COVID-19 resources

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The end of lockdown? The last six months in the lives of families raising disabled children: Northern Ireland findings

Family Fund

Findings from a survey to understand how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting families raising disabled or seriously ill children in the UK and the concerns and needs of families raising disabled or seriously ill children. This document sets out the findings from across the three waves of surveys. In total 275 families raising 362 disabled or seriously ill children have participated in the research in Northern Ireland. The key findings are: half of families have lost income as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, and more than three quarters are experiencing increased household costs; half of families have seen their savings reduce, leaving three in five families with no money to fall back on and increasing levels of debt; less than one in five disabled or seriously ill children attended their nursery, school or college prior to the summer break, although the vast majority continued to receive some form of support; more than two thirds of families have seen the levels of formal and informal support decrease since the coronavirus outbreak, with many still going without vital forms of support; the mental health and wellbeing of the majority of disabled or seriously ill children, as well as their siblings and parent carers, has been negatively impacted, and showing little signs of recovery; addressing these health and wellbeing needs, as well as their growing financial and support needs are the most pressing priorities put forward by families.

Last updated on hub: 20 January 2021

The end of lockdown? The last six months in the lives of families raising disabled children: Wales findings

Family Fund

Findings from a survey to understand how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting families raising disabled or seriously ill children in the UK and the concerns and needs of families raising disabled or seriously ill children. This document sets out the findings from across the three waves of surveys. In total 189 families raising 237 disabled or seriously ill children have participated in the research in Wales. The key findings are: half of families have lost income as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, and more than four in five are experiencing increased household costs; two in five families have seen their savings reduce, leaving four in five families with no money to fall back on and increasing levels of debt; less than one in five disabled or seriously ill children attended their nursery, school or college prior to the summer break, although the vast majority continued to receive some form of support; more than three in five families have seen the levels of formal and informal support decrease since the coronavirus outbreak, with many still going without vital forms of support; the mental health and wellbeing of the majority of disabled or seriously ill children, as well as their siblings and parent carers, has been negatively impacted, and showing little signs of recovery; addressing these health and wellbeing needs, as well as their growing financial and support needs are the most pressing priorities put forward by families.

Last updated on hub: 20 January 2021

The end of lockdown? The last six months in the lives of families raising disabled children: Scotland findings

Family Fund

Findings from a survey to understand how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting families raising disabled or seriously ill children in the UK and the concerns and needs of families raising disabled or seriously ill children. This document sets out the findings from across the three waves of surveys. In total almost 700 families raising more than 900 disabled or seriously ill children have participated in the research in Scotland. The key findings are: half of families have lost income as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, and more than three quarters are experiencing increased household costs; two in five families have seen their savings reduce, leaving seven in 10 families with no money to fall back on and increasing levels of debt. Just one in 10 disabled or seriously ill children attended their nursery, school or college prior to the summer break, although the vast majority continued to receive some form of support; two thirds of families have seen the levels of formal and informal support decrease since the coronavirus outbreak, with many still going without vital forms of support; the mental health and wellbeing of the majority of disabled or seriously ill children, as well as their siblings and parent carers, has been negatively impacted, and showing little signs of recovery; addressing these health and wellbeing needs, as well as their growing financial and support needs are the most pressing priorities put forward by families.

Last updated on hub: 20 January 2021

The end of lockdown? The last six months in the lives of families raising disabled children: England findings

Family Fund

Findings from a survey to understand how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting families raising disabled or seriously ill children in the UK and the concerns and needs of families raising disabled or seriously ill children. This document sets out the findings from across the three waves of surveys. In total almost 6,000 families raising more than 7,600 disabled or seriously ill children have participated in the research in England. The key findings are: half of families have lost income as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, and more than three quarters are experiencing increased household costs; two in five families have seen their savings reduce, leaving seven in 10 families with no money to fall back on and increasing levels of debt; just a third of disabled or seriously ill children attended their nursery, school or college prior to the summer break, although the vast majority continued to receive some form of support; more than three in five families have seen the levels of formal and informal support decrease since the coronavirus outbreak, with many still going without vital forms of support; the mental health and wellbeing of the majority of disabled or seriously ill children, as well as their siblings and parent carers, has been negatively impacted, and showing little signs of recovery; addressing these health and wellbeing needs, as well as their growing financial and support needs are the most pressing priorities put forward by families.

Last updated on hub: 20 January 2021

Review of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic: interim report

Care Quality Commission

This interim report sets out the progress of a review of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions taken during the COVID-19 pandemic and expectations around DNACPR. The revies found that there was confusion and miscommunication about the application of DNACPRs at the start of the pandemic, and a sense of providers being overwhelmed. There is evidence of unacceptable and inappropriate DNACPRs being made at the start of the pandemic. However, there was a quick response from multiple agencies to highlight the issue and since then, there is no evidence to suggest that it has continued as a widespread problem; there are, however, differing views on the extent to which people are now experiencing positive person-centred care and support in relation to this issue. It is possible that in some cases inappropriate DNACPRs remain in place. The CQC expects all care providers to assure themselves that any DNACPR decisions have been made appropriately, in discussion with the person and in line with legal requirements and best practice. It also expects all providers and local systems to ensure that any discussions about DNACPR happen as part of person-centred advance care planning, and in accordance with legal requirements.

Last updated on hub: 20 January 2021

Responding to COVID19: examples of changing and emerging practice across the East of England

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

Since the start of the pandemic in March 2020, COVID19 has prompted a wide range of much needed and proactive responses to ensure people stay as independent as possible, well, safe and connected. Barriers that existed before the pandemic, have in most cases easily been removed. There is evidence of communication, partnership working and digital technology being embraced. Although it is recognised that face to face responses will continue to play an important role, there is evidence of emerging practice which has achieved better outcomes for people and that should be sustained post COVID19. This publication highlights some of those. The paper shares examples of emerging practice during the pandemic. They cover a multitude of areas such as: the use of digital technology; supporting care markets and providers; reaching out to people and communities; supporting people with accommodation needs; ensuring person-centred care and coproduction; and supporting the workforce to stay well.

Last updated on hub: 19 January 2021

What collaborative housing offers in a pandemic: evidence from 18 communities in England and Wales

Housing LIN

This paper captures the responses and experiences of how community-led housing (CLH) projects in England and Wales have coped during the pandemic. It highlights how the benefits of CLHs have fostered community and neighbourly support but also how this has been challenged by the restrictions necessitated by the pandemic. The research found that the Covid-19 pandemic demonstrated the social value of community and neighbourly support amongst older and vulnerable residents, fostered by the ethos of the projects to give each other such support, given their collaborative and supportive approach. However, it was noted that pre-lockdown, these practices are based on residents being physically close to one another, often sharing spaces and resources to undertake community activities: situations potentially challenged by the restrictions necessitated by the pandemic. While the researchers found some of these activities were able to continue outdoors, all the respondents reported feeling the impact of having to distance from each other during lockdown. This was exacerbated depending on the availability of indoor and outdoor communal space and how this was shared and also the amount of support required – for example, a resident with an existing long term condition or care need.

Last updated on hub: 19 January 2021

Novel coronavirus (COVID19) standard operating procedure: COVID-19 vaccine deployment programme: frontline social care workers (JCVI Priority Cohort 2)

NHS England

This standard operating procedure (SOP) outlines the process for facilitating COVID-19 vaccination for frontline social care workers (excluding those working in care homes for older adults) as defined by the JCVI. This includes the identification of eligible care workers and the roles and responsibilities within local systems for enabling and supporting care workers to be vaccinated. The SOP also outlines how Hospital Hubs, Vaccination Centres and Local Vaccination Services should work to deliver COVID-19 vaccination to frontline social care workers at pace. It covers how they should work in partnership to match vaccination capacity to meet demand, support booking, on the day arrangements and data capture to monitor uptake. It does not cover the clinical delivery of the vaccine, which is covered in separate guidance.

Last updated on hub: 19 January 2021

Guidance to prevent COVID-19 among care home residents and manage cases, incidents and outbreaks in residential care settings in Wales

Public Health Wales

This public health guidance is intended for local authorities, Local Health Boards and registered providers of care homes or supported living arrangements where people share communal facilities. The majority of this guidance can be applied across a range of settings including residential homes for adults and children and supported living facilities where 24 hour care is provided. The guidance can also be applied to other settings such as retirement housing where there are communal facilities and additional care provided as well as other communal facilities such as those for people recovering from substance use, those experiencing mental health problems, the homeless and those seeking asylum. The guidance covers: prevention – keeping your setting coronavirus free; admission or placement of residents; caring for residents, depending on their COVID-19 status; advice for staff; incidents and outbreaks; and supporting existing residents that may require medical care.

Last updated on hub: 19 January 2021

Investigation into the housing of rough sleepers during the COVID-19 pandemic

National Audit Office

This investigation is part of a programme of work to support Parliament’s scrutiny of the government’s response to COVID-19. This report sets out the steps taken by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government in rehousing rough sleepers in England during the pandemic, focusing particularly on the steps taken at the outset of the pandemic; the information held by the Department on those at risk of rough sleeping; and subsequent steps that the Department has taken to provide long-term accommodation to those at risk of rough sleeping. The report primarily covers the period between March and November 2020. The report finds that by the end of November 2020 more than 33,000 people had been helped to find accommodation under Everyone In; local authorities expect to spend around £170 million rehousing rough sleepers in response to the pandemic in 2020-21, paid for by a combination of emergency grants, existing homelessness funding streams, and their own internal resources; COVID-19 infections and deaths have been relatively low among the homeless and rough sleeping population in England; for the winter of 2020, Everyone In will form one of a range of measures targeted on areas with large numbers of rough sleepers; In response to the pandemic, the Department brought forward planned funding to accelerate securing 3,300 homes for rough sleepers by 31 March 2021; in early 2020 the Department had identified a need to review its Rough Sleeping Strategy, but this has not yet been carried out. Everyone In has for the first time provided data on the potential scale of the population in England which either sleeps rough or is at risk of doing so. The report calls on the Department to build upon this knowledge to understand fully the size and needs of this population and communicate this to local authorities.

Last updated on hub: 19 January 2021