COVID-19 resources on Infection control

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Partners in care: resources to support meaningful visits

National Care Forum

This set of resources is designed to provide practical support to care homes and their relatives and loved ones to adopt the default position that care homes are open for visiting. Care homes must be supported to enable and welcome visits by families and friends, now and in the future. It is clear that we must find a way to resolve the challenge of visiting in care homes for the longer term; we are facing a world where we will have to live with COVID-19 for the foreseeable months and indeed years. This means reaching an agreed partnership position, with practical measures, rights and responsibilities that enables visiting long term rather than the current cycle of crisis short term approaches. The National Care Forum has worked with care providers and residents and relatives organisations to develop these Partners in Care resources to support meaningful visits. It includes: a Visiting Charter – sets out a shared set of rights and responsibilities; a Visiting Pledge – covers key commitments that all parties can sign up to; and useful practical resources to support the charter and the pledge.

Last updated on hub: 22 March 2021

Patients living with dementia who ‘walk with purpose or intent’ in the COVID-19 crisis

NIHR Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) West

This evidence summary looks at how to manage care home residents with dementia who ‘walk with purpose or intent’ such that infection prevention measures are not breached during an epidemic such as COVID-19. It identified clear guidance from the British Geriatric Society (BGS) on the approach of care home staff for residents with dementia who ‘walk with purpose or intent’ during the COVID 19 crisis. The guidance focuses on isolation of suspected cases and behavioural approach to ameliorating potential unsafe activities of residents. The British Psychological Society’s Faculty of the Psychology of Older People also describes primary preventative and secondary reactive behavioural approaches that can be used to care for residents during the COVID 19 outbreak.

Last updated on hub: 10 June 2020

People and places in London most vulnerable to COVID-19 and its social and economic consequences

New Policy Institute

This report identifies groups of people whose socio-economic status puts them at higher risk of either catching COVID-19 or passing it on, experiencing harm to their health and wellbeing during lockdown; or experiencing harm as both lockdown and the emergency measures introduced to alleviate it, are lifted. The report is divided into four sections, looking at people and households who face higher risks as a result of: COVID-19 itself and the wider pandemic; the economic recession; housing insecurity; and having pre-existing additional support needs. Built around a set of statistical indicators, the report offers a picture of the scale of vulnerability and how it varies across London boroughs. Half the indicators show the background (pre-pandemic) position and half show how things have changed since March 2020. Four of the 29 indicators are restricted to London (or London subregions) while one is national. The report’s main message is that the vulnerabilities flowing from the pandemic and the accompanying recession affect more and different people than those who are usually seen as vulnerable. While the need to protect older people from the virus remains paramount, the report concludes that the pandemic and recession should be seen as a crisis for people of working-age, especially those in the 20s, 30s and 40s, and their children.

Last updated on hub: 10 March 2021

Personal assistants eligible for vaccination as part of national priority group two: frontline social care workers

Local Government Association

These questions and answers document has been developed with leading organisations and individual councils working to support take-up of vaccination among frontline social care workers. To be eligible for vaccination in the national priority group two, personal assistants need to be caring for someone who is clinically extremely vulnerable to COVID-19, and/or has a defined underlying health condition leading to greater risk of disease or mortality from COVID-19, and/or is of advanced age (85+); this is set out in detail in the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) published on 14 January 2021. Topics areas include: eligibility and the process for getting vaccinated; data sharing; employment-related questions; unpaid carers; and vaccinations for people being cared for by a PA.

Last updated on hub: 03 March 2021

Personal assistants returning from shielding

Mark Bates Ltd

Fact sheet offering support to people who employ personal assistants with regards to their employee returning to work, following the lifting of shielding measures by the Government.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

Personal protective equipment (PPE): care workers delivering homecare during the Covid-19 response

Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch

This national intelligence report provides insight into a current safety risk that the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (HSIB) has identified, relating to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) by care workers when visiting a patient at home. It documents how concerns raised by HSIB were responded to by Public Health England, the body responsible for the development of guidelines for the appropriate use of PPE. The report finds that there are multiple Covid-19 guidelines for different care sectors. PPE guidelines should be used in conjunction with other guidelines, such as infection control guidelines, so that care providers can develop protocols for care delivery. This is challenging when guidelines are updated, or new guidelines are issued and there is a risk that guidance may be missed. The report argues that there is an opportunity to introduce a document management system for guidelines to ensure that the latest information is available. This would involve the design of a usable navigation system so that all related guidelines relevant to a particular care sector are visible and can be checked for completeness.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Personal protective equipment (PPE): resource for care workers delivering domiciliary care during sustained COVID-19 transmission in England

Public Health England

Guidance for those working in domiciliary care providing information on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during sustained coronavirus (COVID-19) transmission in England. It explains how PPE guidance applies to the homecare (domiciliary care) setting and is drawn from full infection prevention and control (IPC) and PPE guidance. The guidance is primarily for care workers and providers delivering care in visiting homecare, extra care housing and live-in homecare settings. [Published 27 April 2020; Last updated 6 April 2021]

Last updated on hub: 20 April 2021

Personal protective equipment (PPE): resource for care workers delivering homecare (domiciliary care) during sustained COVID-19 transmission in the UK

Public Health England

Guidance for those working in domiciliary care providing information on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during sustained coronavirus (COVID-19) transmission in the UK. It explains how PPE guidance applies to the homecare (domiciliary care) setting and is drawn from full infection prevention and control (IPC) and PPE guidance. The guidance is primarily for care workers and providers delivering care in visiting homecare, extra care housing and live-in homecare settings. [Published 27/04/202. Last updated 18/05/2021]

Last updated on hub: 28 April 2020

Personal protective equipment (PPE): resource for care workers working in care homes during sustained COVID-19 transmission in England

Public Health England

This guidance provides advice for care workers working in care homes on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during the period of sustained transmission of the coronavirus (COVID-19). The guidance is also relevant for those providing residential supported living. This resource, which has been designed to be accessible to both care workers and providers, has four sections containing: recommendations on the use of PPE for a range of relevant contexts; explanation concerning recommendations and frequently asked questions; specialist advice relating to care for people with learning disabilities and/or autism; and case scenarios designed to illustrate appropriate use of PPE in practice. It should be read in conjunction with the full infection prevention and control (IPC) and PPE government guidance. [Published 17 April 2020; Last updated 18 May 2021]

Last updated on hub: 23 June 2020

Perspectives from the front line: the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on BME communities

NHS Confederation

This report distils the findings of a research study into the underlying factors affecting the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. It is based on interviews with BME NHS leaders, clinicians, community organisations and service users, and a survey of over 100 members of the NHS Confederation’s BME Leadership Network. Topics covered include: inequalities and health; institutional racism; racial discrimination on the front line; communication; and the Black Lives Matter movement. Overwhelmingly, participants point to long-standing inequalities and institutional racism as root causes. Interviewees were united in the view that despite the wealth of data collected by the national bodies and numerous reviews on the relationship between health, inequalities and BME communities, the NHS and government had not taken sufficient action to address the underlying issues. To redress this, it will be crucial to treat long-term structural health inequities and institutional racism as critical factors when planning services and emergency responses. To break down barriers to accessing healthcare, the government should take immediate steps to review the potential for hostile environment policies to be a vehicle for promoting institutional racism. BME health and care professionals were reported to be more likely to take on high-risk roles, including working on COVID-19 wards, due to fear that contracts may not be renewed or shifts reduced – this was compounded by a bullying culture which meant that BME employees were less likely to raise concerns or share their experiences. The report argues that the health service should look to adopt a new model of leadership that welcomes and values innovators with roots in BME communities and a track record of anti-racism. Integrated care systems should lead the development of governance and human resources functions that facilitate diverse leadership in line with commitments in the NHS People Plan.

Last updated on hub: 04 January 2021

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