, summarising a recent evaluation of these structures.

Last updated on hub: 27 November 2020

Supporting the emotional wellbeing of adults in child care settings during the COVID-19 pandemic

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

In order to provide an emotionally responsive environment for young people in care, we must turn our attention to the emotional wellbeing of the adults who look after them. The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity to highlight the importance of the emotional wellbeing of caring adults. This includes introducing processes within the workplace that can be adopted to support the development of self-care, such as developing skills in self-awareness, emotional literacy and regulation, enabling adults to be emotionally present and responsive to the needs of young people. This article reflects on the introduction of supervision, reflective practice and consultation within Aberlour Sycamore Services in Scotland, summarising a recent evaluation of these structures.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Supporting the LGBTQ+ population through COVID-19 and beyond

NHS Confederation

Following a scoping roundtable and consultation with the Health and Care LGBTQ+ Leaders Network members, this briefing sets out a series of recommendations to help healthcare leaders, service designers and commissioners ensure their services and workplaces meet the needs of the LGBTQ+ population. These are: create visible leadership and confident staff; create a strong knowledge base; be non-heteronormative and non-cisnormative in everything you do; take responsibility for collecting and reporting data; listen to your service users; proactively seek out partners to co-deliver services.

Last updated on hub: 22 February 2021

Supporting vulnerable children and young people during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak: actions for educational providers and other partners

Department for Education

Guidance for schools and local authorities about children supported through social care, with Education Health and Care (EHC) plans or identified as vulnerable by their school, college, early years provider or local authority. The guidance covers the identification of vulnerable children and young people; determining whether attendance at school or college is appropriate; supporting vulnerable children and young people's wellbeing; and responding to increased safeguarding concerns as more children return to on-site education provision. The guidance is for service providers, including: local-authority-maintained schools and academies, all alternative provision including pupil referral units local authorities and providers of children’s social care. [Published 22 March 2020. Updated 15 May 2020].

Last updated on hub: 02 June 2020

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