COVID-19 resources on infection control

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Report 04: changes in children and young people’s emotional and behavioural difficulties through lockdown

University of Oxford

This report provides longitudinal data from 2,890 parents and carers who took part in both a baseline and follow up questionnaires tracking the mental health of school-aged children and young people aged 4-16 years throughout the COVID-19 crisis. The report examines changes in parent and carer and adolescent self-reported emotional, behavioural and restless and attentional difficulties over a one-month period as lockdown has progressed. It shows that over a one-month period in lockdown parents and carers of primary school age children report an increase in their child’s emotional, behavioural, and restless and attentional difficulties; parents and carers of secondary school age children report a reduction in their child’s emotional difficulties, but an increase in restless and attentional behaviours; adolescents report no change in their own emotional or behavioural, and restless and attentional difficulties; parents and carers of children with SEN and those with a pre-existing mental health difficulty report a reduction in their child’s emotional difficulties and no change in behavioural or restless and attentional difficulties; parents and carers of high-income households report an increase in their child’s behavioural difficulties.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Domestic abuse: get help during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak

Home Office

Guidance on how to get help for people who are victims of domestic violence or know someone who is a victim of domestic abuse. It acknowledges that coronavirus household isolation instructions can cause anxiety for those who are experiencing or feel at risk of domestic abuse and makes it clear that those instructions do not apply if someone needs to leave their home to escape domestic abuse. The guidance covers the following topics: coronavirus (COVID-19) and domestic abuse; recognise domestic abuse; report it; get help if you, or someone you know, is a victim; economic abuse; welfare benefits and housing advice; get help if you think you may be an abuser; support for employers and professionals; get legal help; What to do if you don’t have settled status in the UK. The guidance signposts to additional support materials. [Published 5 October 2018. Last updated 6 August 2020]

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Research briefing one: child protection, social distancing and risks from COVID-19

University of Birmingham

This briefing shares some emerging findings about the challenges of achieving social distancing during child protection work, especially on home visits, and how children and families and social workers can be kept safe from COVID-19. The data shows that social workers, family support workers and their managers have worked creatively in addressing the complex practical and moral dilemmas they have faced in implementing social distancing guidance and in aspiring to best practice in helping children and families. The briefing focuses in particular on the implication of going into homes, the impossibility of social distancing, and virtual home visits; Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) use and dilemmas; and the professional values that guide social workers’ decisions about whether or not to conduct in person visits, including selflessness, public accountability and leadership. On the basis of the very early findings from this research, the briefing advises that social work staff should be told that they do not have to take any personal risks they do not feel comfortable with; staff doing visits inside family homes need to be provided with full PPE while other creative ways of seeing children, like in gardens, on walks, and on virtual visits, need to continue; social work leaders and managers at all levels need to address organisational anxieties by constantly being clear with frontline staff that how their practice and record keeping is evaluated will take full account of the constraints placed on their work by COVID-19 and social distancing.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Covid-19 and early intervention: understanding the impact, preparing for recovery

The Early Intervention Foundation

This report explores the impact of COVID-19 on early help – the range of services that would ordinarily be supporting vulnerable children and families below the threshold for statutory local authority support, including targeted support provided by universal services. It considers the response of local services across England to the immediate challenges presented by COVID-19, and the challenges on the horizon. This work was undertaken by EIF and Action for Children between March and May 2020 and is based on 28 semi-structured qualitative interviews with heads of early help services, lead practitioners, and head teachers. Areas of focus include: risk assessment and referral in a virtual environment; virtual delivery of services; maintaining essential face-to-face delivery; closure of school and early years provision; and longer-term issues. The findings indicate that the pandemic has necessitated rapid adaptation of the way that services support vulnerable children and families, characterised by an almost wholesale transition to virtual or online contact while retaining some element of face-to-face provision when needed. There is a unique opportunity to improve the evidence base on virtual delivery of early intervention for children and families through seizing the opportunity for testing and evaluation. Conversely, the professionals recognise that there is a risk that some children and families who became vulnerable or became more vulnerable during the lockdown period could be missed without home visits. The research also identified a clear sense of apprehension among professionals about the longer-term impact of the pandemic and particularly the lockdown period on vulnerable children and families, and about the ability of services to cope with the demand that this will create.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Guidance for Domestic Abuse Perpetrator Programmes: Covid-19 challenges

Respect

This guidance paper helps organisations working with perpetrators and victims of domestic abuse overcome the challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. All organisations face problems with service delivery, continuity of staffing and the capacity to support and work with clients. The guide explores how to continue to deliver programmes and support safely; service delivery via phone and video-calling; strategies for calming, de-escalating and containing abusive behaviour; check-ins and case management; supporting delivery practitioners professionally and emotionally; and dealing with new clients.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Staying safe during COVID-19: guidance for practitioners working with those who harm

SafeLives

Guidance to help practitioners working with perpetrators of domestic violence during the COVID-19 crisis. The document explores: how to ensure clients get support from family and friends; self-care; general safety planning; structured strategy to help clients de-escalate situations before they become violent or abusive; and supporting support workers.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Accommodation for perpetrators of domestic abuse: emerging issues and responses due to COVID-19

Drive Project

Isolation and social distancing during the COVID-19 lockdown have led and are likely to continue to lead to an increase in domestic abuse, violence and coercive control at all levels of risk. This paper argues that, where it would be in the best interests of the victim and better ensure their safety and wellbeing, adequate housing provision is urgently needed for perpetrators of domestic violence. The lack of availability of such accommodation is limiting options available to victims and police in their endeavour to keep victims safe.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Understanding the impact of COVID-19 responses on citizens

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide that discusses the impact of COVID-19 and responses on people who use or interact with social care services.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Social connection, loneliness and lockdown

Research In Practice: Dartington

Katy Shorten gives a comprehensive overview of loneliness and key messages from the literature for social care. The blog covers: identifying loneliness; the importance of social networks and activities; the role of technology; partnership working with organisations that support people and communities; building relationships; and being person-centred. The blog signposts to key evidence and resources.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Home care for patients with COVID-19 presenting with mild symptoms and management of their contacts: interim guidance

World Health Organization

This rapid advice is intended to guide public health and infection prevention and control professionals, health care managers and health care workers when addressing issues related to home care for patients with suspected COVID-19 who present with mild symptoms and when managing their contacts. The guidance is based on evidence about COVID-19 and the feasibility of implementing infection prevention and control measures at home.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

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