COVID-19 resources

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Coronavirus (COVID-19): information for families looking after someone with dementia

Dementia UK

Brings together advice and guidance for carers of people with dementia during the Covid-19 pandemic. Topics covered include: the ongoing challenges for people with dementia during coronavirus; questions and answers relating to the implications of coronavirus in specific settings; advice for people with dementia around face coverings; and care homes and the coronavirus outbreak.

Last updated on hub: 08 October 2020

Recommendations for safe visiting in care homes during the Covid-19 pandemic

Dementia UK

This flowchart describes the steps residential care providers need to take to ensure safe visiting during the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 08 October 2020

All Wales COVID-19 workforce risk assessment tool

Welsh Government

This risk assessment tool has been developed to help people working in the NHS and Social Care in Wales to see if they are at higher risk of developing more serious symptoms if they come into contact with the COVID-19 virus. It is aimed at everyone working or volunteering in health and social care in Wales. The tool asks a number of questions designed to identify whether employees/volunteers are at a higher risk from COVID-19. It asks some questions about age, health, weight and ethnicity which may increase your risk of serious illness following an infection with COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 08 October 2020

A catalyst for change: what COVID-19 has taught us about the future of local government

Nesta

This paper draws together insights from the experiences of local authorities in England, Wales and Scotland during the first six months of the COVID-19 crisis, providing an overview of their response, and of the changes needed to meet the demands of the pandemic. It discusses the upcoming challenges that could hamper the efforts of councils to embed and build upon these positive changes and set a positive vision for the future of local government in the aftermath of this crisis. This vision illustrates what local government could look like in ten years if it is able to preserve and build upon the progress made during the pandemic. The paper identifies several trends that are of particular significance to local government over the coming years: remote working will be retained by a large proportion of staff, including frontline staff; digital tools will enable a large proportion of council-run services to be delivered remotely; increased and enhanced public participation and engagement will lead to improved decision-making and better outcomes for communities; sharing power with local communities across design, delivery and ownership of services and assets will enhance their quality and produce wider benefits to communities in the form of empowerment, resilience and cohesion; greater and new types of collaboration between councils, statutory partners, the third and private sectors and communities will achieve better outcomes for their people and places; and greater devolution from central government will provide local areas with longer-term funding commitments and greater flexibility to design policy for their local context. This guide is part of the New Operating Models Handbook, a set of learning products which explore the new operating models emerging in local government, supporting innovation and asset-based practice.

Last updated on hub: 07 October 2020

‘The faintest stirring of hope became possible’: pandemic postscript

Ethics and Social Welfare

Editorial. While it is still too early to predict what will come, it is already possible to identify some of the values embedded in the pre-COVID19 social and economic life, to examine how they stand up to the epidemic and to start setting the ethical foundations for a post-COVID19 Social Work. The values discussed in the editorial include: free market hegemony, reducing the role of the state, weakening public service, social rights erosion, the faintest hope, what would it take to learn and emerge from this pandemic a better society.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

What we need now. What matters to people for health and care, during COVID-19 and beyond: new National Voices I Statements 2020. What has to happen now: National Voices’ recommendations to health and care leaders and professionals

National Voices

This report summarises how National Voices engaged with people who have ongoing health and care needs during the first phase of the pandemic and how this engagement led to a set of ‘I’ statements that describe what people who use health and care services now expect these services to look and feel like. The statements derive from the analysis of submissions to an online platform, OurCOVIDVoices, which allowed people to share their stories, including details about the impact of COVID-19 and lockdown on their physical and mental health in general, as well as their broad concerns about money, housing and accessing food. The statements will be useful to those leading the system, as well as those designing and delivering health and care services. The statements are: 1. I am listened to and what I say is acted on; 2. I make decisions that are respected, and I have rights that are protected; 3. I am given information that is relevant to me in a way I understand; 4. I am supported to understand risks and uncertainties in my life; 5. I know how to talk to the person or team in charge of my care when I need to; 6. I know what to expect and that I am safe when I have treatment and care; 7. I am supported and kept informed while I wait for treatment and care; 8. I am not forgotten. The document identifies some concrete actions that those in charge of health and care services could take to address the needs expressed in these statements.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

What we know now: what people with health and care needs experienced during the first wave of COVID-19

National Voices

This rapid review report outlines what people with health and care needs are experiencing as a result of the pandemic, what they feel truly effective and just treatment should look like, and how services should be designed and delivered. The report presents an analysis of the findings of surveys carried out during April-July 2020 by and on behalf of 11 health and care charities in England, which collectively reached at least 66,600 individuals with long-term health and care needs. The thematic analysis showed that the most widespread issues affecting individuals with long-term health and care needs during COVID-19 are: wellbeing – all 11 data groups showed clearly negative impacts on wellbeing, including increased anxiety and loneliness; access to medication – nine showed clearly negative impacts and two showed possible impacts; all groups reported some problems getting medicines, including essential medications such as insulin and anti-psychotics; getting food – nine showed clearly negative impacts and one showed possible negative impacts, including trouble getting food and going hungry; access to healthcare – nine showed clearly negative impacts, including cancelled appointments necessary to manage health conditions. The report makes key recommendations which include: do everything possible to avoid shutting down the health and care services that people with long-term health conditions rely on; listen to people and understand their experiences of shielding, lockdown and service shutdown better, to minimise risks and protect from harm that we did not know about before; in the event of further national advice to keep those vulnerable to COVID-19 safe, provide much better information and support for vulnerable and shielded individuals and their families; keep charities, and the people with health and care needs they work with, at the centre of future planning and responses.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Adult social care: Covid-19: winter plan 2020-2021 newsletter

39 Essex Chambers

This note provides an overview of the Department of Health and Social Care (non-statutory) guidance ‘Adult social care: our COVID-19 winter plan 2020 to 2021’. It discusses the key issues for local authorities, and in particular the interplay with the wellbeing principles of the Care Act 2014, including managing a potential conflict in terms of the wellbeing of both care home residents and those in the community with care and support needs as regards prevention of C-19. It also looks at the implications of the winter plan for the right to respect for family and private life, addressing the tension between the imperative to protect the health of social care users (and the social care workforce) and the need to respect the family life and private life rights of those who might be subject to protective restrictions. Finally, it explores the impact of the winter plan on deprivation of liberty safeguards, in particular in relation to testing and 14-day isolation requirements.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Coronavirus (Covid-19): changes to the Care Act 2014

39 Essex Chambers

Discusses the Care Act easements, provided for under the Coronavirus Act 2020. This briefing examines the guidance for local authorities on when it is appropriate to use the Care Act easements, emphasises the information that should be given to those being assessed and debates what changes to safeguarding policies may occur during the relaxation period. It also analyses the relationship between the Care Act easements guidance and the hospital discharge service requirements.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

COVID-19 in Japan, Part 2: the impact on social foster care leavers

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

The global spread of COVID-19 has greatly impacted society worldwide. People are unexpectedly finding themselves being forced to live differently than they are used to, especially those in vulnerable positions. In particular, care leavers who have left social foster care and live in the community are encountering difficult situations both financially and mentally without having parents or other family members to rely on. The results of questionnaires and interview surveys with care leavers suggest that it is necessary to expand the consultation support system for care leavers and to provide support to prevent isolation. It was also confirmed that the expansion of multiple and diverse financial support is an urgent issue.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020