COVID-19 resources

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10 leaps forward: innovation in the pandemic. What we want to keep from this experience: going ‘back to better’

London South Bank University

An analysis of the findings of an online survey asking leaders and clinicians to reflect and play back in their own words the most important transformations that have happened due to COVID-19. The findings show that in a very short time healthcare services have learned to operate as a highly performing system and made significant advances. These include: staff being properly valued and supported; using 21st century tools; working with connected, visible, engaged leaders; care basics and inefficiencies have been fixed and sorted; local health systems have joined up together to get things done; staff working together as real teams; staff have stepped up and acted with professionalism and autonomy. As a result, the healthcare system is now better placed to make decisions based on needs and think pro-actively; to make mutual decisions with patients as partners; and to work in close collaboration with its community.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

The impact of the coronavirus pandemic on child welfare: domestic abuse

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

This briefing uses insight from NSPCC helpline contacts and Childline counselling sessions to highlight the impact of domestic abuse on children and young people during the coronavirus pandemic. Domestic abuse is any type of controlling, bullying, threatening or violent behaviour between people who are, or have been, in a relationship. Between 23 March and 17 May 2020 the NSPCC helpline received 1,500 contacts from adults worried about the impact of domestic abuse on children, and Childline delivered over 500 counselling sessions to children and young people who were worried about domestic abuse. The key themes of these contacts include: reduced access to support networks; and lockdown bringing domestic abuse into sharp focus – making it harder to speak out, making it more difficult to leave, drinking during lockdown, exploiting fears about the coronavirus, young people worried about other family members.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Coronavirus briefing: safeguarding guidance and information for schools

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

This briefing summarises the latest guidance for UK schools on safeguarding during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It pulls together key safeguarding guidance from all four UK nations on how to keep children safe during the pandemic. It answers frequently asked questions including: who has to go to school; how to monitor attendance; what happens if nominated child protection leads need to self-isolate or become ill; what schools should do about free school meals; and what happens with families who have contract arrangements or where parents are separated. [Updated 8 January 2021]

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Coronavirus and loneliness, Great Britain: 3 April to 3 May 2020

The Office for National Statistics

Analysis of loneliness in Great Britain during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey. Data shows that 5% of people in Great Britain (2.6 million adults) reported that they felt lonely "often" or "always" between 3 April and 3 May 2020, about the same proportion as pre-lockdown. Of those asked, 30.9% (7.4 million adults) reported their well-being had been affected through their feeling lonely in the past seven days. Working-age adults living alone were more likely to report loneliness both “often or always” and over the past seven days than the average adult; this was also the case for those in "bad" or "very bad" health, in rented accommodation, or who were either single, or divorced, separated or a former or separated civil partner. Both those feeling lonely “often or always” and in the past seven days had lower personal well-being scores including higher anxiety scores than the Great Britain average and were more likely than the average to say they were struggling to find things that help them cope during lockdown. Around 7 in 10 of those feeling lonely “often or always” “agreed” or “strongly agreed” that they had people who would be there for them, compared with 9 in 10 of the Great Britain average.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Guide to remote court hearings

Transparency Project

This short guide explains what remote court hearings are and how they will work. It answers some common queries that users may have. It is aimed at parents involved in family court cases about their children – and anyone else involved in family court cases, regardless of whether or not they have a lawyer. The document address the following questions and concerns: what is a remote hearing; what is a hybrid hearing; what will happen at the remote hearing; how to join a remote hearing; whether there are costs to join; what devices, apps or software are needed; concerns about being able to work the technology; can I have someone with me during the remote hearing; needing to speak privately with the lawyer or supporter during the hearing; what if I want a face to face hearing; what if something goes wrong; what happens after the hearing; where can I find out more.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme: people receiving direct payments

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance helps people who buy care and support through a direct payment to know how and when they can use the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) to furlough employees during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. It covers a whole range of practical situations, including: when a PA or carer needs to shield; when a PA lives with somebody who needs to shield; when a PA or carer has caring responsibilities; and using the CJRS if the direct payment holder does not want their PA entering their home at this time. The guidance includes examples of when direct payment holders may or may not choose to use the CJRS. [Published 8 June 2020. Last updated 10 June 2020]

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): looking after people who lack mental capacity

Department of Health and Social Care

Brings together emergency guidance for health and social care staff in England and Wales who are caring for, or treating, a person who lacks the relevant mental capacity during the coronavirus outbreak. The guidance ensures that decision makers are clear about the steps they need to take during this period. It focuses on new scenarios and potential ‘deprivations of liberty’ created by the outbreak. During the outbreak, the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and the safeguards provided by the deprivation of liberty safeguards (DoLS) still apply. The MCA provides protection for people who lack or may lack the relevant mental capacity to make decisions about different aspects of their life. The DoLS are an important part of this act and provide further safeguards for those who need to be deprived of their liberty in order to receive care or treatment in a care home or hospital, but do not have the capacity to consent to those arrangements. [Published 9 April 2020. Last updated 27 April 2021]

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Supporting care-experienced children and young people during the Covid-19 crisis and its aftermath

British Psychological Society

This advice is intended for foster and kinship carers, adoptive parents, and professionals who work with care-experienced children in schools, residential care homes and other settings across the United Kingdom. The term ‘care-experienced’ is used with reference to all looked after and adopted children and those in kinship or residential care. The guidance has a focus on thinking about care-experienced children and young people particularly in relation to education during the Covid-19 pandemic. It covers self-care; support in feeling safe; stay connected; making the most of opportunities; and supporting transitions.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

“Coming second all the time”: life in lockdown for siblings of disabled children

Sibs

Findings of a survey of 876 parents, exploring the experience of siblings of disabled children during lockdown and the Covid-19 pandemic. The study examines the impact of the lockdown on the mental health and wellbeing of siblings; the challenges in supporting your sibling children; the difficulties faced by sibling children during lockdown; whether the lockdown meant that siblings had to provide more care to their brothers or sisters. The analysis shows that 75% of respondents felt that their sibling child’s mental health had worsened in lockdown; 50% of siblings were providing more care; and 1 in 3 siblings are feeling isolated and missing the support of family and friends. The survey also asked what would have helped parents and siblings during lockdown. The solutions put forward include: respite; financial support; space; exercise equipment; entertainment and toys; outdoor play equipment; having a safe and accessible garden; iPads, computers and electronic games; recognition and rewards.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Upholding ethical behaviour and human rights during COVID-19

The Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services

Lena Dominelli, Professor of Social Work at the University of Stirling, Chair of the IASSW Disaster Intervention, Climate Change and Sustainability Committee, and Chair of BASW’s special interest group on social work’s place in disasters (SPEDI), shares her reflections on upholding ethical behaviour, social justice and human rights during the COVID-19 pandemic [Published on 2 June 2020]

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

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