COVID-19 resources

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Using direct payments during the coronavirus outbreak: full guidance for people receiving direct payments and personal assistants

Department of Health and Social Care

This document sets out key messages to support people in planning and receiving their care safely during the pandemic, including slowing the transmission of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and reducing the possibility of hospital admission or care breaking down. It is aimed at people of all ages ‒ children, young people and adults ‒ who receive support through their personal budgets or personal health budgets and take this as a direct payment. It is also relevant to family members, local authorities (LAs), clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), providers and people who are employed through a direct payment, including PAs (including those who are self-employed). Topics covered include: flexible use of direct payments during the pandemic; continuation of direct payments; personal protective equipment (PPE); employment of individuals; the coronavirus job retention scheme; statutory sick pay (SSP) for PAs with COVID-19 like symptoms; testing; monitoring requirements; self-funders; and keeping safe. [Last updated 27 April 2021]

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Protecting and safeguarding older people: Covid-19 information pack

Older People's Commissioner for Wales

This pack provides a range of useful information and resources about keeping older people safe in Wales – including how to identify older people who may be at risk, and contact details for key organisations that can provide crucial help and support.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

The mental health effects of the first two months of lockdown and social distancing during the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK

Institute of Fiscal Studies

Mental health in the UK worsened substantially as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic – by 8.1% on average and by much more for young adults and for women which are groups that already had lower levels of mental health before Covid-19. Hence inequalities in mental health have been increased by the pandemic. Even larger average effects are observed for measures of mental health that capture the number problems reported or the fraction of the population reporting any frequent or severe problems, which more than doubled for some groups such as young women. It is important to control for pre-existing recent trends in mental health when attempting to understand and isolate the effects of Covid-19.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Supporting ‘off-radar’ children and young people who are at risk of violence/abuse in their household: Part 1 (interim report)

Survivors’ Voices

This survivor-led report contains relevant possible actions to support children who are 'off-radar' (unknown to any statutory services) during and post pandemic 'lockdown' periods. It provides an initial collation and thematic analysis of the results of a survivor-led and rapid-response survey. This was targeted at people who had experience of being abused as children whilst unknown to safeguarding or support services, in order to capture the wisdom of lived experience regarding what practical actions may help reach this population. Actions and recommendations cover a range of topics and thematic areas, which are grouped into the settings to which they apply. These include: schools, nurseries, and childcare; other statutory services; youth organisations and other voluntary agencies and services that work with young people; government and national and international agencies; communities and families. The report suggests that the overwhelming consensus is that there is a need for a major awareness-raising and information campaign using TV/media and a variety of social and other media; and to develop ways to ensure children and young people can communicate with those who can help, including apps, a free phone helpline and web-based links.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Time for a clean slate: children’s mental health at the heart of education

Barnardo's UK

This briefing we highlight lessons from practitioners in school settings about the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people. It also examines how schools seek to strengthen their support for their pupils’ mental health and wellbeing; and the opportunities to make changes to the wider education system so it prioritises wellbeing as well as academic progress. The report finds that nearly half of practitioners are supporting a child or young person with increasing mental health needs. This includes symptoms of anxiety, stress, sleep disregulation, depression, reduced self-esteem, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) behaviours, paranoia and self-harm. The report makes specific recommendations to the government, schools and teachers, calling for a trauma-informed approach to policy making and prioritising child welfare and wellbeing, so that it is on a par with academic achievement.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Learning from staff experiences of Covid-19: let the light come streaming in

King's Fund

Draws the lessons from health and social care staff experiences of Covid-19. It argues that the past few months have taught us that staff must have autonomy and control, feel a greater sense of belonging and be supported in order to have a sense of competence, rather than simply being overwhelmed by excessive workload.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Rapid review: supervision

What Works for Children's Social Care

A review of the literature on how supervision in child and family social work can be managed virtually and on the resulting implications for social workers, managers, children and families. Virtual supervision in social work is a relatively new and unfamiliar concept but the current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that it is now increasingly used as social work teams adapt. Behavioural science literature on virtual communications offers key insights, some of which are applicable to the context of virtual supervision, which include: management style matters (transformational leadership that motivates the workforce and generate new ideas); paying attention to building trust in a virtual setting; there may be gains to creative brainstorming – ideas and creative responses are generated more frequently in a virtual team setting, perhaps due to the less personal context; confirmation bias – the tendency to favour information that confirms one’s own values and beliefs – can be greater in virtual settings. The evidence appears to identify a number of approaches, actions and leadership styles that can promote effectiveness in virtual supervision. These include: encouraging the inclusion of preference-challenging information and structured conflict in decision-making; holding case discussions separate from the action-orientated, decision-making part of supervision to help find consensus on solutions; promoting employees’ competence, autonomy and relatedness; exploring opportunities for maintaining informal forms of supervision and ‘weak ties’ that could be lost in a virtual setting; and promoting trust.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

COVID-19 resources

What Works for Children's Social Care

The resources on this page have been created by What Works for Children’s Social Care and other organisations to provide guidance, support and inspiration for those working in children’s social care. Includes links to rapid evidence reviews, practice guides, podcasts and webinars.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

COVID-19 and inequalities

Institute of Fiscal Studies

This report brings together what has emerged so far about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on inequalities across several key domains of life. It provides an overview of the state of inequalities before the pandemic; examines how the pandemic interacts with existing inequalities, particularly in relation to sector shutdowns, working from home and key workers, families with children, school closures, health risks and vulnerable people; and considers the implications for future inequalities. The study finds that the nature of the economic shock associated with the pandemic has interacted with many old inequalities, with young people and BAME groups being particularly affected. In addition, some ethnic minority groups have had higher death rates than the rest of the population. The report also highlights some opportunities resulting for examples from an expansion of remote working and changes in attitudes toward the welfare system, which may contribute to address and reduce some of the current inequalities.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Realising the true value of integrated care: beyond COVID-19

International Foundation for Integrated Care

Drawing on the learning from the COVID-19 pandemic, this think piece makes the case for accelerating health and care integration to realise its true value and full potential. It argues that the speed and scale of the response required by the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted how the fragmentation in current health and care systems significantly impairs the services' ability to respond effectively. Redesigning the system around integration requires collective action in a number of areas, which need to be strengthened and consolidated. These include: developing shared values and vision; focusing on population health and local context; working with people as partners in care; developing resilient communities and new alliances; increasing workforce capacity and capability; supporting system wide governance and leadership; investing on digital solutions; aligning payment systems; and pursuing transparency of progress, results and impact.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

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