COVID-19 resources

Results 2211 - 2220 of 2820

Order by    Date Title

Stress-buffering role of social support during COVID-19

Family Process

In order to reduce the high infection rate of COVID-19, individuals began to engage in self-isolation amid a time of uncertainty and worry. Given that social support can be protective against the negative effects of distress on mental and physical health, the lack of support may negatively impact individuals during their self-isolation. Thus, the current study examined the role of self-isolation on feelings of stress, the perception and reception of social support, and mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. A sample of 405 college students were asked to report on the amount of self-isolation in which they were engaging, worry about COVID-19, psychological health, and received and perceived social support. Results indicated that when the length of time in self-isolation was taken into account, perceived social support buffered the connection between worry about COVID-19 and psychological health. These results indicate that social support, worry about COVID-19, and self-isolation may influence individuals’ psychological health during times of stress.

Last updated on hub: 23 November 2021

Stress‐buffering role of social support during COVID‐19

Family Process

In order to reduce the high infection rate of COVID‐19, individuals began to engage in self‐isolation amid a time of uncertainty and worry. Given that social support can be protective against the negative effects of distress on mental and physical health, the lack of support may negatively impact individuals during their self‐isolation. Thus, the current study examined the role of self‐isolation on feelings of stress, the perception and reception of social support, and mental health problems during the COVID‐19 pandemic. A sample of 405 college students were asked to report on the amount of self‐isolation in which they were engaging, worry about COVID‐19, psychological health, and received and perceived social support. Results indicated that when the length of time in self‐isolation was taken into account, perceived social support buffered the connection between worry about COVID‐19 and psychological health. These results indicate that social support, worry about COVID‐19, and self‐isolation may influence individuals’ psychological health during times of stress.

Last updated on hub: 21 December 2020

Stressors of COVID-19 and stress consequences: the mediating role of rumination and the moderating role of psychological support

Children and Youth Services Review

Backgrounds and aims: As COVID-19 spreads rapidly, this global pandemic has not only brought the risk of death but also spread unbearable psychological pressure to people around the world. The aim of this study was to explore (a) the mediating role of rumination in the association between stressors of COVID-19 and stress consequences of college students, and (b) the moderating role of psychological support in the indirect relationship between stressors of COVID-19 and stress consequences of college students. Methods: Eight hundred and forty-one Chinese college students (Mage = 19.50 years, SD = 1.580) completed the measures of stressors of COVID-19, stress consequences, rumination, and psychological support. Results: Stressors of COVID-19 were significantly positively associated with stress consequences, and mediation analyses indicated that rumination partially mediated this association. Moderated mediation analysis further revealed that psychological support buffered the relation between stressors of COVID-19 and rumination, as well as the relation between rumination and stress consequences. Discussion and conclusion: Findings of this study demonstrated that stressors associated with COVID-19 is positively related to rumination, which in turn, is related to stress consequences in college students. However, psychological support buffered this effect at both indirect mediation paths, suggesting that college students with greater psychological support may be better equipped to prevent negative stress consequences.

Last updated on hub: 17 November 2020

Stronger together? Intergenerational connection and Covid-19

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults

Purpose: This paper aims to review how intergenerational connections and relationships have been affected to date by COVID-19. It provides lessons for the future. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is a review of policy and practice. Findings: Although there are some excellent examples of creative approaches such as online strategies to bring generations together in the face of social distancing, there remain barriers to building stronger communities. Many people of all ages remain lonely and isolated. Community projects are under-funded and will struggle to maintain connections beyond the immediate crisis. Inequalities and the digital divide have been exacerbated by COVID-19. Intergenerational relations are likely to be further strained by the economic impact. Originality/value: None of us have known anything like COVID-19 and its impact on all aspects of our lives. It will continue to affect generations to come, and we need to learn the lessons as we move forward.

Last updated on hub: 29 December 2020

Structural discrimination and abuse: COVID-19 and people in care homes in England and Wales

Journal of Adult Protection

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the significant and high death toll of COVID-19 on care home residents and social care staff in England and Wales. These mortality figures, alongside differential treatment of residents and staff during the pandemic, are conceptualized as a form of structural abuse. Arguments are made for the inclusion of structural abuse as a separate category of elder abuse. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is predominantly conceptual but it also draws on available secondary data, such as mortality statistics, media reports and developing research. Findings: The lack of appropriate personal protective equipment, paucity of guidance and high mortality rate among care home staff and residents during the pandemic is indicative of social discourses that, when underpinned by ageism, reflect structural elder abuse. Research limitations/implications: The research is limited by its focus on a specific time period and its recency. It is also limited in not being based on primary empirical research but it remains exploratory and conceptual and provides a base for ongoing research in this area. Social implications: If structural elder abuse was to be included in classifications, it demands a rethink of social and health-care services and the policies and practices associated with them and reinforces the government message that safeguarding is everyone’s business. Originality/value: Research concerning the effects and impact of COVID-19 are still in their early stages. However, the central element of originality in the paper concerns the linking of practices, policies and underlying social assumptions and structural, or societally ingrained, elder abuse.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2021

Struggling to ‘do family’ during COVID-19: evidence from a German mixed-methods study

International Journal of Care and Caring

Applying the concept of doing family, which centres on the organisation of, and the practices in, families’ everyday lives, this research questions focus on the efforts mothers and fathers undertake to keep everyday life going during the pandemic. We analysed two-wave panel data of the project ‘Growing up in Germany’, and conducted 20 in-depth interviews with mothers and fathers in order to examine their strategies in detail. The findings confirm gender and other important differences, and reveal three major strategies to reconcile caring obligations with demands from paid work before and during the crisis.

Last updated on hub: 31 March 2022

Stuck at home in a cold home: the implications of Covid-19 for the fuel poor

People Place and Policy Online

Policies to address the impact of Covid-19 on low income energy consumers have rightly focussed on energy bills, particularly in the context of home confinement and increased energy consumption. In the longer term, however, we need policies to improve home energy standards. The evidence shows that higher standards reduce the risk of getting a respiratory illness, improve the health of those already with a respiratory illness, improve the ability of our immune systems to fight off illness and reduce the use of health services.

Last updated on hub: 06 August 2020

Student Space: an evaluation of a web-based intervention supporting student mental wellbeing over the pandemic

Centre for Mental Health

Findings of an independent evaluation of a web-based intervention to support student mental wellbeing in England and Wales during the pandemic. The intervention, Student Space, was developed by Student Minds and funded by the Office for Students and the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales. Student Space included four key elements: advice and information; student stories – five-minute video clips made by students giving practical advice; support services – from the outset, these included a phoneline, a text service, an email service and webchat; support at your university – this provides links to most higher education mental health and wellbeing services, via a search bar. All of the key stakeholders and students were impressed by the quality of Student Space and it was described as strongly evidence-based, relevant and very readable. Student Minds achieved this through ongoing insights research and robust processes to ensure the quality of material on the website. The four elements of Student Space have all been well received. However, not all elements of Student Space have as yet been fully tested and may be yet to reach their potential.

Last updated on hub: 15 February 2022

Studying social workers’ roles in natural disasters during a global pandemic: what can we learn?

Qualitative Social Work

The author reflects on the convergence of her roles as a qualitative researcher studying social workers’ roles during Hurricane Harvey, a student of public health, and a hospital social worker in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Similarities are drawn between the social work role following a natural disaster and a pandemic disaster along with observations regarding core differences. Practice and research recommendations are provided for social workers in the domains of therapeutic interactions, social justice, and public health. While therapeutic relationships have often been far more difficult to achieve during the pandemic than Hurricane Harvey, the assistance of technology and proper personal protective equipment has been helpful in filling communication gaps. Both types of disasters are universal in their reach, impacting people of all backgrounds; the social work role has been to address differences in access to resources, including health care and financial assistance. Finally, social workers play a significant role in public health during disasters through disseminating reliable information about safety, resources, and opportunities to assist others. The author recommends the expansion of social work in the public health space to provide more insight about communicating with vulnerable populations during disasters.

Last updated on hub: 17 March 2021

Submission to the Health and Social Care Committee inquiry into workforce burnout and resilience in the NHS and social care

King's Fund

This submission provides an overview of the resilience of the NHS and social care workforce, including the impact of Covid-19. It also examines what is known about the causes of burnout in the NHS and social care workforce – and what can help reduce it; and the implications for national policy

Last updated on hub: 26 October 2020

Order by    Date Title