COVID-19 resources on Home care

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Adult social care monthly statistics, England: August 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 27 July 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 93.5% of residents and 78.0% of staff of older adult care homes; 88.5% of residents of younger adult care homes; 75.2% of staff of younger adult care homes, 64.6% of domiciliary care staff and 32.2% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the week ending 28 July 2021: 91.9% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 83.8% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating. This proportion has remained consistent since mid-December; 74.0% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has gradually declined from 78.2% at the end of April 2021. Between May and mid-July, the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned among care home staff and residents gradually increased but was still substantially lower than numbers in mid-January.

Last updated on hub: 13 August 2021

An inquiry into the lived experience of Covid-19 in the home care sector in Ireland: clients’ experiences

Home and Community Care Ireland

This research is a qualitative study on the impact of Covid-19 on home care clients; including care provision, the medical and physical effects and the coping mechanisms used to get through the pandemic. The robust infection prevention and control (IPC) measures provided great reassurance to clients, with most continuing care without interruption. Home care proved to be the safest model of healthcare delivery in Ireland during the pandemic, with cases peaking at 193 cases in the week ending January 24th, 2021. Participants reported feeling a strain on their mental well-being. Social isolation was a significant factor. The requirement to cocoon and the closure of shops, recreational and day services meant participants had few social and leisure outlets, leading to reports of “cabin fever” and a loss of motivation. Having strong personal relationships was an important coping mechanism for participants. They pointed to family, friends, volunteer networks and carers as key sources of comfort, companionship and support. Participants used technology and the internet to maintain social connections, shop online and play video games. Offline, participants struggled with the closure of recreational and support services, with laborious activities like needlework being a popular activity. Participants spoke about the importance of keeping a positive mindset when coping with the pandemic. In conclusion, the IPC measures put in place by providers reassured participants that their home was safe and helped make home care the safest method of care during Covid-19 pandemic. While cocooning and social isolation placed a mental strain on participants, personal relationships, technology and a positive mentality helped them adapt and persevere.

Last updated on hub: 12 July 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: July 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 22 June 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 92.2% of residents and 72.8% of staff of older adult care homes; 86.1% of residents of younger adult care homes; 70.1% of staff of younger adult care homes, 57.8% of domiciliary care staff and 29.1% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the week ending 22 June 2021: 93% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 83.8% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating. This proportion has remained consistent since mid-December; 76.1% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has remained largely consistent since mid-December. Between mid-May and the end of June, there has been a gradual increase in the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned from care home staff, but this is still substantially fewer compared to mid-January; the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned from care home residents has been broadly stable and remains substantially lower than mid-January levels.

Last updated on hub: 12 July 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: June 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 25 May 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 88.0% of residents and 65.7% of staff of older adult care homes; 79.4% of residents of younger adult care homes; 61.1% of staff of younger adult care homes, 48.0% of domiciliary care staff and 22.7% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the same week, 87.4% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 84.2% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating; 76.7% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has remained largely consistent since mid-December. There were 467,100 PCR tests and 498,456 LFD tests taken by care home staff. There were 230 positive results returned from PCR tests and 306 returned from LFD tests, this has substantially decreased for both kits compared to mid-January. There were 77,499 PCR tests and 8,920 LFD tests taken by care home residents. There were 61 positive results returned from PCR tests and 4 returned from LFD tests, this has substantially decreased for both kits compared to mid-January.

Last updated on hub: 12 July 2021

Coronavirus (COVID-19) testing for adult social care services

Department of Health and Social Care

Outlines the COVID-19 testing available for testing staff, residents and visitors for all adult social care settings. Testing for COVID-19 in adult social care (ASC) is crucial to help protect those who receive care and adult social care staff. Testing programmes identify people who may unknowingly have the virus, enabling those who test positive and their contacts to self-isolate and break the chain of transmission. This page brings together testing guidance for a range of specific adult social care settings: testing for adult care homes; testing for extra care and supported living settings; testing for homecare staff; testing for personal assistants; and testing for day care centres. [First published 24 March 2021 with the title: Coronavirus (COVID-19) testing for adult social care settings. Last updated: 31 March 2022.]

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2021

Long-term care at home and female work during the COVID-19 pandemic

Health Policy

This study analyzes the impacts of COVID-19 on two elements: long-term care at home, which is available for care recipients who live in their own home, and working status in Japan. A regression analysis of municipality data reveals that the number of users of adult daycare is negatively correlated to COVID-19, both nationally and regionally. This finding is intuitive because people avoid daycare due to the increased risk of exposure to infection. However, the number of users of home care is positively correlated to users of daycare, which implies that home care has not functioned as a replacement for daycare, despite government encouragement. Furthermore, a regression analysis using prefecture data shows that working hours for both females and males were negatively correlated to the national status of the pandemic, while the regional status of the pandemic was negatively correlated only to female working hours. This implies that female labor status is more vulnerable to such outbreaks in Japan. Also, this study finds consistent results with a situation in which informal care compensated for the decline in daycare use; and this care has been provided primarily by especially females who have reduced their working hours by COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 02 July 2021

Coronavirus (COVID-19) testing available for adult social care in England

Department of Health and Social Care

Outlines the COVID-19 testing available for testing staff, residents and visitors for all adult social care settings. The guidance covers: regular testing cycle for care home residents and staff (England); outbreak testing for care home residents and staff (England); care home family and friend visitors; visiting professionals in care homes; extra care and supported living settings; home care testing; day care centres; and universal testing. [Published: 24 March 2021; Last updated: 29 June 2021]

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: May 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 27 April 2021, the proportions who had received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 94.6% of residents and 81.0% of staff of older adult care homes; 89.8% of residents of younger adult care homes; 77.5% of staff of younger adult care homes, 72.8% of domiciliary care staff and 70.7% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the week ending 26 April 2021: 82.5% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 83.6% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating; 78.2% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has remained largely consistent since mid-December. ln the week ending 27 April 2021: there were 480,530 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests and 505,822 lateral flow device (LFD) tests taken by care home staff. There were 319 positive results returned from PCR tests and 411 returned from LFD tests, this has substantially decreased for both kits compared to mid-January; there were 78,417 PCR tests and 7,905 LFD tests taken by care home residents.

Last updated on hub: 17 May 2021

Home palliative care professionals perception of challenges during the Covid-19 outbreak: a qualitative study

Palliative Medicine

Background: Home palliative care services have played an essential role during the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak by providing symptom control, drug procurement, and psychological support for frail patients and their families unable to leave their homes. Aim: To understand how home palliative care professionals were affected by the outbreak, describing changes and challenges in their daily work as well as their reactions to the Covid-19 pandemic in Italy. Design: Qualitative study conducted using telephone semi-structured interviews, with thematic analysis. Setting/participants: Thirty home care professionals working for an Italian non-profit organization which provides home palliative care for cancer patients and their families. Results: Three main themes were identified. The first theme showed both patient-related and practice-related challenges participants faced in their daily work, requiring the implementation of different communication methods and patient and family education on risk prevention. The second theme showed the perception of increased responsibility and being the only landmark for family played a decisive role in participants’ positive attitude. The third theme highlighted the participants’ perception of the critical role of a home care setting in this emergency situation. Conclusions: The first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic brought many challenges and stressors for home palliative care professionals. On the other side, they reported a satisfaction with their critical role in carrying out their work with patients at risk.

Last updated on hub: 06 May 2021

Personal protective equipment (PPE): resource for care workers delivering domiciliary care during sustained COVID-19 transmission in England

Public Health England

Guidance for those working in domiciliary care providing information on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during sustained coronavirus (COVID-19) transmission in England. It explains how PPE guidance applies to the homecare (domiciliary care) setting and is drawn from full infection prevention and control (IPC) and PPE guidance. The guidance is primarily for care workers and providers delivering care in visiting homecare, extra care housing and live-in homecare settings. [Published 27 April 2020; Last updated 5 July 2021]

Last updated on hub: 20 April 2021

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