COVID-19 resources

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The 3 r’s of social care reform: how constructive risk taking, respectful relationships and a sense of reciprocity characterised a positive response to the Covid-19 pandemic

Think Local Act Personal

This paper draws on conversations with people across social care, and including those who draw on care and support, about their experiences during the pandemic. Whilst much has been challenging, many of these conversations also revealed positive responses to the pandemic, or examples where Covid-19 was an opportunity to innovate or accelerate towards a more personalised vision of social care. The paper reflects on these conversations and identifies drivers of the promising examples of practice, marked by changes in behaviour and increased levels of trust. It suggests that positive risk-taking, mutually respectful and two-way relationships and a sense of reciprocity are key ingredients in characterising a positive response to the pandemic. These behaviours and attitudes are brought to life in case studies that explore the impact of Covid-19 on self-directed support, commissioning, and the community response in different places in England. It highlights the value of co-production during the crisis, as a mechanism to quickly ascertain the challenges faced by people receiving care and support and in shaping a targeted response.

Last updated on hub: 07 June 2021

The Academy of Fabulous Stuff: COVID-19 resources and innovations

Academy of Fabulous Stuff

During the COVID-19 crisis the NHS and Social Care will be at its innovative best; finding new and better ways, developing resilience, being kind and improving the patient experience. Platform for sharing lots of innovative examples of practice.

Last updated on hub: 10 June 2020

The Adoption and Children (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020

House of Commons Library

This briefing describes the laying of the Adoption and Children (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020, which came into force on 24 April 2020, its content, and reaction from the sector. The regulations temporarily amend ten sets of regulations relating to children’s social care in England. The briefing includes commentary from the Association of Directors of Children’s Services, the Children’s Commissioner for England, and charity organisations. It also outlines the UK parliamentary proceedings in relation to the regulation and references relevant reports from the House of Lords Secondary Legislation Committee and the Joint Select Committee on Statutory Instruments. [Last updated 10 March 2021]

Last updated on hub: 20 August 2020

The Adoption and Children (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020

UK Parliament

This statutory instrument makes amendments to 10 sets of Regulations to assist the children’s social care sector during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It includes the relaxation of a range of duties relating to children in care, such as visits by social workers and independent reviews. The amended regulations come into force on 4th April 2020 and cease to have effect on the 25th September 2020.

Last updated on hub: 27 April 2020

The adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing home resident well-being

Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Objective: Quantify the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing home resident well-being. Design: Quantitative analysis of resident-level assessment data Setting and participants: Long-stay residents living in Connecticut nursing homes Methods: This study used Minimum Data Set assessments to measure nursing home resident outcomes observed in each week between March and July 2020 for long-stay residents (e.g., those in the nursing home for at least 100 days) who lived in a nursing home at the beginning of the pandemic. This study compared outcomes to those observed at the beginning of the pandemic, controlling for both resident characteristics and patterns for outcomes observed in 2017 to 2019. Results: this study found that nursing home resident outcomes worsened on a broad array of measures. The prevalence of depressive symptoms increased by 6 percentage points relative to before the pandemic in the beginning of March - representing a 15 percent increase. The share of residents with unplanned substantial weight loss also increased by 6 percentage points relative to the beginning of March - representing a 150 percent increase. This study also found significant increases in episodes of incontinence (4 percentage points) and significant reductions in cognitive functioning. Our findings suggest that loneliness and isolation play an important role. Though unplanned substantial weight loss was greatest for those who contracted COVID-19 (about 10 percent of residents observed in each week), residents who did not contract COVID-19 also physically deteriorated (about 7.5 percent of residents in each week). Conclusions and implications: These analyses show that the pandemic had substantial impacts on nursing home residents beyond what can be quantified by cases and deaths, adversely affecting the physical and emotional well-being of residents. Future policy changes to limit the spread of COVID-19 or other infectious disease outbreaks should consider any additional costs beyond the direct effects of morbidity and mortality due to COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 29 April 2021

The adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing home resident well-being

Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Objective: Quantify the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing home resident well-being. Design: Quantitative analysis of resident-level assessment data. Setting and participants: Long-stay residents living in Connecticut nursing homes. Methods: this study used Minimum Data Set assessments to measure nursing home resident outcomes observed in each week between March and July 2020 for long-stay residents (eg, those in the nursing home for at least 100 days) who lived in a nursing home at the beginning of the pandemic. This study compared outcomes to those observed at the beginning of the pandemic, controlling for both resident characteristics and patterns for outcomes observed in 2017-2019. Results: This study found that nursing home resident outcomes worsened on a broad array of measures. The prevalence of depressive symptoms increased by 6 percentage points relative to before the pandemic in the beginning of March - representing a 15% increase. The share of residents with unplanned substantial weight loss also increased by 6 percentage points relative to the beginning of March—representing a 150% increase. This study also found significant increases in episodes of incontinence (4 percentage points) and significant reductions in cognitive functioning. The findings suggest that loneliness and isolation play an important role. Though unplanned substantial weight loss was greatest for those who contracted COVID-19 (about 10% of residents observed in each week), residents who did not contract COVID-19 also physically deteriorated (about 7.5% of residents in each week). Conclusions and Implications: These analyses show that the pandemic had substantial impacts on nursing home residents beyond what can be quantified by cases and deaths, adversely affecting the physical and emotional well-being of residents. Future policy changes to limit the spread of COVID-19 or other infectious disease outbreaks should consider any additional costs beyond the direct effects of morbidity and mortality due to COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 06 May 2021

The After Party evaluation report on a socially distanced care home project: March – July 2020

Magic Me

This evaluation summarises outcomes for those involved in The After Party project, including care home residents and staff, volunteers, artists and staff from the care providers; and provides a short overview of Magic Me’s Cocktail in Care Homes (CICH) project, with a focus on the context of how The After Party began. The study also includes learning and suggestions for future work, in light of outcomes and learning from The After Party. For over 10 years Magic Me trained volunteers who were seeking connections with their local communities to come into their local care homes and have a party with residents. The After Party was developed as a way of keeping up the links with these key CICH sites during the pandemic, in place of the planned last few parties to mark the end of the CICH programme. Each month, After Party care partners received newsletters from Magic Me, which included artist actions and activities, alongside personalised messages from CICH Volunteers. After Party ‘care packages’ were sent via post by the artists, which included creative activities and resources, physical items, i.e. letters, artworks and/ or physical representations of artworks produced by volunteers and the wider public who have taken part in the creative activities throughout the month. They are physical mementos for residents, staff and the home/scheme. The evaluation found that Magic Me provided very easy to use care packages which met the needs of residents, were helpful to care staff, motivated volunteers and generated a great deal of happiness and interaction at a very difficult time. Benefits were felt by all involved. Although it was impossible to create the same sense of connection as when meeting face to face, it seems that The After Party managed to capture some of the energy and colour of the CICH parties and this was transferred into the online project.

Last updated on hub: 12 November 2020

The annual report of Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Education, Children's Services and Skills 2019/20

Ofsted

This Annual Report looks at schools, early years, further education and skills and children’s social care for the academic year 2019 to 2020. Ofsted’s findings are based on inspection evidence from inspections of, and visits to, schools, colleges and providers of social care, early years and further education and skills. The report also draws on findings from research and analysis this year. The report reflects an year of two halves (the ‘pre-COVID’ period from September 2019 to March 2020, and the ‘post-COVID’ period that followed) and insights from each period, but also highlights the commonalities across time and remits. Sections include a commentary of the findings; data on Ofsted’s activities; early years and childcare providers; schools; further education and skills; social care. Inspections under the education inspection framework (EIF) started in September 2019. Ofsted judgements of overall effectiveness remained high and largely unchanged. The concerns of some that the new framework would lead to turbulence in inspection grade profiles have not been borne out. Overall, half of the 151 local authority children’s services in England have now been judged to be good or outstanding. This is an increase from just over one third after each local authority’s first inspection under the single inspection framework (SIF). The percentage judged inadequate is also lower, at 14%. Inspections of children’s homes, under the social care common inspection framework (SCCIF), show that the vast majority of homes (80%) are currently good or outstanding. SEND inspections, on the other hand, point to a lack of a coordinated response from education and health services in many local areas.

Last updated on hub: 03 December 2020

The association of nursing home quality ratings and spread of COVID-19

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

Objectives: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has severely affected nursing home residents. Given the continued high incidence of COVID-19, and the likelihood that new variants and other infectious agents may cause future outbreaks, we sought to understand the relationship of nursing home quality ratings and measures of COVID-19 outbreak severity and persistence. Design: This study analyzed nursing home facility-level data on COVID-19 cases and deaths, county-level COVID-19 rates, and nursing home data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), including ratings from the CMS Nursing Home Five-Star Quality Rating System. We used regression analysis to examine the association between star ratings and cumulative COVID-19 incidence and mortality as well as persistent high resident incidence. Setting: All nursing homes in the CMS COVID-19 Nursing Home Dataset reporting data that passed quality assurance checks for at least 20 weeks and that were included in the January 2021 Nursing Home Care Compare update. Participants: Residents of the included nursing homes. Measurements: Cumulative resident COVID-19 incidence and mortality through January 10, 2021; number of weeks with weekly resident incidence of COVID-19 in the top decile nationally. Results: As of January 10, 2021, nearly all nursing homes (93.6%) had reported at least one case of COVID-19 among their residents, more than three-quarters (76.9%) had reported at least one resident death, and most (83.5%) had experienced at least 1 week in the top decile of weekly incidence. In analyses adjusted for facility and county-level characteristics, we found generally consistent relationships between higher nursing home quality ratings and lower COVID-19 incidence and mortality, as well as with fewer high-incidence weeks. Conclusion: Nursing home quality ratings are associated with COVID-19 incidence, mortality, and persistence. Nursing homes receiving five-star ratings, for overall quality as well as for each domain, had lower COVID-19 rates among their residents.

Last updated on hub: 26 July 2021

The big idea behind a new model of small nursing homes

Health Affairs

Long-term care facilities have been devastated by COVID-19, with one exception: a group of small facilities called Green Houses. This article describes how the the Green House nursing model works in Magnolia, Arkansas and how they had adapted care during the Coronavirus (COVID) pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2021

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