COVID-19 resources on Infection control

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Adult social care coronavirus winter plan 2020-21: briefing and gap analysis for councils

Local Government Association

This briefing summarises the key messages in the Adult Social Care Winter Plan, highlighting the role local authorities must play in the delivery of the plan. It includes a summary of the key actions for local authorities within the plan, in a format which enables them to verify that actions are in place, ready for the assurance that has to be submitted to the Department of Health and Social Care on 31 October. The actions are grouped into four themes: preventing and controlling the spread of infection in care settings; collaboration across health and care services; supporting people who receive social care, the workforce, and carers; and supporting the system.

Last updated on hub: 12 October 2020

What is the risk of transmission of COVID-19 when delivering domiciliary care, and how effective are interventions that aim to minimise that risk?: a rapid review

Public Health England

A review of the evidence related to the transmission of COVID-19 in domiciliary care. No studies were found describing the risk of transmission when delivering domiciliary care (either from the care worker to care receiver or vice versa). Furthermore, no studies were found describing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to reduce the spread of COVID-19 when delivering domiciliary care. Professional opinions on how to safely deliver domiciliary care were identified in the literature; these support the application of general infection prevention and control practices, the use of risk assessments, ensuring staff are appropriately trained and employing an ‘only when necessary’ approach to face-to-face contact.

Last updated on hub: 12 October 2020

Limiting staff movement and cohorting of residents to reduce the transmission of Covid-19 in care homes: a rapid review

Public Health England

Findings from a review of the evidence to examine the effectiveness of strategies to restrict staff movement and isolate groups of residents showing symptoms of Covid-19 (‘cohorting’) in reducing the transmission of the virus. The review found low-level evidence from three Covid-19 outbreaks in North America suggesting that restricting staff movement and cohorting of residents could help to reduce the transmission of Covid-19 within care homes. To fully understand the effectiveness of these two types of intervention in relation to Covid-19, more high-quality research is needed. Indirect evidence from the management of influenza and other outbreaks in care home settings may help to supplement understanding of effectiveness.

Last updated on hub: 12 October 2020

Beating the Virus

Beyond Words

A short wordless story to help people understand what to do if they have Coronavirus and how to keep themselves and those who they care about safe. The story also shows how to safely help others who may be self-isolating. Supplementary text at the end of the story gives information on where people can seek help if they are unwell and signposts to other useful resources.

Last updated on hub: 12 October 2020

Achieving safe, effective, and compassionate quarantine or isolation of older adults with dementia in nursing homes

American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Nursing homes are facing the rapid spread of COVID-19 among residents and staff and are at the centre of the public health emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As policy changes and interventions designed to support nursing homes are put into place, there are barriers to implementing a fundamental, highly effective element of infection control, namely the isolation of suspected or confirmed cases. Many nursing home residents have dementia, associated with impairments in memory, language, insight, and judgment that impact their ability to understand and appreciate the necessity of isolation and to voluntarily comply with isolation procedures. While there is a clear ethical and legal basis for the involuntary confinement of people with dementia, the potential for unintended harm with these interventions is high, and there is little guidance for nursing homes on how to isolate safely, while maintaining the human dignity and personhood of the individual with dementia. This commentary discusses strategies for effective, safe, and compassionate isolation care planning, and present a case vignette of a person with dementia who is placed in quarantine on a dementia unit.

Last updated on hub: 08 October 2020

Rapid evidence review: inequalities in relation to COVID-19 and their effects on London

Greater London Authority

This report provides the outcomes of a rapid evidence review to document and understand the impact of COVID-19 (in terms of both health and the broader impacts on existing social and economic inequalities) on those with protected characteristics as well as those living in poorer, or more precarious, socioeconomic circumstances, paying particular attention to its effect in London. It highlights the disproportionate effect of Covid-19 in relation to disability, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic position, age and other factors, including homelessness and being in prison. This is both in terms of risk of COVID-19 infection, complications and mortality, and in terms of the negative economic, social and psychological consequences of Government policies to mitigate the health impacts of the pandemic. The research analysed existing data from local and national sources to assess the impact of the pandemic on people with characteristics protected by law. It reveals that, across the country: Black people are at almost twice the risk of death from Covid-19 than White people; men are disproportionately more likely to die from Covid-19, but women have experienced disproportionate economic, social and psychological impacts; death rates are three times higher for men in lower-paid, manual roles, such as construction and personal care, than in those in management, business and desk-based jobs; the pandemic has negatively impacted disabled Londoners who reported increased difficulties performing practical tasks such as shopping for groceries, as well as accessing up-to-date health information about the virus; almost four in five LGBTQ+ people said that their mental health had been negatively impacted by the coronavirus lockdown. The report also found that voluntary and community sector organisations play a crucial role in reaching those disproportionately impacted and marginalised groups, including disabled people.

Last updated on hub: 08 October 2020

LESS COVID-19: Learning by Experience and Supporting the Care Home Sector during the COVID-19 pandemic: key lessons learnt, so far, by frontline care home and NHS staff

National Care Forum

This report sets out findings of a research study to capture the experiences of frontline care home and NHS staff caring for older people with COVID-19 and to share the lessons learnt about the presentation, trajectories, and management of the infection with care homes that have and have not yet experienced the virus. The research comprised two phases: interviews with frontline care home and NHS staff in June and July (n=35); and consultation with senior operational and quality managers in care homes in September (n=11). The findings are presented under the following themes: clinical presentation – COVID-19 does not always present as a cough and fever in older people; unpredictable illness trajectory; managing symptoms and providing supportive care; recovery and rehabilitation – promoting physical, cognitive and emotional well-being post-virus; end of life care; infection prevention and control; and promoting partnership through cross sector working and support. The research highlights the value of ongoing reflective learning and the importance of sharing collective expertise in care and in practice. However, it also reveals systemic issues associated with underfunding, limited integration across health and social care and a lack of wider recognition and value of the contribution of the care home sector and (importantly) its staff. The report concludes with a call to action, stressing the importance of sharing collective expertise, expanding the use of digital technology, and formally recognising and supporting care home staff. It also calls on the Government to ensure policy making, guidance, effective resourcing (including PPE), and plans for action are created in equal partnership with the care sector; to invest in the care sector to enable better reward and recognition of the care workforce; and to improve the testing capacity for social care to cover all care settings, including day services.

Last updated on hub: 08 October 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): information for families looking after someone with dementia

Dementia UK

Brings together advice and guidance for carers of people with dementia during the Covid-19 pandemic. Topics covered include: the ongoing challenges for people with dementia during coronavirus; questions and answers relating to the implications of coronavirus in specific settings; advice for people with dementia around face coverings; and care homes and the coronavirus outbreak.

Last updated on hub: 08 October 2020

Recommendations for safe visiting in care homes during the Covid-19 pandemic

Dementia UK

This flowchart describes the steps residential care providers need to take to ensure safe visiting during the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 08 October 2020

Adult social care: Covid-19: winter plan 2020-2021 newsletter

39 Essex Chambers

This note provides an overview of the Department of Health and Social Care (non-statutory) guidance ‘Adult social care: our COVID-19 winter plan 2020 to 2021’. It discusses the key issues for local authorities, and in particular the interplay with the wellbeing principles of the Care Act 2014, including managing a potential conflict in terms of the wellbeing of both care home residents and those in the community with care and support needs as regards prevention of C-19. It also looks at the implications of the winter plan for the right to respect for family and private life, addressing the tension between the imperative to protect the health of social care users (and the social care workforce) and the need to respect the family life and private life rights of those who might be subject to protective restrictions. Finally, it explores the impact of the winter plan on deprivation of liberty safeguards, in particular in relation to testing and 14-day isolation requirements.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

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