COVID-19 resources

Results 461 - 470 of 1420

Care experienced children and young people’s mental health: ESSS Outline

The Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services

Evidence summary that provides an overview of recent evidence relating to care experienced children and young people’s mental health and the support available to them. The review explores the evidence on the reasons for poor mental health, including trauma, stigma and instability; the consequences of poor mental health for care experienced children; and the approaches used to support them, including assessment, support and interventions. The report finds that while there are a range of policies and services aimed at supporting the emotional wellbeing of care experienced children, priorities and approaches are not always consistent, and it is unclear which interventions and programmes work or are successful in or transferable from other countries. Support services do not consistently recognise the impact of the trauma and abuse that care experienced children and young people have often experienced; there is a lack of a proactive and preventative approach; there are barriers to accessing support; and children and young people often perceive care as something that is done to them, not with them. The report contains a brief overview on how the Covid-19 pandemic and approaches to dealing with it have affected care experienced young people.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Stories of shielding: life in the pandemic for those with health and care needs

National Voices

Brings together the voices and stories of people with long-term health conditions during COVID-19. The report is based on the submissions to the digital platform Our COVID Voices, which was created for people with health and care needs to share their experiences. The platform received 70 unfiltered views and stories from people at great risk of all the effects of the pandemic, including anxiety, uncertainty and changes to their care. But it goes much deeper, into their relationships, their jobs and dealing with the everyday aspects of life in the pandemic. This document collates quotes from these stories to provide an overview of the real-life experiences of individuals shielding.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Disability inclusive Covid-19 response

House of Commons Library

This briefing offers an overview of key aspects relating to efforts to include people with disabilities in the Government’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Focusing on England, it provides information on the Equality Act 2010, the wearing of face coverings, access to education and health services, employment support and social care during the coronavirus outbreak.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

The experience of older people instructed to shield or self-isolate during the COVID-19 pandemic

English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

19 pandemic A vital weapon in the fight against COVID-19 has been the shielding of clinically extremely vulnerable individuals at high risk, and instructions to clinically vulnerable people at moderate risk to stay at home and avoid face-to-face contact as far as possible. The consequences of this advice for mental health and well-being are not well understood. The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing COVID-19 Substudy provided an opportunity to evaluate impact on mental health, quality of life, social connectedness, worries, and health-related behaviour in more than 5,800 older men and women (mean age 70 years). We found that although most individuals instructed by the NHS or their GPs to isolate and avoid face-to-face contact stayed at home as far as possible (defined as high risk), only 60% were strictly isolating. The high risk participants experienced higher levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness, and reduced quality of life compared with others, and this was particularly marked among those who were isolating. Poor mental health was not related to reductions in social contacts, but there were higher levels of worry about obtaining food and other essentials. Physical activity was reduced and sleep impaired among high risk participants. The advice to people at risk may have saved lives and reduced infection, but it has come at a cost. If future outbreaks of COVID-19 require the reintroduction of shielding and avoidance of face-to-face contact, efforts should be made to allay concerns and encourage health promoting behaviour so as to avoid further impairment of the quality of life and mental health.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

The experience of older people with multimorbidity during the COVID-19 pandemic

English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

The risk of severe COVID-19 disease is known to be higher in older individuals with multiple long-term health conditions (multimorbidity). In this briefing, we report the latest findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing COVID-19 Substudy on the experiences of older people with multimorbidity during the pandemic. Not all people with multimorbidity would be classified as clinically vulnerable. We found that 35% of older individuals with multimorbidity were instructed by the NHS or their GP to shield (staying at home at all times and avoiding any face-to-face contact) on account of their vulnerability, and the majority were largely compliant with this advice. Relative to study members without multimorbidity, respondents with multimorbidity were more likely to report poor sleep quality, eating less, and being worried about not having enough food and other essentials. Unhealthy behaviours (sitting time, physical inactivity etc), poor mental health, and loneliness deteriorated considerably during the lockdown and in the two months following the lockdown. Access to medications among people with multimorbidity was not a problem, however, a fifth of individuals with multimorbidity did not have access to community health, social care services and support from other health professionals (e.g., dentist, podiatrist). When considering policies which advise people to shield or self-isolate because of their COVID-19 risk, it is important for policymakers to acknowledge that older people with multiple long-term health conditions are at higher risk of experiencing greater mental distress and worry, of engaging in unhealthy behaviours and are less likely to access health services when needed; all these factors together could potentially influence disease progression.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Changes in older people’s experiences of providing care and of volunteering during the COVID-19 pandemic

English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Engagement in socially productive activities, such as care provision and voluntary work, make important contributions to society, and may have been especially important during the coronavirus pandemic. They have also been associated with better health, well-being, and longer survival for older people. The ELSA COVID-19 Substudy provided data to allow for an exploration of how changes in caring and volunteering may have occurred during the pandemic, and to examine this in relation to factors such as sex, age, employment status, wealth, COVID-19 vulnerability and symptoms, and pre-pandemic experiences of health. Overall, there have been important changes in both the level of care provided by older people and the extent of their involvement in volunteering, with, on average, care provision more likely to have increased or stayed the same (65% of older carers reported this), and volunteering more likely to have decreased or stopped (61% of older volunteers reported this). However, a large number of older people took on new caring roles for someone outside the household (12%) and 4% of older people registered to volunteer as part of the NHS scheme. Both economic characteristics (such as paid employment and wealth) and health-related characteristics (such as being vulnerable, self-isolating, having experienced COVID-19 symptoms, and reporting functional limitations) were related to changes the frequency of caring and voluntary work. It is yet unclear how these changes in caring and volunteering have influenced older people’s health and well-being during the coronavirus outbreak. Investigating the impact of the pandemic on broader health and well-being outcomes for older people, the role of changes in care provision and volunteering in this, and how we might respond to this, is a crucial next step.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Impact of COVID-19 policy responses on live-in care workers in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland

Journal of Long-Term Care

Context: The measures taken to counter the COVID-19 pandemic restricted the circular migration of live-in care workers between their countries of origin and the elderly persons’ households. Objective: In this comparative policy analysis, the impact of COVID-19 related policy measures for transnationally organised live-in care in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland is investigated. Method: Policy measures and media debates were analysed and inquiries with care workers, representatives of care agencies, unions, and activist groups were carried out between March and June 2020. Findings: In accordance with their institutionalisation of live-in care, Austria, Germany, and Switzerland responded differently to the challenges the pandemic posed to live-in care arrangements. However, all three countries focused on extending care workers’ rotas and re-establishing transnational mobility. These priorities subordinated the interests of care workers to those of care recipients. Furthermore, the measures remained short-term solutions that failed to acknowledge the fundamental flaws and inequalities of a care model that relies primarily on female migrant workers and wage differentials within Europe. Limitations: This policy comparison is based on an in-depth analysis of COVID-19 related policies, supplemented by inquiries among stakeholders with whom research had been done prior to the pandemic. More in-depth interviews are required to further substantiate the findings concerning their perspectives and gain insight into the longer-term effects of the pandemic. Implications: The pandemic has brought the flaws of the live-in care model to the fore. Countries need to rethink their fragile care policies, which build on social inequality and uninhibited transnational mobility.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

The end of lockdown? The last six months in the lives of families raising disabled children

Family Fund

Findings of a study to understand how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting families raising disabled or seriously ill children in the UK and the need and concerns they have as a result of the pandemic. This document draws on three waves of online surveys, as well as in-depth interviews with a sample of families. In total more than 7,000 families raising 9,000 disabled or seriously ill children have participated in the research. The study demonstrates that the increased pressures and ongoing lack of support appear to be having a lasting negative impact on the financial and mental wellbeing of families raising disabled or seriously ill children. More specifically, the findings reveal that: half of families have lost income as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, and more than three quarters are experiencing increased household costs; two in five families have seen their savings reduce, leaving seven in 10 families with no money to fall back on and increasing levels of debt; more than three in five families have seen the levels of formal and informal support decrease since the coronavirus outbreak, with many still going without vital forms of support; the mental health and wellbeing of the majority of disabled or seriously ill children, as well as their siblings and parent carers, has been negatively impacted, and showing little signs of recovery. The report concludes by arguing that addressing these health and wellbeing needs, as well as their growing financial and support needs are the most pressing priorities put forward by families.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Cross-departmental actions for vulnerable children and young people during the Covid-19 pandemic period: consultation document

Northern Ireland. Department of Health

This plan has been developed in response to the challenges and risks facing children, young people and their families in Northern Ireland due to the Covid-19 pandemic. It is intended to reflect a series of activities that will be, or have been, undertaken across the Executive to meet the needs of vulnerable children, young people and their families during this time and in the recovery period after. The aim of the plan is to promote the safety and well-being of children and young people during the Covid-19 pandemic period within the home environment and within the wider community; and to strengthen system capacity to respond to current challenges and risks; and rebuild services. This consultation seek to ensure to ensure the plan reflects the activities that are being undertaken to support children and vulnerable families during Covid-19; reflects how services have adapted and enhanced provision to continue to support children and families during Covid-19; and includes new actions, which have been undertaken specifically to address some of lockdown's risks and challenges.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

The more you know, the less you fear: reflexive social work practices in times of COVID-19

International Social Work

This article presents the results of a strategy to disseminate best social work practices during periods of social lockdown in Spain, in a climate characterised by post-truth, misinformation and fake news. Social work is challenged with the task of delivering reliable and quality information aimed at building a better society. At the time of writing, Spain was one of the countries most affected by COVID-19, with one of the highest numbers of deaths per million inhabitants in the world. With the population in lockdown, the strategy was to design a series of innovative web seminars on both the subject and the procedures involved in social work, with the aim of sharing information and best practices to counter disinformation campaigns on social media. The results show the growing demand – both by citizens in general and students and professionals in particular – for reliable information in the field of professional practice. One of the priorities of digital social work must be to disseminate its results in the digital environment.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020